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Southern Convenor „ Chwi^ Churchy 
1844 - Over a Century of Service to the Denomination - 1948 

The CHRISTIAN SUN 

ORGAN OF THE SOUTHERN CONVENTION OF CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 
In Essentials, Unity — In Non-Essentials, Liberty — In All Things, Charity 



Volume CI. 



RICHMOND, VA., THURSDAY, JANUARY, 1949. 



Number 1. 



FOREVER NEW 

"Behold, I make all things new." — Revelations 21 :5 

By WILLIAM ROBERT CATTON 
Decatur, Illinois 

Here is our message today: "The Christian Is Always Hopeful!" 
If you are discouraged today; if you are disillusioned; if you are tired; will 
you hear this message, "The Christian Is Always Hopeful." The Chris- 
tian is always hopeful, because he has abundant reason for his hope. 

His hopefulness is based on Faith in God. He does not need to be 
disillusioned, because he never needs to build his life on illusions. The 
truth, the reality of life, is ample ground on which to build. God is. This 
is God's world. God loves people. God loves you, and has a plan for 
you. There is a glorious destiny for all the sons of men. The Christian 
believes this. God's word has told him this. Jesus of Nazareth has told 
him this. His own conscience and his growing experience have told him 
this. He has good reason to be hopeful. He need not build his life upon 
the shifting sands of fond illusion : he builds it on the solid rock of truth, 
and Christian faith, and against all the shocks of disappointment, disillu- 
sionment and doubt, the storms of life that wreck the shallow hopes of 
other men, the Christian stands secure. He has reason for his hope. 

And Christian hope is based on more than this. It is grounded in our 
Christian good-will for one another. The joyous buoyant, exhuberant 
mood is sustained by our friendships with one another. It is the solitary 
person who grows despondent. Those who love, and are busy serving 
those they love, are the happy ones. It was to his very closest friends that 
Jesus spoke this great secret of the happy, hopeful life, "Whosoever would 
become great among you must be the servant of all." The more people 
you love, the more you give yourself to those you love, the greater your 
own soul ; the happier you become. 

And the Christian hope is based on more than this. It is grounded in 
the reality of the eternal life. The Christian understands that he is always 
young. He is always looking forward. The future is infinitely greater, 
for the Christian, than the past. He does not live as those for whom the 
joys of life are fading. They are forever new. 

This world is fundamentally good ! The more we really know it the 
better we will like it. The people of the world are fundamentally good : 
the more we really know them the better we will love them, and the more 
we love them, the more joyous our own lives will be. Life for each one 
of us is fundamentally good : the more of it we live, the more surely we 
will know this. Our heavenly Father is the father of a splendid family, 
a young and growing family, an eager, hopeful family. Our living Lord 
is "making all things new." We are eternally young! 



Page Two. 

I News Flashes \ 



Dr. and Mrs. F. C. Lester are the 
lesson writers for the new Adult Stu- 
dents' Quarterly. 



Rev. Emmanuel S. Hedgebeth has 
been elected president of the Daytona 
Beach Ministerial Association. 



Dr. Howell D. Davies, whose article 
appears in this issue, will be a visitor 
at Elon College, January 23-25. 



The Mid- Winter Meeting of the na- 
tional boards and organizations of our 
Congregational Christian denomina- 
tion will be held at Cleveland Hotel, 
Cleveland, Ohio, on February 7-10. 



Rev. Philip Gordon Scott of New 
Haven, Connecticut, will succeed Dr. 
Fred S. Buschmeyer at Mt. Pleasant 
Church, Washington, D. C. In its 
new setting the church will be known 
as the Westmoreland Church. 



Franklinton Winter Institute is in 
session during January. Each of the 
following representatives of the Home 
Boards will give a week of instruction 
at the Institute : Ira D. Black, Philip 
Widenhouse and Stanley U. North. 
Ralph Woodward of Yale will be 
among the instructors also. 



The Annual Study Conference will 
be presented by the Commission on 
Evangelism and Devotional Life in 
First Church, Springfield, Mass., Jan- 
uary 31 - February 1. Lecturers in- 
clude Robert I. Eddy, Fred S. Busch- 
meyer, Allen I. Lorimer and Theo- 
dore M. Green. 



Miss Harriet Summerville, whose 
article appears on page 16, is a mis- 
sionary representing our Reidsville 
Church. Rev. Joe A. French, pastor, 
writes : ' ' Our church folk are proud 
of the work Harriet is doing and be- 
lieve that she is a real able missionary 
working in a field where she has in- 
terest. ' ' 



The Honorable William Zimmer- 
man, Washington, D. C, acting com- 
missioner of U. S. Indian Affairs, and 
Mrs. Harper Sibley, Rochester, N. Y., 
prominent church woman and presi- 
dent of the United Council of Church 
Women, will be among the principal 
speakers at the annual meeting of the 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 

Home Missions Council of North 
America at Buck Hills Falls, Pa., 
January 11-13. 



The 1949 Norfolk Preaching Mis- 
sion will be held January 9-16. Aft- 
ernoon and evening services (2 :30 and 
7:30) will be held in the City Audi- 
torium. The morning Bible Study 
(10:30-11:30) will be held in Ep- 
worth Methodist Church. Speakers 
include Daniel A. Poling, Ralph W. 
Sockman, Henry H. Crane, Roy L. 
Smith, Clovis G. Chapped, Walter H. 
Judd, J. Wallace Hamilton, Miss Mar- 
garet Applegarth and Bishop Hughes. 
Regional noonday services will be held 
in local churches. 



A letter has been sent to President 
Truman from the Congregational 
Christian Council for Social Action 
expressing the earnest hope that the 
military not play a dominant role in 
our relations with other countries and 
commending his insistence upon the 
development of atomic energy pri- 
marily by civilians. It was signed 
jointly by Arthur S. Wheelock, Chair- 
man of -the Council's International 
Relations Committee and Herman F. 
Reissig, its secretary. The letter ex- 
pressed good wishes for the Presi- 
dent as he faces heavy responsibilities 
and expresses the wish that in the 
event of any changes in the official 
family Mr. Truman will "look for 
leaders whose background and habit 
of mind completely exempt them from 
the charge that they 'think primarily 
in military terms.' " 



The National Executive of the 
American Christian Palestine Com- 
mittee, meeting in executive session 
on December 30, unanimously adopted 
a resolution hailing the new State of 
Israel and its increasing- internation- 
al recognition, and called for the con- 
solidation of a separate political ex- 
istence for the Arab part of Pales- 
tine. The strongly - worded resolu- 
tion also demanded the withdrawal of 
all invading Arab forces from the 
State of Israel and called upon Great 
Britain to forsake her unfriendly at- 
titude toward the new Israel. Prais- 
ing the government of Israel for the 
"scrupulous manner" in which it re- 
spected the sanctity of the shrines and 
Holy Places, the Christian group espe- 
cially singled out the recent Israel ac- 
tion which ' ' in the midst of a war . . . 
offered all facilities for the Christians 
in Israel to celebrate the Holy Day of 
Christmas in keeping with the dignity 
and tradition of that revered festi- 
val." The statement was issued by 



January 6, 1949. 

the Rev. Karl Baehr, Executive Sec- 
retary and Dr. Carl Herman Voss, 
Chairman of the Executive Council. 



SUFFOLK CHURCHES MAKE 
HISTORY. 

The following article was carried 
by the Suffolk News-Herald, and the 
Norfolk Virginian-Pilot announcing 
an unusual Watchnight Service which 
was held in Suffolk : 

"Presbyterians, Methodists, Epis- 
copalians, Congregational Christians, 
and others will join in the celebra- 
tion of the Holy Communion as the 
central feature in a union Watch- 
Night Service to be held in Main 
Street Methodist Church, Friday 
night at 11 :00 and closing at mid- 
night. A Southern Baptist minister 
and an Episcopal Church rector will 
stand alongside clergymen of other 
churches of Suffolk as the Lord 's Sup- 
per is administered to their united 
congregations. 

"The spirit of community unity 
and brotherhood will be further sym- 
bolized by the presence of a Jewish 
Rabbi — Dr. Murray Kantor — and 
members of his congregation. 

"A committee from the Suffolk- 
Nansemond Ministers ' Association 
composed of the Rev. John A. Wins- 
low, rector of St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church; Dr. John G. Truitt, pastor 
of the Suffolk Christian Church; and 
the Rev. John Blakemore, pastor of 
Main Street Methodist Church, is in 
charge of arrangements. It is believed 
that in the more than two hundred 
years of Suffolk history this is the 
first time such a service has been held. 

"Combined choirs of the Suffolk 
churches will assemble one hour be- 
fore the time of the service, and hold 
a rehearsal of a special musical num- 
ber in readiness for the opening of 
the service at 11 :00 o'clock. Mr. Da- 
vid C. Babcock, minister of music of 
the host church will preside at the 
organ ; and the host pastor, the Rev. 
ohn Blakemore, will preside over the 
service of worship, which will be 
broadcast over WLPM. The services 
will be open to all whether one wishes 
to receive the elements of the Holy 
Supper or not. 

"For the convenience of the as- 
sembled congregation in following the 
service the order of serving the Lord 's 
Supper will be that which is printed 
in the Methodist Hymnal. The min- 
isters have expressed the desire that 
members of all faiths will feel free to 
attend the service closing the old year 
and welcoming in the new. ' ' 



January 6, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Three. 



RELIEF AND RECONSTRUCTION. 

[Memorandum concerning world relief 
formerly done by the denomination's 

C. W.V.R.] 

Information received from Dr. A. 

D. Stauffacher, Executive Secretary 
of The Missions Council of the Con- 
gregational Christian Churches, sets 
forth the plans of our denomination 
for continuing the work being done 
for world relief through the Congre- 
gational Christian Committee for War 
Victims and Reconstruction. 

Promotion for CWVR as such end- 
ed December 31, 1948, but the tragic 
need for relief still exists to an alarm- 
ing extent throughout the world. The 
General Council has provided for a 
budget of $1,000,000 annually for Re- 
lief and Reconstruction as a part of 
"Our Christian World Mission." In 
state conferences outside of the South- 
ern Convention these funds will be 
provided through a unified budget. 
Since our funds are all designated in 
the Convention, we will give to Relief 
and Reconstruction as a designated 
special just as we have contributed 
to CWVR. 

Beginning January 1, 1949, the 
Mission Board of the Conention will 
promote Relief and Reconstruction 
gifts for world relief just as it has 
through CWVR. These gifts will be 
a part of the special gift portion of 
the Mission Board budget adopted by 
the Convention at its session in 1948, 
but not a part of the apportionment. 

Many of our churches have con- 
tributed to CWVR through the sacri- 
ficial Giving Plan and by special of- 
ferings. These should continue for 
Relief and Reconstruction. Enve- 
lopes will be provided by The Mis- 
sions Council, 287 Fourth Avenue, 
New York 10, N. Y., for these gifts 
as in the past for CWVR. Please 
write The Missions Council for enve- 
lopes and promotional literature for 
Belief and Reconstruction. 

Many of our churches and individ- 
uals have contributed CARE pack- 
ages and other relief gifts to individ- 
uals in wartorn areas. Others have 
contributed money generously to 
Church World Service and other non- 
and inter-denominational relief agen- 
cies. These gifts did not receive de- 
nominational credit 

In the future all such gifts (CARE 
packages, etc.) should he sent through 
denominational channels. These gifts 
will be credited to the local church for 
Relief and Reconstruction. 

This is important — Churches and 
individuals are urged to send Relief 
and Reconstruction giving to what- 
ever purpose (such as CARE and 



other non- or inter - denominational 
agencies) as well as regular gifts for 
world relief as a part of Relief and 
Reconstruction through the Conven- 
tion. Designated gifts will go to the 
purpose designated and credit will be 
given therefor to the Convention and 
churches from which they come. 

It is urged that all Relief and Re- 
construction gifts be sent to The 
Southern Convention Office, Elon Col- 
lege, N. 'C... though they may be sent 
direct to Mr. Harold Belcher, Trea- 
surer of Relief and Reconstruction 
Funds, 14 Beacon Street, Boston 8, 
Massachusetts. 

Wm. T. Scott, 
Executive Secretary, Mission Board. 



GIFTS FOR C.W.V.R. 

Mrs. Hawley Willson, Executive 
Secretary of the Congregational 
Christian Committee for War Victims 
and Reconstruction has sent an ur- 
gent memorandum to all Conference 
Chairmen asking them to notify 
churches and church organizations 
that gifts to C.W.V.R. must be in the 
hands of the Convention Treasurer no 
later than January 15 to count on the 
1948 goal. 

Church treasurers of our Conven- 
tion are urged to mail their church 
contributions without delay to: Dr. 
William T. Scott, Supt., Southern 
Convention of Congregational Chris- 
tian Churches, Elon College, N. C. 

Treasurers of Women's Societies of 
our North Carolina Churches should 
send their "Thank Offering" contri- 
butions to: Miss Susie D. Allen, 
Treasurer, 612 West Lane Street, Ral- 
eigh, N. . 

Treasurers of Women 's Societies of 
the Eastern Virginia Churches should 
send their "Thank Offering" contri- 
butions to: Mrs. W. B. Williams, 
(Continued on page 11.) 



The Christian Sun 

Established 1844 by Rev. Daniel W. Kerr. 

A Religious Weekly for the Home, devoted 
to the interests of the Kingdom as represent- 
ed by the Congregational Christian Churches. 
Our Principles. 

1. The Lord Jesus Christ is the only 
Head of the Church. 

2. Christian is a sufficient name for the 
Church. 

3. The Bible is a sufficient rule of faith 
and practice. 

4. Christian character is a sufficient test 
of fellowship and Church membership. 

5. The right of private judgment and the 
liberty of conscience is a right and a privi- 
lege that should be accorded to and exer- 
cised by all. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor Eobert Lee House 

Managing Editor John T. Kernodle 

Associate Editors — J. B. Allen, H. G. Coun- 
cil Jr., J. H. Dollar, F. B. Eutsler, 8. C. 
Harrell, B. M. Kimball, B. V. Hunger, 
J. E. Neese, W. W. Sloan, H. 8. Smith. 
Corresponding Editors — J. F. Apple (E. N. 
C), W. M. Stevens (N. C. & Va.), F. C. 
Lester (W. N. C), J. G. Truitt (E. Va.), 
R. A. Whitten (V. Va.). 
Departmental Editors — Wm. T. Scott, Con- 
vention; Mrs. W. J. Andes, Women's 
Work; Miss Elizabeth Chicoine, Young 
People's Work; Mrs. B. L. House, Chil- 
dren; L. E. Smith, Christian Education; 
Clias. D. Johnston, Orphanage; H. 8. 
Hardcastle, Sunday School. 
Board of Publications — W. J. Andes, 8. E. 
Madren, W. M. Stevens, W. E. Wisseman, 
T. F. Wright. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Six Months $1-00 

One Year $2.00 

Published by the Board of Publications, 
agent for the Southern Convention of Con- 
gregational Christian Churches, and printed 
every Thursday except the last in June and 
December by the Central Publishing Co., 
Inc., Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Post 
Office at Richmond, Va., July 25, 1922, un- 
der Act of March 3, 1879. 

Remittances for subscriptions should be sent 
to the Convention Office, Elon College, 
N. C. 

All other matters of business should be ad- 
dressed to The Christian Sun, 1536 East 
Broad Street, Richmond, 19, Va. 

Contributions should reach the editor at 
3206 Grove Avenue, Richmond, 21, Va 



The Christian Sun Subscription Blank 

FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 
FIFTY ISSUES FOR $2.00 

Dr. Wm. T. Scott 
Elon College, N. C. 

Enclosed find $ for which please send The Christian 

Sun for one year to 

Address 

Name 

[ ] New [ ] Renewal 



Page Four. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 6, 1949. 




\S JvjXSSAGE, 



MAN OF THE YEARS. 

One influential publication has followed its estab- 
lished custom of announcing a "Man of the Year." From 
the American view point, only a few people will quar- 
rel with Time's selection of President Truman for this 
current distinction. 

This modest publication would, however, submit 
another name; man of the year and of the years: Jesus 
of Nazareth. By every adequate test, he is the man of 
the year and of the century. His influence is limited to 
no one country, year or century. His popularity is con- 
tingent on no particular election or loss of election. In- 
deed, Jesus Christ seems to grow morally and spiritually 
taller with each succeeding generation. He increases 
with the ages. Make way, all ye succeeding generations, 
for Jesus the Christ! 

Dr. John R. Mott speaks out of a wide experience 
when he declares that "there are today millions more 
men and women than a few years ago who have come 
into an authentic, firsthand knowledge and experience of 
Christ." He concludes that "Christ has never been bet- 
ter preached and better lived than at the present fateful 
time in lands where we may have least expected it." 

Yes, for millions of people Jesus has been the man 
of the year. In his name the hungry have been fed 
and the naked clothed. Remembering that Jesus de- 
clared that those who lose their lives for his sake find 
them, thousands of Christians have believed that if they 
are to deserve his name they must give themselves fully 
in the kind of service which Jesus rendered to his fellows. 
Through Jesus has come to multitudes a vision of an 
eternal life of moral and spiritual transformation with 
the love and adoration of God as at once its means and 
its goal. 

Jesus remains the man of the hour. Every hour 
countless comrades look to him for guidance, and go 
forward with the discharge of difficult duties in his 
strength. The sun never sets on his vast empire. As 
crucial problems arise in many lands, solutions will be 
sought and found in the spirit and teachings of Christ. 
For six months Christians all over the land will be study- 
ing the life of Christ. Out of this reverent and pains- 
taking study will come new insights and achievements. 
Son of Man, Son of God, Man of the ages and the hours ; 
his going forth is from the ends of the earth. 



TIME MARCHES ON. 

Amsterdam and Columbus should assure 1948 a 
permanent niche in religious history. The continued 
ministry of the churches through overseas relief was im- 
pressive and praiseworthy. A substantial number of 
missionaries, thoroughly furnished unto every good 
work, went out to represent Christ and his church on 
distant frontiers. New and more adequate churches 
were erected to the glory of God. These special em- 




phases are in addition to the regular but massive pro- 
grams of the various churches and denominations. 

Many heart-warming and soul-stirring events have 
been reported. Here is an announcement that the Rev. 
Jacob Deshazer, member of the 1942 Doolittle Tokyo 
raiders, has arrived in Yokohoma as a missionary. The 
35-year-old ex-Air Force bombadier went back to Japan 
"to return good for evil" and to realize a decision made 
during 34 months confinement in China — "to rescue the 
people through love of God." 

But all is not well. Few of our churches are filled 
regularly to capacity. Prayer and church attendance 
have been crowded off the agenda in countless homes. 
Many nominal Christians have no consistent program of 
stewardship. Consequently our Kingdom enterprises 
progress at a retarded rate. Maximum efforts are re- 
quired to produce minimum results. The expansion of 
the church at home and abroad is notable only by the 
exception rather than the rule. 

The 1948 Report of the State Board of Corrections 
of the Commonwealth of Virginia states, "It is truly 
remarkable that the number of commitments to jail, on 
charges involving drunkenness, continues to increase 
month after month and year after year. The total com- 
mitments for being drunk, or drunk and disorderly for 
the first nine months of this fiscal year totaled 36,157, 
or an average of slightly more than 4,000 per month. 
These figures, of course, do not include those confined 
in overnight police lockups for the various towns and 
cities of the state for which the figures are not available." 
In addition, 3,085 were confined for operating motor 
vehicles under the influence of intoxicants during the 
first nine months of this fiscal year. In 1943, 14,902 
people were sent to Virginia jails for liquor offenses and 
1,003 of this number were charged with driving under 
the influence. In 1947, just four years later, 46,614 Vir- 
ginians were committed for drunkenness and 4,155 were 
charged with drunken driving. 

Communism abroad and secularism at home threat- 
en the foundations of our long-established gains. "What 
shall we say to these things ? If God be for us, who can 
be against us? . . . Nay, in all things we are more 
than conquerors, through him that loved us." 



NEW YEAR OPTIMISM. 

In the chorus of gloomy predictions as the New 
Year approaches there comes a refreshing note of opti- 
mism in a statement made by Arthur S. Wheelock of 
White Plains, New York, Chairman of the International 
Relations Department of the Council for Social Action: 
"Despite the perils of the present situation there is in the 
Christian faith a basis for continuing and realistic peace 
action. It is important for Christian churchmen to keep 
a clear perspective today in the struggle for world peace 
and justice and not yield to the mood of despair. For 



January 6, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Five. 



Christians, a premature despair is 
even less excusable than a premature 
optimism. ' ' 

' ' The tide has begun to turn toward 
free, cooperative societies in Europe, 
and the constructive elements of the 
European Recovery Program have be- 
gun to count. It provides encourag- 
ing evidence of America's willingness 
to meet her international responsibil- 
ities. • 

"The atom bomb, China, Palestine, 
and many other problems still press 
for wise solutions. There is a long 
way to go before a world of free men 
can stand on their own feet, healthy, 



strong and without fear or despair. 
But Christmas has reminded us that 
the saving power of God's love is still 
at work in the world. Christ was 
born in a time of terror and darkness, 
but He came with tidings of great joy 
for all people, tidings that the Al- 
mighty and Everlasting God has en- 
tered human life. 

"Christians can go forward with 
hope and courage. We do not know 
what the year 1949 will mean for 
mankind, but, we who believe that in 
Jesus of Nazareth God revealed His 
love and power, may be sure that His 
purpose is finally beyond defeat." 




Our Christian Orientation and Prospect 

By Rev. Howell D. Davies, D. D. 
Mid-West Regional Secretary of The Missions Council. 

Our simple, common conception of 
the Kingdom of God is an order in 
which God is recognized, in which 
plans, motives and goals are referred 
to his will, a world of changed char- 
acter as well as ideal blueprints, a 
world of prevailing ideas like those of 
Jesus. 

It would seem a simple thing to get 
one's bearings with reference to this 
order, but the very first glance around 
reveals an almost hopeless confusion 
of understanding and counsels. The 
Barthians say we should sit back and 
watch God do things. There is a babel 
of opinions and tongues as to what is 
Christian and unchristian. There is 
a sickening superficiality of compre- 
hension, standards and the conception 
of Christianity as of the spirit rather 
than of the letter. There is disillu- 
sionment. Standards considered un- 
changeable by one generation are 
flung aside by the new generation 
which considers itself as good as the 
old. There is cynicism because of 
intransigent human nature and hu- 
manity's fairly regular lapse into 
heathenism after a try with some no- 
ble ideals. There is the ' ' well, I give 
it up" feeling in the presence of diffi- 
cult tasks and difficult people. Fu- 
tility hangs over Christian workers 
like a pall and they wonder and ask, 
"Are we after all accomplishing any- 
thing?" 

I. 

How can a Christian get his bear- 
ings in a hurricane like that of our 
generation — of war, materialism, race 
prejudice and a thousand varieties 
of selfishness, individual and social? 
Without bearings a Christian has no 
heart to carry on. Here are some sug- 
gestions for him as a serious but ques- 
tioning worker in the vineyard of the 



REV. HOWELL D. DAVIES, D. D. 

Lord, especially the larger vineyard 
of the world of many countries and 
many peoples. 

1. Let him take himself in hand. 
He just can't sit back without ceas- 
ing to be a Christian. He knows that 
God can be doing only as he and his 
fellow Christians are doing. He is 
like a bicycle. He must keep going 
or fall. He has to make his choice be- 
tween going on with his hope, faith 
and effort or cease calling himself a 
Christian. This consideration should 
be of some help to him as he remem- 
bers that to the degree that he stops, 
so does the Kingdom. 

2. Let him choose between two be- 
liefs — that the Kingdom is surely 
coming, however slowly, or that the 
world is headed for the pit. 

3. Let him remember what has 
happened regularly with the King- 
dom since the day of J esus, so that he 
will know what to expect in the way 
of faithlessness, desertion, hindrances, 
frustrations, and open hostility, as 



well as victories and sweeping ad- 
vances. 

4. Let him fill his mind with cer- 
tain axioms such as : Truth crushed 
to earth shall rise again; clouds can 
hide but cannot blot out the sun ; 
Christ calls nobody to go on a fool's 
errand, though even the twelve dis- 
ciples felt that way at times; Rome 
wasn't built in a day, much less can 
the Kingdom of God ;. a sovereign nev- 
er abdicates, so the Christian won't 
quit until God does. 

5. Let him appraise afresh "the 
power of God unto salvation. ' ' 

6. Let him remember that the 
struggle at the beginning of the proc- 
cess (and that is just where we are — 
we are closer to the cross end than the 
crown end) is just as important as the 
pre-victory effort, anticipation and 
thrill. It is less exciting to dig around 
in the vineyard and to prune dead 
branches, but it is just as important as 
gathering the fruit. 

7. Let him know how to appraise 
the difficulties. They are so great 
that only the grace of God channeled 
through consecrated followers of Je- 
sus is "sufficient for these things." 
Literature, educational techniques, ra- 
dio and other things are useful tools, 
but they alone cannot Christianize 
the world. Any optimism based on 
underestimated difficulties is inviting 
disillusionment. 

8. Let him train his eyes to see 
where God is winning out and have 
Sherwood Eddy's joy as he said, "I 
saw God do it." There are individ- 
uals, Christian groups and churches 
powerfully moved of God. 

II. What Is the Prospect Before Us? 

1. Continued recovery and gain in 
the war-torn countries. The fellow- 
ship of the Christian churches in Ger- 
many, organized under Niemoeller, 
represents 35,000,000 Protestants. 
This "cooperative fellowship of Chris- 
tian Churches" was formed March 
10, 1948, the first time for virtually 
all non-Roman Catholic churches to 
be related to each other in a co- 
operative movement. The first post- 
war missionary went from Germany 
April 1, to China. The German dele- 
gates to Whitby last year declared 
there was no hope for Germany ex- 
cept in the Gospel. They reported 
"Collections for missions were reach- 
ing phenomenal totals ' ' and meetings 
were crowded to the doors. Pour 
times as many missionary candidates 
were forthcoming as could be ac- 
cepted. Of Germany's pre-war 1,560 
missionaries, 400 are still at work, 
(Continued on page 10.) 



Page Six. THE CHRISTIAN SUN 

CONT RIB UTIONS I 



SUFFOLK LETTER. 

At Christmas time the pastor of a 
good and friendly people has many 
things to make him happy, to bless 
his own life, and to bring joy to the 
home in the parsonage. But how 
about the minister who is giving full 
time service such as our Convention 
Superintendent, or our College Pres- 
ident, or anyone of several fulltime 
secretaries in our denomination who 
give of their best throughout the year 
and miss much that comes to the pas- 
tor and his home at Christmastime? 
I have never known how much or how 
little they may or may not share in 
the overflowing kindness of their peo- 
ple at such times. I am afraid they 
miss something to which they are en- 
titled. For instance, we may rally to 
the Christian Orphanage, and make 
glad the hearts of the Superintendent 
and matrons by our devotion to the 
Orphanage, but isn't there something 
"personally extra" that makes one 
feel that one's constituency appreci- 
ates one? Well, I do not know. I 
have a feeling that somebody could 
wonder at times. Let's you and T, as 
we read these lines, sort of make a 
mental note and find some occasion to 
say to our "beloved servants" a kind- 
ly thank you that will make their 
hearts glad. And it is not at all nec- 
essary to wait until next Christmas. 

It takes so little sometimes to lift 
a load. And just as little in neglect, 
or unkind criticism, or unthoughtful- 
ness can add considerable to life's 
burdens. If all of us could only re- 
member to be grateful and loving how 
much happier our own lives would be, 
and how much more joy there would 
be for others with whom we come in 
contact. So often we are not our best 
selves, for at no time would we throw 
a stumblingblock in anyone's path — 
we would not think of doing so, but 
there is always that inner battle with- 
in ourselves. Paul knew it and con- 
fessed it, "For what I would do, that 
I do not ; but what I hate, that I do. 
. . . When I would do good evil is 
present." Perhaps in the very be- 
ginning of this New Year we should 
all think about these things. When 
Paul observed his own wretchedness 
and wondered how he was to be deliv- 
ered from it a light shone on his page 
and into his heart, and he said, ' f I 
thank God through Jesus Christ our 
Lord." 



Paul was not made smaller by look- 
ing in at the citadel of self, and then 
looking up to Him for whom he was 
willing to suffer all things, but rath- 
er he became big enough to catch the 
spirit of greatness as few mortals have 
ever caught it. Let us set out in this 
another year to see how much we can 
do for others. What good things we 
can say about them. How much good 
we can see in our Church, our College, 
our Christian Sun, our Mission 
Board, our Board of Superannuation, 
our Board of Christian Education to 
praise. Let us see how much we can 
help our Superintendent in all his 
work, his goings, and comings, his 
planning and promotion, and all the 
work ad workers in our Convention 
office. May Ave not begin right at 
home with a spirit of appreciation and 
gratitude? No good advice or coun- 
sel ; no, nor New Year's resolutions, 
will matter much unless we have the 
spirit of Christ — unless like Paul we 
come to the way of knowing that he 
is our Deliverer, our Saviour and our 
Lord. Paul put it, "Making melody 
in your heart . . . giving thanks al- 
ways for all things unto God. ' ' 

John G. Truitt. 



NEWS FROM THE VALLEY. 

The Committee on the Ministry and 
ginia Valley Central Conference met 
at Bethel Church, near Elkton, Va., at 
Bethel Church near Elkton, Va., at 
6 :45 o 'clock, Thursday evening, De- 
cember 30, for the purpose of exami- 
nation of James W. Madren (son of 
Rev. and Mrs. Silas E. Madren), min- 
isterial student at Elon College, whose 
application for license to preach had 
been duly received. The Committee 
on the Ministry voted unanimously, 
recommending that James be licensed. 
The Executive Committee acted upon 
the recommendation and authorized 
the president of the Conference to 
proceed with the ceremony of licens- 
ing of the candidate. 

A number of friends had assembled 
at the church for the occasion and 
following a brief worship period, the 
Rev. R. E. Newton preached the ser- 
mon, the Rev. Clyde Koon read the 
scripture, the Rev. Roy D. Coulter 
gave the charge, and the Rev. S. E. 
Madren offered the prayer, following 
which the president of the Conference, 
Rev. Robert A. Whitten, licensed the 
candidate to preach the Gospel of our 



January 6, 1949. 

§ 

I 

Lord Jesus Christ wherever the provi- 
demce of God may call him. 

It is our earnest prayer that God 
may call laborers into the harvest that 
by the power of His Spirit and the 
service of His ministers there may be 
light instead of darkness, peace in- 
stead of war and healing for the 
world's wounds. We pray also that 
those whom God calls and sends forth 
into His vineyard may ever prove 
faithful to the sacred task. 

Robt. A. Whitten. 



PEN PORTRAITS OF THE DISCIPLES 
OF CHRIST. 
I. PETER. 

By Samuel Lawrence Johnson, 
Pastor, Park Manor Church, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Simon Peter was the son of a suc- 
cessful Galilean fisherman named 
John. He was born in the little town 
of Bethsaida which was on the north- 
west side of the Sea of Chinnereth 
just to the south of Capernaum which 
later became Peter's home. Bethsai- 
da may be translated to mean "house 
of fishing." 

Peter, like his brother, Andrew, was 
originally a friend and follower of 
John the Baptist before coming to 
know Jesus and it is more than prob- 
able that he witnessed the baptism of 
our Lord. He was married and in 
later years his wife was his com- 
panion on his missionary journeys. 

This man Symeon, the Greek name 
by which he was known, was vigorous, 
courageous, resourceful and partic- 
ularly during his younger years, very 
impulsive. Shortly after their first 
meeting he was the companion of Je- 
sus on a journey through Galilee but 
when the journey had been completed 
Peter returned to his work as a 
fisherman and did not actually accept 
the call to "follow" the Master until 
after the miracle which was wrought 
in his own home : the healing of his 
mother-in-law. 

After Peter had accepted his "call" 
to the discipleship it is likely Jesus 
staved resrularly in his home when- 
ever he visited Capernaum. 

Peter's journeys carried him to 
Svria, Asia Minor, the ancient city 
of Babvlon. and finally Rome. There 
is a le,<rend that Peter lived for twen- 
tv-five years in Rome and served as 
minister of the church there but this 
is not historicallv substantiated; in 
fact there is evidence to the contrary. 
We do not know how he met his death 
but it is quite certain that he was 
martyred shortly after a great fire in 
Rome during July of 46 A. D. 



January 6, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Seven. 



News of Elon College 



By President L. E. Smith 



CHRISTIAN LIVING. 

I. IN THE HOME. 

Superintendent Scott invited me to 
attend a special meeting of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Western North 
Carolina Christian Conference. The 
committee met in Asheboro in Decem- 
ber, 1948. Among other items of 
business, the present status of The 
Christian Sun was discussed. Mr. 
W. H. Freeman, a member of the 
committee suggested that in his judg- 
ment, members of the church would 
be glad to have more written in The 
Christian Sun on the subject of 
Christian living. This occurred to me 
as a good suggestion and I am pre- 
paring a series of foTir articles on this 
subject for publication in The Chris- 
tian Sun: 

1. Christian Living in the Home. 

2. Christian Living in the Commun- 
ity. 

3. Christian Living in the Church. 

4. Christian Living in the World. 

This article deals with Christian 
living in the home. What do you 
mean by Christian living? What 
kind of living is Christian living'? 
How does a Christian conduct him- 
self in his home ? How does he spend 
his days? What does he do day in 
and day out? 

Assuming that he is the head of the 
house, the father of the family, his 
first duty is to make sure that he is a 
Christian, then, to inform himself as 
to what is expected of him and what 
his duties and responsibilities are. 

His principle source of information 
. is the Bible, the record of the revela- 
tion of God to man. In the Bible, 
the way of life is made plain so that 
no man need err therein. If he is a 
Christian, he will make the Bible his 
daily companion. He will hide its 
truths in his heart that the strength 
of the Almighty may augment his 
strength that he will not fail in any 
undertaking. No Christian will rely 
on his own strength but will look to 
God for ability to achieve in his name. 

He will surely learn that his help 
is in God — that men have found God 
in prayer and that if he wants to 
know God and His power promised 
to man, he must come to Him in pray- 
er. God is our strength and help. 
Prayer is the means by which He 



may be found. If a man shall come to 
God in prayer believing, not doubt- 
ing, he shall have those things for 
which he prays. The professed Chris- 
tian who neglects to read his Bible 
and to pray daily- need not be dis- 
tressed when he fails to overcome 
temptation but rather is overcome by 
temptation. Faith is the victory that 
overcomes the world. Prayer is the 
power that changes the world. 

There are simple fruits of Christian 
living that should be self-evident: 
gentleness, kindness, patience and for- 
bearance. The true Christian will 
hold himself in tow, control his tem- 
per and bridle his tongue. He will 
not behave himself unseemly. His 
language will be chaste, never harsh 
or profane. He will not be given to 
idle words but to sanity and to good 
judgment approved unto God. It will 
be his purpose to portray the spirit of 
Christ in his daily living. 

He will realize fully his responsi- 
bility in the home and to the other 
members of his family — that it is his 
responsibility to instruct in the things 
of the spirit, to help to make plain the 
way of life and to guide all members 
of his household in the ways of right- 
eousness, himself leading the way. As 
one of old he will say from his heart, 
"As for me and my house we will 
serve the Lord. ' ' 

In this day when there seems to be 
so many enemies of the home — di- 
vorce, strong drink, infidelity, use- 
less extravagance, sabbath desecra- 
tion, and down right sin, a man who 
would be a Christian in his own home 
and keep his home Christian needs 
fresh supplies of grace daily. He 
must have the conscious presence of 
Christ and the sure guidance of His 
spirit that he himself may evade the 
pitfalls of life and guide his family 
and home safely through the treach- 
erous snares of time. 

Yes, there is such a thing as Chris- 
tian living even in this materialistic 
age. It is possible for a man to live 
the Christian life in his home and in 
society. Bible reading, prayer, Chris- 
tian consideration, kindness and love, 
are unmistakable evidences of the 
Christian life. May these Christian 
virtues be found in you for they add 
up unto eternal life and to everlasting 
happiness. 



APPORTIONMENT GIVING. 

The first of the New Year is a good 
time for resolutions. Resolutions may 
be kept or they may be broken. I 
believe that it was Benjamin Frank- 
lin who said, "I spend New Year's 
day making resolutions and the re- 
maining 364 days breaking them." 
Resolutions amount to very little un- 
less they are put into effect. This is 
a good time for the Sunday schools 
and churches of the Convention to re- 
solve to give their college, the only 
institution of higher learning that 
our Southern Convention has, more 
generous support. We close 1948 
short of the goal set by the Conven- 
tion. This is most unfortunate. In 
this day of higher salaries and cost of 
operation, increased funds are re- 
quired if the college is to balance its 
budget and stay out of the red. 

Some of our churches set good ex- 
amples. They pay their entire ap- 
portionments for the college at the 
beginning of the year. This is advan- 
tageous to the church and the college 
and makes for more satisfactory op- 
eration as the days pass. The college 
expresses gratitude for the support 
given by our Sunday schools and 
churches during 1948 and expresses 
the hope that this same generosity 
will continue through 1949. 

Churches. 

Previously reported $11,751.13 

Eastern N. C. Conference: 

Sanford 100.00 

Wake Chapel S. S 20.01 

Eastern Va. Conference: 

Dendron S. S 3.30 

Eosemont 50.00 

Suffolk S. 8 40.97 

N. C. & Va, Conference: 

New Lebanon S. S 8.50 

Pleasant Grove 8. S 6.19 

Western N. C. Conference : 
Shady Grove 1.00 

Total $ 229.97 

Grand total $11,981.10 



Reports received by the United 
Board for Christian Colleges in China 
indicate that the majority of the fac- 
ulty members of China's Christian 
colleges are remaining at their posts, 
despite recent Communist military 
victories which have placed some of 
these institutions in Communist ter- 
ritory. Administrators of these mis- 
sion-supported colleges have reported 
that they plan to carry on their work 
as long as they are permitted sub- 
stantial academic and religious free- 
dom. 



Morale is faith in the man at the 
top. — Albert 8. Johnstone. 



Page Eight. THE CHRISTIAN SUN 




A LETTER FROM THE JACKSONS. 

Shaowu, Fukien, China, 
December 9, 1948. 
Dear Friends: 

It lias been a long time since we 
have written to you. The past few 
months have been full of changed 
plans for the present and uncertainty 
about the future. According to the 
radio, the Communists are getting 
closer each day to Nanking. What 
the fall of Nanking will mean to 
North Fukien is anybody's guess. It 
is predicted that bandit bands in the 
mountains may take advantage of the 
opportunity to come into the town 
on pillaging expeditions. Shaowu is 
a sizeable town (population, about 
400,000), but there are only a few 
"Peace Preservation" soldiers here. 
There are over 2,000 wounded sol- 
diers quartered in the city who, if 
their pensions are stopped because of 
the fall of the Nanking government, 
may create a serious problem 

If Nanking falls we are not certain 
what effect it will have on us We 
have heard from North China that, at 
present, the Communists, when they 
first arrive, are not molesting foreign- 
ers and are proclaiming freedom of 
religion. The North Fukien churches 
have not yet recovered from the last 
Communist invasion. The withdraw- 
al of foreign financial aid and person- 
nel may prove too much for the in- 
fant churches. So, at present, if evac- 
uation seems necessary, Dorothy and 
Lewis will probably leave (presuma- 
bly for USA), while I stay in Shaowu 
to encourage and help the church in 
its troubles We may have decided on 
some other course of action by the 
time this reaches you, but this is our 
present plan. 

Communist control will probably 
mean the cutting off of all foreign fi- 
nancial support as well as letters, 
newspapers, etc. Our Chinese friends 
say that if I stay they will find some 
way to provide the necessities of life. 
Mrs. Kao, a nurse in the hospital and 
an earnest Christian, said to us re- 
cently: "Please don't leave us. Once 
I had four beautiful children. When 
the hospital was closed because of the 



previous Communist invasion, two of 
them died for lack of medical care. 
The two that are left are so gifted 
and faithful to the church it would 
break my heart to lose them." Sev- 
eral years ago, when her daughter 
Susan was at the point of death from 
plague, her father, not then a Chris- 
tian, asked her what he could do to 
please her and make her well. The 
seven-year-old girl replied, "If you 
will believe in Jesus, I will be very 
happy." This simple request of his 
desperately ill daughter touched the 
father's heart. Susan recovered (a 
rare thing), and Mr. Kao started to 
think about Christianity. Formerly 
in the military, he had spent most of 
his time gambling and living a dis- 
solute life. Now he has returned to 
his home and they are a happy family. 
Several weeks ago Mr. Kao was bap- 
tized and he is a changed man. He 
gives his time and money generously 
to help others. Mrs. Kao said to us, 
' ' The church and the hospital mean a 
great deal to us. If you will not leave 
we will find a way to take care of your 
needs. ' ' 

During the past week we have held 
the annual meeting of the North Fu- 
kien Synod. Dr. Harold Matthews, 
the American Board China secretary, 
and his son, Alden now in the Foo- 
chow Mission, came up river for the 
occasion. The meeting was in many 
ways a discouraging and trying ex- 
perience. As Pastor Huang put it, 
' ' People 's hearts are not at rest now. ' ' 
Remembering the atrocities of the 
past, the present Communist threat 
inspires fear in the hearts of all. The 
atmosphere of our meetings was tense 
— even little decisions were made with 
difficulty. More than one delegate re- 
sorted to tears. The election of a 
chairman of the Executive Board re- 
quired two days. Who would want to 
be the head of a Christian Church 
connected with Americans if the the 
Communists come? The third per- 
son elected finally agreed to take the 
responsibility. 

Some important questions were 
faced and important decisions made, 
however. On Sunday morning a serv- 



Jamuary 6, 1949. 

ice of worship was held in the Bast j 
G-ate Church attended by about 200 
persons. Pastor Liao and I conducted 
the Service of Communion. Several 
new members were received into the 
church. After the service, one of the 
new Christians came up to me and 
said, "Do you remember the big fire 
we had last Christmas at North Gate. 
Our house was burned and you let us 
all stay in the building in front of 
your house. Then the Christians 
raised money and gave to all of us. I 
began to think about Christianity for 
the first time then, and now I am a 
Christian." 

Christmas will soon be with us 
again, but we find it pretty difficult to 
get up any enthusiasm for this us- 
ually joyful occasion. The plight of 
thousands of refugees streaming out 
of the North, the concern of everyone 
for the future makes the heart heavy. 
Every morning a deacon of the East 
Gate Church comes by to ask what is 
the radio news from Nanking. His 
son and family are there in govern- 
ment service and he has had no word 
from them for weeks. 

We all need Christmas more than 
ever this year. For a season we shall 
sing again the beautiful carols telling 
of the birth of the Christ Child. As 
we watch the Christmas play enacted 
by our Han Mei students, we shall 
witness again the proof of God's love 
for sinful, suffering mankind. This 
Christmas, I 'm sure, will help us think 
of ourselves and our work in Shaowu 
as part of the great plan of redemp- 
( Continued on page 14.) 

MISSIONARY OFFERINGS. 

DECEMBER 10-16, 1948. 
Home Missions (Regular). 



Antioch S. S. (V. Va.) $ 4.43 

Linville ( V. Va.) 5.09 

Mt. Carmel S. 8. (E. Va.) 2.96 

Mt. Pleasant (W.N.C.) 7.00 

New Elam S. 8. (B.N.C.) 8.22 

Pope's Chapel S. S. (E.N.C.) . . . 2.25 

Windsor (E. Va.) 130.00 



Total for Home Missions ... $ 159.95 
Foreign Missions (Regular). 

Antioch S. S. (V. Va.) $ 4.43 

Linville (V. Va.) . 5.08 

Mt. Carmel S. S. (E. Va.) 2.95 

Mt. Pleasant (W. . C.) .... 7.00 

New Elam S. S. (E. . C.) 8.22 

Pope's Chapel (E. N. C.) 2.25 

Windsor (E. Va.) 128.00 



Total for Foreign Missions . $ 157.93 



Total period December 10-16 $ 317.88 
Previously reported 10,225.21 



Total since Sept. 1, 1948 . . . $10,543.09 



Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. T. Scott, 
Superintendent. 



January 6, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Nine. 



Church Women at Work 

With Emphasis on Missions 

Mrs. W. J. Andes, Editor 
637 S. Sunset Drive, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



TIMOTHY CHANG VISITS 
WINSTON-SALEM. 

It was our pleasure to have Timo- 
thy Chang as our guest for a short 
visit during the Christmas holidays 
at the parsonage and church in Win- 
ston-Salem. This is one of the privi- 
leges of being a minister 's family. We 
get to meet and entertain many inter- 
esting and likeable people. I would 
certainly count Timothy among these. 

Timothy seemed just one of the 
family all the time, and made me 
want to look forward to the time 
when my son will be that age. He is 
certainly a. person whom you take to 
your heart without realizing it. He is 
an attractive young man with very 
good manners and a fine understand- 
ing and liking for people. Timothy is 
proof of the very good judgement of 
Dick Jackson in picking a young man 
to be the recipient of our scholarship 
fund. He should be of infinite help 
in our Shaowu Mission when he re- 
turns after completing his training in 
the U. S. We pray earnestly that we 
as Christians here may give him some- 
thing worthwhile to carry back home. 

We took Timothy to our Christmas 
services at the church on December 
19. At five o'clock in the evening, we 
all enjoyed an old-fashioned Christ- 
mas with Santa Claus and gifts for 
everyone. Timothy received several 
useful gifts, in addition to the cam- 
era presented to him by the Winston- 
Salem young people. On Sunday 
morning he had been to Pfafftown, 
where the 3 r oung people out there pre- 
sented him with a tennis racquet and 
balls. He was so overcome at receiv- 
ing these gifts he was almost speech- 
less. He did manage to say that he 
didn't deserve them, and hoped that 
while he is in America he would be 
able to repay us by doing something 
for us. We have already been repaid. 

Timothy told us that the young peo- 
ple at Elon College had given him a 
radio prior to his visit to Winston- 
Salem. He felt that his Christmas 
was already full enough to be com- 
plete, but I know that he had a grand 
time the remainder of his holidays. 
He was to visit in Dorothy Jackson's 
home in Washington, D. C, and from 
there he would go to spend a few days 
with the Charles Storrs in Philadel- 



phia before returning to school at 
Duke University. 

It thrills our hearts to know that we 
have a stake in this boy's future. 
Best wishes to Timothy as he begins 
his work again ! Carey Andes. 



YOUR PRESIDENT. 

How old is your President ? Maybe 
she won't tell her age. Maybe she 
will if she thinks she might win a 
"jackpot." Anyway, Mrs. F. C. Les- 
ter, 840 Sunset Ave., Asheboro, N. C, 
our North Carolina President, wants 
to know what society has the oldest 
president, She would also like to 
know the youngest president and the 
president who has held office for the 
longest term of years. If you think 
you can win in either of these cate- 
gories, drop a card to Mrs. Lester. 
Prizes were not mentioned. 



BOOK REVIEWERS. 

China— Twilight or Dawn— Miss Pat- 
tie Lee Coghill, Route 4, Hender- 
son, N. C, and Mrs. Russell Powell, 
411 Woodlawn Ave., Greensboro, 
N. C. 

On Our Own Doorstep — Mrs. Bernard 
Munger, 232 McCauley St., Chapel 
Hill, N. C, and Mrs. W. W. Sloan, 
Elon College, N. C. (The Sloans 
made a visit to Porto Rico during 
Christmas vacation, so she should 
have first-hand information.) 



FINANCIAL REPORT. 

The following is the first quarter 
financial report of 1948-49 of the Wo- 
man's Mission Board of the North 
Carolina Congregational Christian 
Conference, for quarter ending De- 
cember 15, 1948 : 

Albemarle $ 31.02 

Amelia 2.50 

Apple's Chapel 82.50 

Asheboro 37.50 

Auburn 4.20 

Belew Creek 9.23 

Berea 50.00 

Bethel 16.00 

Beulah 36.38 

Burlington 317.94 

Carolina 13.30 

Chapel Hill 20.00 

Church of Wide Fellowship 49.30 

Concord 16.25 

Durham 106.22 

Elon College 196.35 

Erskine Memorial 47.50 



Flint Hill (R) 18.35 

Puller's Chapel 25.00 

Greensboro, First Church . 212.04 
Greensboro, Palm Street . 61.00 

Haw River 26.25 

Henderson 89.25 

High Point 7.20 

Hine's Chapel 122.52 

Hopedale 13.00 

Ingram, Va. . : 47.00 

Liberty, N. C 5.00 

Liberty, Vance 103.80 

Mebane 15.00 

Monticello 41.05 

Mount Auburn 72.96 

Mount Bethel 5.35 

Mount Zion 16.00 

New Hope 16.20 

Pleasant Grove, N. C. ... 13.05 

Pleasant Grove, Va 33.25 

Pleasant Hill 28.68 

Pleasant Ridge (G) 63.00 

Pleasant Ridge (R) 35.39 

Raleigh 70.00 

Ramseur 13.00 

Reidsville 206.00 

Sanford 64.50 

Shallow Ford 58.86 

Shallow Well 68.11 

Smithwood 2.30 

Turner s Chapel 17.50 

Union, N. C 78.00 

Union, Va 35.00 

Wake Chapel 50.00 

Winston-Salem 30.00 

Youngsville 19.00 

$2,819.00 

Young People. 

Durham $ 15.71 

Greensboro, First 39.05 

Turner's Chapel 10.00 

. 64.76 

Willing Workers. 

Durham $26.02 

Elon College 60 

Greensboro, First 12.54 

Ingram .80 

39.96 

Cradle Roll. 

Durham $ 6.36 

Greensboro, First 11.91 

18.27 

Miscellaneous. 
Conference Offering (Asheboro) 104.69 

Total Receipts $3,046.68 

Disbursements. 

Conference Speaker $ 25.00 

United Council of Church 

Women (Programs) . . . 5.00 

Board Meeting 13.40 

Literature Dept. (Packets) 15.37 

Expense of President 

(Milwaukee Conference) 100.00 

Friendship Boxes (CWVR) 15.00 

Puerto Rico (Young Peo- 
ple's Project) 30.00 

$203.77 
Mrs. W. V. Leathers, Trea- 
surer, Woman's Mission 
Board of Southern Con- 
vention, for: 

Thank Offering $1,700.08 

Life Memberships 50.00 

Elon Orphanage 10.00 

Shaowu Mission 5.50 

Missions (Gen'l Fund) 1,077.33 

— $3,046.68 

Susie D. Allen, 

Treasurer. 



Page Ten. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 6, 1949. 



ZZZ2ZZZZZZZZZ ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ2ZZZZZZZZ2ZZZZZZZZZ ZZZZZZZZZZZZZ ZZZZZZ 

FOR THE CHILDREN 

Mrs. R. L. House, Editor 



A happy New Year to all my read- 
ers — big and small ! I 'm writing you 
on New Year 's Day . By the time some 
of you read this, you will have gone 
back to school and others of you will 
be enjoying your Christmas toys. I 
do hope that you have put some of 
them away for a special time or when 
you are sick or have company. It 
makes Christmas last longer ! Here is 
a prayer for putting toys away : 
"Dear God, who is the friend of all 
children, we thank Thee for Christ- 
mas and it's joys and play. Now we 
tuck away some of our treasures and 
help us remember to share our toys 
and be friendly all the day. Amen. ' ' 

Today we have taken down our tree. 
It always seems sad but then I think 
of the many times they have been 
used and the happy family occa- 
sions. We take the ornaments down 
with care — some of them belonged to 
my family before I was born and we 
pack them gently and carefully. Next 
comes the creche — the little figures of 
the Christmas scene. I began collect- 
ing mine twelve years ago, starting 
with Mary, Joseph and the Christ 
Child. Now I have some 20-odd fig- 
ures and even tiny earthenware pots 
from Ecuador. I wrap these with 
gentle care, too. Do you say a prayer 
when you take your tree down 1 Here 
is one : ' ' Heavenly Father, who made 
the trees to grow, Ave thank Thee for 
our tree. It smelled so sweet and 
looked so gay. Now take it away. 
Amen. ' ' 

This one is for the Manger figures : 
' ' Dear Father in heaven, we lay away 
the manger scene. We have seen it in 
the candlelight and it reminded us of 
the first Christmas. May we have 
Christmas in our hearts throughout 
the year. Amen. 

It makes me happy to recall that 
the first Christmas tree in Richmond 
was in the home of a Lutheran min- 
ister who brought the tradition of 
the tree with his family when they 
came from Germany. I know your 
tree is down but I thought you might 
like these prayers to use next Christ- 
mas. 

It is good to have a whole year 
stretching ahead in which to grow, 
work, study and play. And if you do 
exciting things won't you write and 
tell me so that I can share your ac- 
tivities with others? 



OBSERVING YOUR CHILDREN. 

By Janette Stevenson Murray. 
(American Mother for 1947.) 

Issued by the National Kindergarten 
Association 

"We bought Jean a new coat yes- 
terday," said her mother. "Every 
little while today I've found her 
standing in front of me with that coat 
on!" 

"Of course," said the neighbor. 
"She wanted you to talk about the 
coat — to tell her how nice she looks 
in it," 

"Oh, I never thought of that," her 
mother replied. ' ' I kept telling her to 
take it off and to go away and play. 
That was a pity. I remember now, 
she seemed disappointed each time." 

Too often mothers are so absorbed 
in their own interests that they brush 
their children's affairs aside as of lit- 
tle consequence. I have one mother 
in mind, however, who has made it a 
practice to sit down quietly and ob- 
serve her children, even arranging for 
other boys and girls to come in regu- 
larly, so that she may have a group 
to study. Her children will have a 
great advantage over boys and girls 
whose early influences are like those 
of two lads who lived near me. 

David, the elder, was self-effacing, 
while John was always wanting to oc- 
cupy the center of the stage. Their 
parents emphasized these character- 
istics by talking about them before 
the boys. The mother for instance, 
would say, "John, you can tell the 
clerk what I want better than David 
can." 

Fortunately for David, when he 
entered kindergarten John was not 
old enough to go. The teacher soon 
observed that David was painfully shy 
and always giving in to others, so she 
began commending his work at the 
tables, asking him to choose the game, 
and expecting him to take his turn. 

One morning his mother visited the 
kindergarten. The children were 
dramatizing "The Three ears" She 
was surprised when David was asked 
to be the big father bear and more 
siirprised when she heard David's 
"big gruff voice." 

After the session the teacher ex- 
plained what David needed. The 
mother had her eyes opened to the 
fact that she had been accentuating 



the faults of both boys and that each 
should have been treated in exactly 
the opposite way from what the fam- 
ily custom had been. 

From that day the parents stopped 
speaking of David's shyness, invited 
company especially for him, encour- 
aged him to go alone to his friends' 
homes, drew him into conversation by 
making it easy for him to express him- 
self, and took it as a matter of course 
that he would stand up for his rights 
in the home and among the children 
of the neighborhood. 

With John, their problem was to di- 
vert him from himself and to interest 
him in other children, so that he 
would not interrupt and override 
them. It was true that John had su- 
perior ability, but his parents ceased 
to mention it. They were advised to 
buy him tools and to encourage him 
to make things. This gave a vent 
for his superabundance of energy and 
initiative and lessened his desire to 
"boss" everything and everybody. 

A mother has much to gain by visit- 
ing the kindergarten She can observe 
her child as he does his part and com- 
pare him with the others. Then, too, 
she can confer with the teacher, who 
is an impartial and trained observer 
and everready with suggestions as to 
the best method of dealing with each 
child. 



OUR CHRISTIAN ORIENTATION. 

(Continued from page 5.) 
maintained by Orphaned Missions 
funds. 

Kagawa's evangelistic campaign in 
Japan has resulted in 150,000 con- 
verts. He says, "The ideal we pur- 
sue is that of making Japan a State 
with which God can be pleased." 
Michio Kozaki, Moderator of the 
Church of Christ in Japan (which in- 
cludes 85 per cent of the Protestant 
Churches) says, "There cannot be any 
true democracy without Christianity, 
which is the very basis of democracy. 
Christianity is on the increase and the 
minds of the people are receptive." 
The people are now freed from the 
fear of the "nightmare of Empire." 
There are few suicides. The country 
is experiencing the blessing of the 
"catharsis of defeat." (Of 0. T.) 
The Church has gained by its record 
of "complete identification with the 
people in all their suffering." Since 
the war American Christians have 
sent two million Testaments to J apan, 
by which the Gospel enters the grass- 
roots of the country. General Mac- 
Arthur asked for 1,000 Christian 
workers to come to Japan but we have 



Jcmuary 6, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Eleven, 



not risen to the occasion. Of 1,340 
missionaries in Japan, 1,120 are Ro- 
man Catholic We are not improving 
our Protestant opportunity. 

The situation in China is very dif- 
ficult because of Communism. Dr. 
Judd says Christianity in communist 
areas must "go underground, return 
to the catacombs if necessary." For- 
ty missionaries were flown out of sta- 
tions in the path of the communist 
advance. Our missionary, Alice Reed, 
is appalled by the steady spread of in- 
creased communist activities. But in 
spite of everything, she says, "The 
hopeful conditions are real." Thou- 
sands of students in our six mission 
middle schools are being influenced. 
It is a tragedy when the vacuum in 
China resulting from decay of tra- 
ditional beliefs is being filled with 
communism instead of Christianity. 
However, there is determined evange- 
listic effort with a three-year Chris- 
tian forward movement. 

2. A new opportunity for Chris- 
tianity because of the growth of lit- 
eracy. Twenty-five thousand have 
learned to read through Dr. Lau- 
bach's efforts since 1920. But what 
shall they read? Dr. Laubach calls 
for a School of Christian Journalism 
to produce suitable material. If the 
present trend continues, we shall 
have 500,000,000 new readers in fifty 
years. 

3. New mutual encouragement 
through the recently organized World 
Council of Churches. Members of 
churches everywhere will have the 
consciousness of belonging to the to- 
tal Christian group in the world. 
President McKay of Princeton, said 
the World Council was the product of 
missions. 

4. The improved situation of or- 
phaned missions. The German mis- 
sions in Africa have been carrying on 
in a good way, thanks to support from 
the International Missionary Council. 
Interned missionaries have returned 
to their fields. 

5. Our heroic colleagues in South 
America are carrying on bravely. 
Protestant growth in Brazil has in- 
spired a Bible reading campaign 
among the Catholics. Cardinal Mota 
designated the last Sunday in Sep- 
tember as Bible Sunday. The hier- 
archy sees that one reason for the ex- 
pansion of Protestantism is the wide- 
spread reading of the Bible. The 
Roman Catholic Church strongly sup- 
ports totalitarian Argentina. There 
is evidence of Roman Catholic revival 
in Mexico and pressure for religious 
uniformity We rejoice in the work 



of our German Congregational 
churches in Brazil and Argentina in 
the face of difficulties of entry and 
work Latin America in general is 
wide open to the evangelical message. 
But it will take a tremendous amount 
of aggressive, spiritual effort to coun- 
teract the political campaign of the 
hierarchy. The only answer to Ca- 
tholicism is better Protestantism. 

6. The battle royal with commu- 
nism, Christianity's greatest rival re- 
ligion. The battle of ideologies goes 
on and while we seek a sympathetic 
understanding with the proletariat of 
Russia that are not the dictators and 
that would normally respond to Chris- 
tianity we are only foolish to suppose 
that those in power will not use every 
opportunity to hamper and crush the 
religion that is wholly oposed to their 
own religion of materialism, force and 
absolutist control. 

7. Perhaps an even more deadly 
and subtle enemy of Christianity is 
secularism, which the Catholic Church 
considers the source of communism 
and other evils. We face an "in- 
creasingly secular world." Ignoring 
God and panning life on the basis of 
the every day world has consequences 
that are serious but not alertly real- 
ized. This means the deification of 
man. 

Secularism has a social suicidal 
tendency. There is admitted growth 
of secular emphasis on the material 
and finite, mechanization, delight in 
control over the physical world, in- 
dulgence of every sort. We hear the 
warning voices from every quarter. 
D. R. Davies in his book, The Sin of 
Our Age., sees three terrible conse- 
quences of this deification of man, (1) 
the abolition of other worldliness, that 
is the imprisonment of man in mere 
space and time, (2) the dissolution of 
spirit and the domination of matter, 
(31 the degradation of the individual 
into mass-man. Secularism calls for 
preventive missionary work, prevent- 
ing our own land from becoming 
pagan. There is the encouraging 
fact that first class authors are writ- 
ing about religion, compared to their 
ridicule of it in the 1920 's. And the 
circulation of church papers has in- 
creased 65 per cent since 1940. And 
church membership is now at an all- 
time high of 53 per cent, compared to 
22 per cent in 1890. In Iowa 78 per 
cent of the adults are church mem- 
bers, five out of ten attending prac- 
tically every Sunday. In 1946 $32,- 
829,804 was spent on overseas mis- 
sion work by 100 Protestant boards. 
We rejoice in this, but we deplore the 



fact that our giving to church and re- 
lated benevolences in 1933-45 de- 
creased over a billion dollars, com- 
pared to the 13-year previous period, 
or 19 per cent, and this when our na- 
tional income increased 136 per cent. 
With a windfall of $4,800,000,000 
through tax reduction this year, a 
man with a $4,000 net income will 
have $124 as his share. We repeat 
the plea of Toynbee to ' ' put the secu- 
lar superstructure back onto religious 
foundations. " 

8. A renewed battle on the tem- 
perance front. The Anti - Saloon 
League has become the Temperance 
League of America The Methodists 
are campaigning for 8,000,000 total 
abstainers Every member of t h e 
Southern Baptist Sunda y Schools 
over ten years of age was to be given 
an opportunity on May 30 to sign an 
abstinence pledge. Rev. Louis H. 
Evans of the Hollywood Presbyterian 
Church is President of the California 
Temeperance Federation. He says 
that the alcohol problem is so acute in 
Hollywood that his church with five 
pastors is able to help only one- 
tenth of those seeking aid. Interest- 
ingly, prohibition was predicted for 
Madras by October. And Pakistan is 
moving toward prohibition. One- 
sixth of India Avill go dry this year — 
Dnyanodaya. 

9. More stewardship emphasis, 
from necessity and for spiritual rea- 
sons. With our own rank of 19th 
among 21 denominations in denomi- 
natioanl benevolences and 17th in to- 
tal benevolences,, we can rightly ex- 
pect more attention to this vital mat- 
ter. 

10 The increasing call for the Bi- 
ble. In South America the demand is 
so great that double and treble the 
amount could be sold if obtainable. 
In Germany the number wanted is 
larger than it is possible to supply 
during the next years with an im- 
mediate need for 8,000.000 copies. 

11. A new generation of world- 
minded young peope. Pastors have 
no trouble interesting them in mis- 
sions. 



GIFTS FOR C.W.V.R, 
(Continued from page 3.1 
Treasurer, 1253 24th Street, Newport 
News, Va.. 

Treasurers of Women 's Societies of 
the Valley of Virginia Conference 
should send their "Thank Offering" 
contributions to : Mrs. Noah F. Paint- 
er, Treasurer, Route 3, Luray, Va. 

Frederick B. Etttsler, 
Chairman. 



Page Twelve. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 6, 1949. 



Sunday School Lesson 

By Rev. H. S. Hardcastlb, D. D. 



SOURCES OF OUR KNOWLEDGE 
OF JESUS. 

Lesson II — January 9, 1949. 

Memory Selection : These are writ- 
ten that ye may believe that Jesus 
is the Christ, the Son of God, and 
that believing you may have life in 
his name. — John 20 :31. 

Lesson : Mark 2 :13-14 ; Luke 1 :l-4 ; 
John 20 :30-31 ; 21 :25 ; Acts 1 :1, 20, 
35 ; I Cor. 11 :23-25 ; 15 :3-8 ; Colos- 
sians 4 :14 ; I John 1 :l-4. 

Devotional Reading : Hebrews 2 :l-9. 

One of the striking things about the 
life of Jesus Christ is the very meager 
information Avhich we have about 
Him. Most of the source material 
about Him is to be found in the New 
Testament, and as we shall see, this is 
not at all complete. But there is 
enough material to reconstruct a pic- 
ture of our Lord from the cradle to 
the Cross and beyond And more im- 
portant than the amount of this ma- 
terial, is its trustworthiness. Never 
were documents subjected to such 
critical study and such careful ex- 
amination and never did documents 
emerge, from these processes with 
stronger claims to credence. When 
we read the life of our Lord we do not 
follow "cunningly devised fables," 
but solid, historical facts. 
Sources of Our Knowledge of Jesus 
Outside the Scriptures. 

Strangely enough, there are only a 
few references to Jesus in secular his- 
tory from His day. Tacitus in his 
Annals refers to him briefly thus : 
"The founder of this sect was one 
Christus who was put to death in the 
reign of Tiberius by the procurator 
Pontius Pilate." He goes on to say 
that this act checked for a time "this 
pernicious superstition" but that it 
broke out again not only in Judea, but 
also "in the capital, to which place, 
everything that is hateful and shame- 
ful flows from every quarter and 
there meets with sympathy. ' ' 

Josephus in his Antiquities also 
makes several references to Jesus. 
The Talmud, a collection of rabinnical 
techings and laws, refers to Him. 
Other references to Him are to be 
found in "The Teaching of the 
Twelve Apostles," in Justyn Mar- 
tyr's works, in the writings of Origen 
and Clement, and in papyrus found 



in Egypt. These isolated and indi- 
vidual references are about all that 
we find about Jesus outside the Bible 
itself. 

Sources of Our Knowledge of J esus 
In the Bible. 

The first source materials about 
Jesus came from the letters of Paul. 
It may come as a surprise to many 
people to know that several, in fact a 
number, of Paul's letters were written 
before the gospels were written. And, 
of course, there are many references 
to Jesus in Paul's letters, but even at 
that they give but little information 
about the life of Jesus itself. And, of 
course, the letters of the other writers 
in the New Testament have many ref- 
erences to Jesus. The same thing is 
true of the Acts of the Apostles. 

But the greatest portion of our 
knowledge of Jesus comes from the 
Gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke, known 
as the ' ' Synoptic Gospels ' ' and the 
Gospel of John. And when one dis- 
covers that these gospels deal, with 
but few exceptions with His public 
ministry which lasted only about a 
year and a half or two years, and that 
in two of these Gospels from a quar- 
ter to a third of the story, is concerned 
with the last week of Jesus' life, one 
sees just how comparatively little 
source material we do have. For 
thirty of his thirty-two or three years 
of life, we have only a few references, 
the Infancy and Early Childhood 
stories, and from the time He was a 
a boy in Nazareth until He began His 
public ministry, almost thirty years, 
only one reference. These are facts 
well attested by scholars and by the 
Bible itself. 

Back of the Gospels are the oral 
traditions, or the spoken word. The 
disciples and the followers of Jesus 
told the stories of what He did, and 
they repeated what He said. They 
used this material for teaching and 
preaching purposes, and it was re- 
peated and remembered and became 
well fixed as to content and form. 
Then there came the time when some 
of this material was reduced to writ- 
ing to make it permanent There was 
one collection now called the "Q" 
document of such material, which 
formed the background for the fuller 
gospel stories. 

Mark undoubtedly wrote the first 



gospel. It is composed for the most 
part of what Jesus did, rather than 
what He said. It depicts Jesus as the 
Son of God, a man of mighty works 
and forthwith action. It forms the 
outline of the other gospels. 

Matthew's gospel came next. He 
used Mark's gospel as an outline but 
he had a great deal of material which 
Mark did not have or did not use espe- 
cially many of the sayings of Jesus. 
The theme of Matthew's gospel is 
"That the scripture might be ful- 
filled. ' ' He wrote showing J esus as the 
Messiah, as the King, and he wrote for 
the Jews as Mark wrote for the Rom- 
ans. 

Luke, a careful historian, wrote the 
next gospel Luke was a Gentile, a 
Greek physician, and a man of culture 
and keen mind. He sets forth Jesus 
as the Perfect Man. Luke 's gospel is 
the gospel of the common man, of the 
poor, of prayer. It is in the thinking 
of many people the most beautiful 
book ever written It was written for 
the Gentile world as well as the Jews. 

John's gospel is the "most spiritual 
gospel" in the right sense of that 
word. He does not give us a detailed 
account of the life of J esus, but rather 
takes certain incidents from the life 
of our Lord and draws a spiritual les- 
son from them. He wrote that men 
might believe that Jesus was the 
Christ, the Son of God, and that be- 
lieving they might have life through 
His name. 

The gospels have different view- 
points. They differ in many places in 
details. But their central theme is 
Jesus Christ and Him crucified. And 
as has been said, they are trustworthy 
records, fully accredited by the ex- 
acting tests to which the people of 
their day and the centuries have given 
them. In them are the words of 
eternal life through Jesus Christ. 



THE BOYHOOD AND YOUTH OF 
JESUS. 

Lesson III — January 16, 1948. 

Memory Selection : The child grew 
and became strong, filled with wis- 
dom; and the favor of God was 
upon him. — Luke 2 :40. 

Lesson: Matthews 2:13-15, 19-23; 
Mark 6 :3 ; Luke 2 :39-52. 

Devotional Reading : Luke 2 .-25-32. 
The Hidden Years. 
Reference was made in N&tes a few 

weeks ago to the tragically little — so 

it seems- — that we know about the life 

of Jesus before His public ministry. 

In fact we do not have a great deal of 
(Continued on page 15.) 



January 6, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Thirteen. 




THE NEED AND THE PROMISE. 

A Sermon 
By Albert Buckner Coe. 

Where is the God of judgment? 
— Malachi 2 :17. 

Thou shalt bring forth a son, 
and shalt call his name J esivs. He 
shall be great and shall be called 
the son of the Highest. — Luke 1 : 
31-32. 

Four hundred years before the 
birth of Christ a prophet lived named 
Malachi. He taught the people of 
Jerusalem. He was deeply concerned 
over their sins. They were unbroth- 
erly — ' ' Why do ye deal treacherously 
every man against his brother ? ' ' They 
were forgetful of God — "Judah hath 
profaned the holiness of the Lord." 
In this consciousness of the people's 
forgetfulness of God, Malachi yearned 
for assistance. In his anguish he 
cried aloud : ' ' Where is the God of 
judgment?" In figure the prophet 
lifts his voice out over the turbulent 
years between the Old and New Test- 
aments and with his eyes upon the 
future calls: "Where is the God of 
judgment?" The cry is answered. 
Back across the distance that sepa- 
rates the Old and the New Testament, 
back from the gospel of Luke, the re- 
ply comes clear and strong: "Thou 
shalt bring forth a son and shalt call 
his name Jesus. He shall be great 
and shall be called the son of the 
Highest." Jesus Christ is the prom- 
ise which answers the need. 

Behold the need in the broken char- 
acters of European youth ! Behold 
the promise in Christ through the 
Christians of America. 

Where do we hear the urgent cries 
of need today? They make a con- 
glomerate sound as we delve into our 
own lives, as we walk the streets of 
the city, as we hear voices of despair 
and hunger coming across the ocean, 
as we hear men and women and chil- 
dren crying for mercy out of the de- 
bris of bombed cities, as we watch cul- 
tured families in displaced persons 
camps caught like rats in a trap, all 
crying, "Where is the God of judg- 
ment ? ' ' 



Our world is in need. The war has 
been over for three years and still 
whole continents are physically and 
spiritually hungry. The countries of 
Europe are still heavily rationed. 
England is not starving, but is still 
short of some essentials of food, such 
as eggs and butter, not to speak of the 
general need of fats and sugars. Her 
people are discouraged and "hope" 
is a well nigh forgotten term. France 
is short of food and particularly those 
necessities for making food rich, such 
as fertilizer and farm implements. 
More than that, French character has 
deteriorated. There is no mutual con- 
fidence among people. They do not 
trust each other. They do not trust 
their government, which explains in 
part why their governments come and 
go in quick succession. All of this be- 
cause France has largely lost her re- 
ligion and her morals. Of the forty 
million people in France, only seven 
million are professing Christians — 
the remainder are fit subjects for 
atheism. Czechoslovakia is hungry. 
Most of her people are not commu- 
nists, though they struggle under a 
government that is Communist. The 
people walk the streets in fear and 
wonder when the way will turn and 
they will be returned to normal dem- 
ocratic living. Poland is still buried 
under the debris of bombed cities and 
her people till the soil as best they 
can with few farm implements. There 
are homes for old people and orphan- 
ages for children, but the masses of 
people see through a glass darkly and 
wonder what next. Germany is still 
bombed. Her people are for the most 
part undernourished. They are short 
of fats and sugar. Disease breaks out 
largely because of inadequate rations. 
And to make matters worse, there are 
settled on her soil today millions of 
displaced persons who wait for a day 
of liberation either to go to a foreign 
country or return to their own after 
the threat of Russia has passed. Yes, 
from these countries and from all 
countries of the world, the cry goes 
up: "Where is the God of judg- 
ment ? ' ' 

The Promise of Hope. 

To all of this need the promise 
comes back — ■ a promise of hope — 
"Thou shalt bring forth a son and 
shalt call his name Jesus. He shall 
be great and shall be called the son 
of the Highest." We rejoice with 
exceeding joy. Jesus Christ, center 
of the world's most beautiful story, 
born in a manger, watched over by 
the shepherds, adored by the wise 
men, "an infant tender and mild," is 



the promise for Malachi and the 
promise for us. 

Jesus, there is no dearer name than Thine 
While Time has blazoned on his mighty 
scroll ; 

Nor wreaths nor garlands ever did entwine 
So fair a temple of so vast a soul. 

What is there in Christ that can 
meet our needs? He was a man of 
compassion. He loved all men, even 
those who opposed him. Little chil- 
dren were dear to him. Sorrowing 
parents were comforted by him. The 
deaf, the dumb, the halt, the blind 
found a response in him. The weak 
eagerly sought him though sometimes 
they were pushed aside by the throng. 
A blind man, named Bartimaeus, was 
one of those left by the roadside. He 
waited, knowing that Jesus would 
pass. The surging crowd came on. 
Bartimaeus cried out in the midst of 
the din : ' 1 Jesus thou son of David, 
have mercy on me." It was such a 
piercing cry that Jesus heard him. 
He answered, "What wilt thou that 
I should do unto thee?" "That I 
might receive my sight." Quickly 
came Jesus' response of mercy and 
love: "Go thy way, thy faith hath 
made thee whole." r What compas- 
sion ! And that compassion working 
through us can bless our world today. 
Christ, the compassionate one knows 
our sorrows, is acquainted with our 
grief and seeks to make us whole. 

With what consecration he lived — 
and died! It would have been far 
easier for him to lead a sheltered life. 
He could have passed his time in rest 
and quietness in Bethany. But he 
would not. He was God's son. He 
had a mission. He was under com- 
pulsion to reveal God to men. The 
consecration can permeate our dis- 
traught world. 

' ' Wonderful,, Counselor. ' ' 

Jesus, the Savior, is ours to receive. 
However we may conceive of radi- 
ance, he is more radiant. However 
we may comprehend love, he is great- 
er love. However, we may know de- 
votion, he exceeds it. Wonderful, 
Counselor, Mighty God, Prince of 
Peace. We must receive him into our 
lives at Christmas. 

Having received him into our lives 
at Christmas, we must be his instru- 
ments of compassion and courage and 
devotion. The world's hungry peo- 
ple both physically and spiritually 
cry to us across the broad oceans. In 
the name of our Christ we must cup 
our hands and call back to them our 
promise of aid 

We have a means whereby we may 
send our help. Our Congregational 
(Continued on page 14.) 



Page Fourteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN 



SUN 



January 6, 1949. 



EiaMaMajsMS^'aiaiaiaMSJSMaiaiaMSjaiaMaja 

J The Orphanage 1 

i Chas. D. Johnston, Supt. 1 

Dear Friends: 

We are holding- our books for one 
more report which will close the Or- 
phanage business for the year, 1948. 
We are quite a distance from our 
goal and will have to receive checks 
in an abundance to get enough to 
reach it by January 6, the day our 
final report for the year, 1948, will 
be made. So far, from the churches 
and .Sunday schools we have receive 
the sum of $20,920.17. From special 
offerings we have received the sum 
of $22,393.73, making a grand total 
of $43,313.90. We still lack $6,686.10 
of being to our goal. In our next 
letter we will give you full details for 
the year, 1948. 

The Orphanage children had a very 
happy Christmas All were happy. 
The student body at Elon College 
played "Santa" to all of them, and 
all the children were given nice pres- 
ents and were happy. I think the 
student body got a real joy out of the 
occasion. 

The Burlington Church invited all 
the children down to the Burlington 
Church and put on a Christmas pro- 
gram for them, which they thorough- 
ly enjoyed. 

Chas. D. Johnston, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT FOR DECEMBER 30, 1948. 
Sunday School Monthly Offerings. 

Amount brought forward $17,531.68 

Eastern N. C. Conference: 

Lebanon $10.00 

New Elam S. S 13.69 

Pleasant Union 25.00 

Southern Pines S. S 23.86 

Wake Chapel S. S 40.01 

112.56 

Eastern Va. Conference: 
Bethlehem (Nans.) S. S. .$13.40 

Dendron S. S 13.00 

Liberty- Spring S. S 7.00 

Newport News S. S 13.00 

Norfolk, First 25.00 

Oakland S. S 25.50 

Spring Hill 9.00 

105.90 

N. C. & Va. Conference : 

Asheville $ 5.00 

Bethlehem . 50.00 

Burlington 5.00 

Durham S. S 27.38 

Happy Home 8.92 

Montieello 30.32 

Mt. Bethel 3.00 

New Lebanon S. S 22.00 

Pleasant Grove S. S 26.86 

178.58 

Western N. C. Conference: 

Ether S. S $ 8.24 

Flint Hill (M) 3.17 

Shiloh S. S 21.71 

33.12 



Va. Valley Conference: 

Leaksville S. S $ 5.41 

Newport 12.96 

— 18.37 

Ala. Conference: 
Corinth 5.00 

Ga. Conference : 
Central S. S 7.50 

Total this week from 

Regular Offerings $ 461.03 

Thanksgiving Offerings. 

Eastern N. C. Conference: 

Henderson $121.00 

Oak Level 25.00 

Sanford 100.00 

$ 246.00 

N. C. & Va. Conference : 

Burlington S. S $2,207.37 

Durham 163.35 

Elon College 207.00 

Haw River 54.19 

Pleasant Grove S. S 14.00 

2,645.91 

Western N. C. Conference : 
Smithwood 35.55 



Total this week from 

Thanksgiving Offerings $ 2,927.46 



Total for week from churches $ 3,388.49 

Total for year from churches $20,920.17 
Special Offerings. 

Amount brought forward $21,509.20 

Mr. Haith, children $ 7.00 

Mrs. Sullo, children 26.12 

Mrs. Burgess, children . . . 23.00 
Mr. Rurnley, Jerry Wil- 

kins 10.00 

Mr. Whitaker, Tommy 

Wilkins 10.00 

Neese-Baracca Class, Reids- 

ville, for J. C. Davidson 30.00 
Huber Bible Class, South 

Norfolk, for Jackie 

Wilkins 25.00 

Cash, hauling seats 10.00 

Burlington Rotary Club . . 238.75 

Big Oak S. S 3.34 

383.21 

Thanksgiving & Christmas Offering. 

Mr. O. S. Clayton $100.00 

Miss Lura Kennedy 40.00 

Neese-Baracca Class, 

Reidsville 50.00 

Mr. A. W. Cooper & 

Friends .' 2.00 

Mr. C. V. Hooper 10.00 

Mr. Samuel Earman 50.00 

Mr. Allen D. Moore 50.00 

Gibsonville Development Co. 15.00 
Mr. & Mrs. Earnest Sibley 5.00 
Mrs. Inez Darden Harrell 5.00 

Mr. Garland Gray 100.00 

The C. B. Dolge Co 9.32 

Burlington Rotary Club . 10.00 

A Friend 5.00 

Gate City Motor Co 25.00 

Huffman Oil Company . . . 25.00 

501.32 



Total this week from Special 

Thanksgiving Offerings . . $ 884.53 



Total this year from Special 

& Thanksgiving Offerings $22,393.73 



LETTER FROM THE JACKSONS. 

( Continued from page 8. ) 
tion. We shall thus be enabled to 
face the uncertain future without fear 
and frustration, knowing that the 
future is in His hands. 

By the time this letter reaches you, 
Christmas will probably have passed. 
We hope it has been a meaningful one 
for you. We earnestly desire for each 
of you that 1949 may be a year filled 
with happiness and spiritual blessing. 
In our moments of decision and in 



your prayers. 



Cordially, 
Dick, Dorothy & 
Lewis Jackson. 



THE NEED AND THE PROMISE. 

(Continued from page 13.) 
Christian Committee for War Victims 
and Reconstruction started out three 
years ago to raise $4,300,000. This 
was not too large a sum when we com- 
pare it with the sum of $27,000,000 
sought by the Presbyterians To date 
we have raised three and a half mil- 
lion dollars of the amount we sought. 
Now with our Committee completing 
its work on January 1, 1949 and going 
out of existence as far as its leader- 
ship is concerned, we request from 
the church of our denomination $800,- 
000 to complete our task. In the name 
of the lonely, hungry despairing peo- 
ple we appeal to our members to help 
us complete this task. In the name of 
Christ, who never failed to touch the 
eyes of the blind and lift up those who 
were fallen, we appeal to our Chris- 
tian friends to help us meet the over- 
powering demands upon us for help. 



Nothing will ever take the place of 
simple, unobtrusive, old-fashioned 
courtesy. — Matthew S. Sloan. 




The- 



Grand total for the week ... $ 4,273.02 



Grand total for the year . . . $43,313.90 




PILGRIM PRESS 

124 West Fourth Street Dayton 2, Ohio 

Center all orders for your 
church and church school 
needs through your author- 
ized denominational supply 
and publishing house. 

Bibles — Books — Hymnals 
Pilgrim Series of Lessons 
Closely Graded Courses 
Uniform Lessons 

Communion Ware 
Offering Plates 



Send for latest catalog 



January 6, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Fifteen. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON. 
(Continued from page 12.) 
information about His public min- 
istry. When one reads the lesson ma- 
terial for today he realizes how ap- 
propriately the first thirty years of 
Jesus' life can be called "the hidden 
years." There is, of course, the sur- 
passingly beautiful story of His birth 
as told by Luke the beloved physician, 
and a brief account of the first few 
days of His infancy. There is also 
a very brief reference to His birth 
in connection with the visit of the 
Wise Men and the flight into Egypt as 
told by Matthew. But from the time 
of his earliest infancy until He was 
twelve years old, there is a break in 
the record, absolute silence in regard 
to the days of his boyhood. Then after 
Luke's illuminating story in connec- 
tion with His trip to Jerusalem at the 
age of twelve — the age at which every 
Jewish boy became a "son of the law" 
until He was thirty years of age or 
thereabout, there is another break in 
the record, absolute silence in regard 
to the years of young manhood and 
young adulthood. It seems unfortu- 
nate, almost tragic, that we have such 
a limited or fragmentary record of 
this, the greatest life that was ever 
lived. 

Much in Little. 
We have but little, but that little 
tells us much. If one reads the rec- 
ords closely he will learn much about 
these ' ' hidden years. ' ' The few bold 
strokes that the writer-artists do 
draw, tell us much. The picture can 
readily be filled in without drawing 
on the unrestrained imagination. 
There is much that we would like to 
know but there is little more than we 
need know. The infancy and child- 
hood and youth of Jesus were all a 
revelation of the divine plan for the 
children of men. 

Providentially Preserved. 
Matthew plainly states that the in- 
fant Jesus was providentially pre- 
served by God. Here was the child of 
promise, the fulfilment of prophecy, 
the promised Messiah, the Son of God, 
the Agent of divine purpose, the Sav- 
iour of the world. And God saw to it 
that His unique Son was protected 
and preserved until He had fulfilled 
His purpose. Thus in His infancy 
and childhood He was preserved 
against the murderous intent of the 
monster Herod, and again and again 
during His ministry He was kept un- 
til in fulfilment of the divine promise 
and purpose He gave Himself on the 
Cross for our sins. Here is drawn out 
out in living letters the story of the 



mysterious ways in which God per- 
forms His wonders. 

Religiously Nurtured. 
Even a casual reading of the story 
of the early years of the Master's life 
reveal the fact that He was cradled 
and nurtured in a religious home. 
Here was a virgin, chaste in spirit and 
reverent in attitude and obedient to 
the divine vision, who through those 
hidden years wielded a wholesome and 
determinative influence over His life. 
And the record indicates plainly that 
Joseph, His foster father was a man of 
reverent spirit and religious faith, as 
well as of sensitive spirit. His par- 
ents were regular attendants at the 
feasts, and were faithful in the per- 
formance of their religious duties. 
There was religious instruction in the 
home and better still a religious at- 
mosphere in the home. And when in 
later years the call of God came, Jesus 
could interpret it in terms of the sane 
and simple and sound life of the home. 

Growing Symmetrically. 
The Son of God lived and grew as 
the son of men. He was in this re- 
spect like unto all the sons of men. He 
grew in bodily strength and skill and 
resiliency into a man of rugged, ro- 
bust health and bodily vigor and 
strength. He played as a boy, and 
worked as a young man, undoubtedly 
as a carpenter. He had tasks to do 
in and around the home and learned 
the discipline of work and self-denial 
and cooperation. He also grew in 
wisdom. His mother taught him out 
of the great wealth of the treasury of 
the religious history of His people. 
He undoubtedly attended the syna- 
gogue school and He had to learn as 
did any other boy. He had to learn 
to observe, to think, to reason, to 
speak — it was not a gift poured ready- 
made into His mind. He grew, too, 
said Luke in favor with God and with 
man. We may be sure that he prac- 
ticed the social graces which are the 
marks of a true gentleman. One can 
be sure that He was no prude, or 
stuffed shirt or high hat. One sus- 
pects that He was one of the most 
popular boys in the village, and one 
of the best liked young men in the 
community, simple, sincere, sound, 
modest, polite and popular even if 
serious beyond many of his fellow- 
townsmen And Luke adds that He 
grew in favor also with God. It is a 
mistake to think that His knowledge 
of God and His discovery of the Fa- 
ther's will came to Him all of a sud- 
den. It is more in keeping with the 
facts to assume that the religious con- 
sciousness dawned gradually and de- 



veloped normally. But there was an 
eagerness to learn and a glad response 
to each new revelation cr discovery of 
God. He was always obedient to the 
heavenly vision. It is to be noted, too, 
that He was subject to His parents. 
He was no free lance, no passionate 
individualist going His own way re- 
gardless of the counsel of His parents 
and the rights of others. He learned 
obedience and practiced it. As a boy 
He played eagerly, fairly joyfully — 
we may be sure of that. As a young 
man He was a workman that needed 
not to be ashamed — we may be just 
as sure of that. The latter years of 
His public ministry were but the 
flowering and the fruitage of the hid- 
den years of his boyhood. Here was 
the ideal for boyhood and youth. 
Definitely Called. 
As stated above Luke breaks the 
silence of the thirty "hidden years" 
with the story of the boy Jesus' first 
visit to Jerusalem at the age of twelve. 
It is too familiar to need retelling. It 
has many interesting sidelights as well 
as highlights. There is the significant 
fact that the last place his parents 
looked for Him was in the Temple — 
it evidently did not Cccur to them that 
He would be found there. But per- 
haps the central fact is the evidence 
that at that early age, the boy Jesus 
had already felt the divine call, had 
felt the hand of God upon Him, had 
sensed a divine mission that had laid 
hold on Him and made it imperative 
that He should be about the Father's 
business. It is not likely that His 
sense of His Messiahship came sud- 
denly. It probably came gradually. 
But God's spirit had already spoken 
to the boy 'and there was a glad re- 
sponse in His heart. It is significant, 
too, that after the experience in the 
Temple, He returned with His par- 
ents to Nazareth, "and was subject 
unto them." Obedience to His par- 
ents was an integral part of His obed- 
ience to His heavenly Father. 

Patiently Working and Waiting. 

And then another long silence in 
the record — at least eighteen years 
more, before there is another word 
concerning Him. They were years of 
working, while waiting. It must have 
made heavy demands on His patience. 
But He bided the time until God's 
clock struck the hour, the meanwhile 
working, and thus doing the work of 
the Father even as later He did more 
spectacular works in the Father's 
name It was all of one piece. He 
could not have done the one if He had 
not done the other. Truly this man 
was the Son of God. 



Page Sixteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 6, 1949. 



LETTER FROM AFRICA 



Missao de Dondi 
C. P. 28 Bela Vista 
Angola, Africa 

Dear Friends: 

First of all I want to thank you people who 
have been so kind at responding to my request 
for pictures. I wish there were some way to 
tell you just what a help they are in the Bible 
classes. It is so impossible sometimes to try to 
explain things but when one can say, "Look, it 
is like this," what a wealth of information he 
has given. And how the students love to have 
a picture or two in their book to take home. 
Or even one for the cover is a treasure to them. 
Then in turn use them in their teaching. 

Four weeks ago today I arrived in Dondi 
with full intentions of getting a letter off the 
first week. But instead I spent it finding a new 
girl for the house, teaching her to do some of 
the work and doing most of it myself. My 
house mate, Amy Schauffler promised to be 
here to help set up the house but she got word 
her sister was to arrive so instead of finding 
Amy I found a note saying, "I'll be back in a 
week." I unpacked, scrubbed floors, made 
curtains, laid rugs, cleaned windows and made 
beds all hours of the day and night. In between 
I wrote lessons for a teachers conference. 

Three weeks ago today Amy came back 
bringing her sister, Dorothy, and another mis- 
sionary for a week's visit. The next Monday I 
started teaching in the teachers' conference, 
having four hours every morning and super- 
vising work periods in the afternoons. That 
kept me busy to say nothing of the company 
in the house and something special on every 
night. 

Two weeks ago we saw our guests off on the 
train and I was ready to settle down and write 
some lessons for the school year. But no such 
luck. One of the missionaries, Margaret Halli- 
day, has been ill for some weeks. The girl who 
was to help us, Muggy Dawson, went out there 
to take over the work and care for Margaret. 
What with some of our girls already here and 
the rest due on Wednesday, there was nothing 
to do but take care of every immediate job as it 
came along. Anyway the week flew with jobs 
of registering, feeding, distributing books, ex- 
aminations and acting as general handy man. 

The next thing I knew last Monday was 
here and classes were underway. I had man- 



aged to get some lessons ready for the other 
teachers in Bible but find taking over Muggy's 
Bible class with a five-minute warning a little 
difficult. However, we have gotten through 
the first week and I have my lessons at least a 
day ahead now instead of just one hour, so per- 
haps I shall get a good start this week. We are 
now well into the classes with 165 girls present. 
We are still holding our breath for fear small- 
pox breaks out. We thought the scare was over 
but heard yesterday that 25 of our girls were 
traveling together and one was taken sick and 
sent back. She now has smallpox. What about 
the others! Time will tell! 

I'm really having the time of my life this 
year. There is no doubt but that I'm busy, but 
being a person who likes work that suits me 
fine. I thought I'd be teaching the Life of 
Paul as I did last year and for which I had all 
kinds of material and lessons but when Muggy 
left I had to give my well-planned schemes to 
native teachers and take over her group for 
which I can't even find lessons in Umbundu 
most of the time. Their work is a series of 
short courses on worship, women's and girls' 
work in the villages, "How We Got Our Bible 
and Church History." Then I have a lesson 
once a week with them on "How to Teach in 
the Sunday School." Also have two other 
groups each of which are taking "Life of Christ 
and Worship." I also supervise the other Bi- 
ble Classes and have been doing my share of 
trying to help get the academic classes started. 
It is all great fun, especially when you don't 
know quite what it is all about. My out-of- 
school hours are even fuller than my in-school 
ones as I have the boarding — which includes 
feeding the girls and taking care of the dormi- 
tories. And I'm general handy man of extra 
curricular activities and gym. The time in the 
latter is filled trying to plan for Founder's Day 
on December 1. The other includes two nights 
of social room a week where the girls sew, 
crochet, read, knit, etc. There is also to be one 
girls' club a week and we hope to start a couple 
of ball teams and a dramatic club. These will 
be for after-school hours. 

Greetings to all from one who misses you 
and your intimate friendship but who wouldn't 
be any other place for the world ! 

HARRIET M. SUMMERVILLE 



Chri* 



1844 - Over a Century of Service to the fi'enomiriation - 1948 

The CHRISTIAN SUN 

ORGAN OF THE SOUTHERN CONVENTION OF CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 
In Essentials, Unity — In Non-Essentials, Liberty — In All Things, Charity 



Volume CI. 



RICHMOND, VA., THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1949. 



Number 2. 



Greatest Story Ever Told" 
Receives Another Honor 




John K. Hough, right, director of advertising for The Goodyear 
Tire & Rubber Company, accepting plaque from M. Simmons, pub- 
lisher of Magazine Digest, honoring Goodyear 's public service radio 
program, "The Greatest Story Ever Told," as the outstanding radio 
program in the religious category. 

The program, broadcast over the ABC network every Sunday at 
6:30 p. m., EST, is a drama based on the teachings of Christ, and 
carries no commercial announcement. "The Greatest Story Ever Told," 
now in its third season on the air, has received more honors, awards, 
and commendation than probably any other radio program. 



Page Two. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 13, 1949. 



I News Flashes | 

We learn with regret of the passing 
of Brother V. 0. Kitchens of Roanoke, 
Alabama, who died on Tuesday, De- 
cember 28. Burial was at Antioch 
Church on the following Thursday. 



We received New Year's greetings 
last week from Rev. G. D. Hunt, our 
veteran minister of Wadley, Alabama. 
We return his greetings and wish 
for him a very, very Happy New Year. 



Rev. H. A. Ironside, a Bible scholar- 
author and preacher of fifty years ex- 
perience, is holding services at the 
First Church, Portsmouth, Va., dur- 
ing this week, at 3 :30 and 7 :30 p. m. 
The final service will be held on Sun- 
day evening, January 16. 



Busy ministers and teachers may 
find help in preparing their sermons 
and lessons for Race Relations Sun- 
day, February 13, 1949, in materials 
available from the North Carolina 
Commission on Interracial Coopera- 
tion, Box 1208, Raleigh, N. C. It will 
be sent free upon request. 



BURLINGTON FOUNDATION GIVES 
$8,500 FOR ELON COLLEGE 
GYMNASIUM. 

Contribution of the sum of $8,500 
toward the construction of a new gym- 
nasium for Elon College has been an- 
nounced jointly by Dr. L. E. t Smith, 
President of the College, and the trus- 
tees of the Burlington Foundation, 
donors of the gift. 

Granted by the Burlington Foun- 
dation, a trust established by Burling- 
ton Mills Corporation for educational, 
charitable and other purposes, the gift 
to the college was presented to Dr. 
Smith by Hinton Rountree, Elon 
alumnus, who is now associated with 
the cost control department of Bur- 
lington Mills. 

In accepting the gift, Dr. Smith 
expressed his appreciation for the 
"generous consideration in our efforts 
to provide facilities for physical edu- 
cation on our campus at Elon Col- 
lege." Noting that the school has been 
in need of a new gymnasium for some- 
time, he stated that "I want you to 
know that the board of trustees, fa- 
culty and students are all appreci- 
ative of this generous assistance. ' ' 

The trustees of the Burlington 
Foundation, commenting upon their 
(Continued on page 7.) 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SEC- 
RETARY APPOINTED. 

Fiction best sellers and modern art 
exhibits seem to indicate that the ar- 
tists and authors see no meaning in 
life, says Herman F. Reissig of New 
York City who has just been appoint- 
ed International Relations Secretary 
of the Congregational Christian Coun- 
cil for Social Action. "It is not the 
artists who have lost all sense of di- 
rection, however," Mr. Reissig be- 
lieves, adding, "they are merely the 
sensitive barometers, as they ought to 
be, of the mood of their times. ' ' 

Reading fiction best sellers and at- 
tending modern art exhibits is, there- 
fore, a good way to estimate the job 
ahead of the Christian Church in our 




REV. HERMAN F. REISSIG. 

time, according to Mr. Reissig. He 
believes also that one reason our in- 
ternational situation is so serious is 
because ' ' Marxists do not believe man 
is a sinner and we in the so-called 
Christian countries have forgotten it. 
This means there is no humility, only 
pride and self -righteousness on both 
sides." The Christian teaching con- 
cerning repentance, forgiveness and 
love may not be easy to translate into 
terms of concrete international prob- 
lems, says Mr. Reissig, but we will not 
have a much saner world until we re- 
learn these things for ourselves and 
apply them to our social problems. 

In this new work as International 
Relations Secretary, Mr. Reissig, 
whose home is at 56 West 36th St., 
New York City, will conduct a pro- 
gram of education and action on in- 
ternational relations, the United Na- 
tions and American Policy, for the 
Congregational Christian Chlrches of 
the U. S. A. 

Born in a United Lutheran Manse, 



the son of a minister Mr. Reissig is a 
graduate of Wagner Memorial Luth- 
eran College and Mt. Airy .Seminary. 
Ordained into the Lutheran ministry, 
he transferred to the Congregational 
ministry in 1925. His pastorates have 
included the West End Congrega- 
tional Church, Bridgeport, Conn. 
(1925-30) ; King's Highway Congre- 
gational Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
(1931-36) ; and the First Congrega- 
tional Church of Quincy, 111. (1942- 
47 ) . From 1947 until the present he 
served as Field Secretary of the 
American Committee for the World 
Council of Churches. Between 1936 
and 1941 Mr. Reissig made five trips 
to Europe as exchange preacher and 
relief director. 



TO THE EDITOR. 

The December 16, 1948, issue of 
The Christian Sun has just come 
and, as usual, I enjoyed reading 
through it. 

Two items attracted my special at- 
tention and I want to thank you for 
them. The first was the report by 
Rev. Kenneth Register concerning the 
organization of Men's Club at his 
church in Union (N. C). I was par- 
ticularly impressed by the closing 
paragraph and sentence of his report. 
He said that the men really mean 
business and I can truthfully say that 
men all over America are feeling the 
very same way. 

The second item was your editorial 
on the "Federal Council, 1908-1948." 
I read that with interest, particularly 
the comment on Mr. Taft's address to' 
the meeting. Having traveled in 
Europe this summer and seeing the 
state of the church in twelve countries, 
it is easy to become concerned that 
the same lifelessness, at least in the 
state churches, shall never come to 
our churches here. I am convinced 
also that a wide-awake laity, practic- 
ing every day the principles of Chris- 
tianity and seeing to it that their 
churches are effective and efficient, 
can be a big help all over America. 

Please express my warmest greet- 
ings to all your staff, your ministers 
and lay people and I hope that all of 
you will have enjoyed the Christmas 
season and that 1949 will be one of the 
best years you have known. 

Walter A. Graham, Director, 
National Laymen's Fellowship. 



The Gospel Advocate enters the new 
year in new dress. We congratulate 
the management on the larger paper 
and its improved appearance. 



January 13, 1949. 

MASSACHUSETTS MAN COMMIS- 
SIONED FOR NATIONAL POST. 

Rev. R. Norris Wilson has been ap- 
pointed to the post of Associate Min- 
ister and Associate Executive Secre- 
tary of the Missions Council. He was 
commissioned on Monday evening, De- 
cember 27, in the First Congregation- 
al Church of Wakefield, Mass., by six 
national and international heads of 
the denomination. 

The sermon was preached by Dr. 
Douglas Horton on the subject, 
"Weather Forecast for Christen- 
dom." 

Mr. Wilson began his new work on 
January 1 with headquarters at 287 
Fourth Avenue, New York City, and 
will make his home, with his wife and 
two children, in General Wayne Vil- 
lage, Madison, New Jersey. He was 
born in Hinsdale, Illinois, and is a 
graduate of Olivet College and Chi- 
cago Theological Seminary with grad- 
uate work at Yale Divinity School. 
In 1936 Mr. Wilson was in Summer 
Student Service work in the states 
of Washington and Oregon, and in 
1937 he attended the historic Oxford 
and Edinburg Conferences in Great 
Britain. 

His pastorates in the Congregation- 
al Christian ministry have included 
Pulaski, N. Y. ; Sterling, 111.; Wake- 
field, Mass., where he has been since 
1945 pastor of the First Congrega- 
tional Church. He is a member of 
the Prudential Committee of the 
American Board of Foreign Missions 
and a Trustee of Olivet College and 
the American University at Beirut, 
Lebanon. 

In his new national job Mr. Wilson 
will share in certain administrative 
tasks but primarily he will be re- 
sponsible for assisting State Confer- 
ences in planning a comprehensive 
program of promotion integrating 
conference staff leaders, committees 
on promotion, and Pilgrim Fellow- 
ship leaders and Religious Education 
Directors into a unified promotional 
team. 

He will direct the activities of the 
National Committee on Missionary 
Education, Stewardship and Promo- 
tion. One of his immediate jobs will 
be to interpret in the pulpits, in con- 
ferences and in forums the Christian 
World Mission of the Congregational 
Christian Churches which has now 
under way the raising of a benevo- 
l lenee budget of $6,280,000. Mr. Wil- 
son will promote especially the item 
of Relief and Reconstruction in the 
unified budget of this Christian 
World Mission. 

"The clock has stood at 'five min- 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 

utes to twelve' so long that we are 
almost convinced that it has stopped 
there. Crisis is commonplace," says 
Mr. Wilson. "Perhaps in a way it 
has stopped. We are told that revela- 
tion is progressive and that God does 
not give us the next lesson until we 
have earned the last. Sympathy will 
not heal the world and generosity will 
not feed the hungry. It will not sat- 
isfy the kind of hunger with which 
the world is hungry now. What will 
heal the world and meet its hunger is 
a right and living answer to that most 




REV. R. NORRIS WILSON. 

searching of all questions, 'What 
think ye of Christ?' " 



The Eighteenth Ministers' Week 
will be held at the Chicago Theologi- 
cal Seminary, January 31 - February 
4. Lecturers include Bishop G. Brom- 
ley Oxnam, Dean Harold A. Bosley, 
Prof. Arnold 0. Wolfers and Dr. 
Harold C. Urey. Other features in- 
clude morning classes by faculty and 
afternoon workshops. For informa- 
tion write to 5757 University Avenue, 
Chicago 37, Illinois. 



Page Three. 

The Christian Sun 

Established 1844 by Rev. Daniel W. Kerr. 

A Religious Weekly for the Home, devoted 
to the interests of the Kingdom as represent- 
ed by the Congregational Christian Churches. 
Our Principles. 

1. The Lord Jesus Christ is the only 
Head of the Church. 

2. Christian is a sufficient name for the 
Church. 

3. The Bible is a sufficient rule of faith 
and practice. 

4. Christian character is a sufficient test 
of fellowship and Church membership. 

5. The right of private judgment and the 
liberty of conscience is a right and a privi- 
lege that should be accorded to and exer- 
cised by all. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor Kobert Lee House 

Managing Editor John T. Kernodle 

Associate Editors — J. B. Allen, H. Q. Coun- 
cil Jr., J. H. Dollar, F. B. Eutsler, S. C. 
Harrell, B. M. Kimball, B. V. Munger, 
J. E. Neese, W. W. Sloan, H. S. Smith. 
Corresponding Editors — J. F. Apple (E. N. 
C), W. M. Stevens (N. C. & Va.), F. C. 
Lester (W. N. C), J. G. Truitt (E. Va.), 
li. A. Whitten (V. Va.). 
Departmental Editors — Wm. T. Scott, Con- 
vention ; Mrs. W. J. Andes, Women's 
Work; Miss Elizabeth Chicoine, Young 
People's Work; Mrs. K. L. House, Chil- 
dren; L. E. Smith, Christian Education; 
Clias. D. Johnston, Orphanage; H. S. 
Hardcastle, Sunday School. 
Board of Publications — W. J. Andes, S. E. 
Madren, W. M. Stevens, W. E. Wisseman, 
T. F. Wright. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

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One Year $2.00 



Published by the Board of Publications, 
agent for the Southern Convention of Con- 
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every Thursday except the last in June and 
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Entered as second-class matter at the Post 
Office at Richmond, Va., July 25, 1922, un- 
der Act of March 3, 1879. 



Remittances for subscriptions should be sent 
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Page Four. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 13, 1949. 




'S J^jXSSAGE, 



APOLOGIA FOR BLUE PREACHER. 

Poor fellow! Our Blue Preacher, who voiced his 
doubts and anxieties in our December 23 issue, has been 
properly excoriated. Blue preachers usually suffer in 
silence. Occasionally they weep on one another's shoul- 
ders. This unusually blue preacher inadvertently blurted 
out his pent-up lamentations. Now he has been put very 
properly in his place, reprimanded for his temporary 
weakness, and buttressed with the theology of perfec- 
tionism. 

Wonder how he feels now ? Of course the answers 
given in this issue are true. But they apply primarily 
to that phase of the pastor's problem which might be 
summarized in the test: "And David encouraged him- 
self in the Lord." 

The stark facts mentioned by the dejected preacher 
— and others — remain. The disparity between profes- 
sion and practice, the ethical obtuseness of some who 
are prominent in church circles, the persistence of the 
status quo, the financial stringency under which most 
church work must be done, anti-progressive cliques, 
unenlightened and authoritative church leaders, laxity in 
church attendance, etc. 

No layman responded by saying: "We are to blame, 
preacher. No wonder you are discouraged. You preach 
a dynamic gospel while we persist in our lethargy. Many 
of us have become so habituated in our secular living 
that we are practically immune to the religion of Christ. 
Many of our atttitudes are formed and decisions are 
made as democrats or southerners rather than as Chris- 
tians. We have inadvertently — almost unconsciously as- 
sumed the attitude that Christianity is something to be 
preached, not lived. I am not surprised that you are 
discouraged and disillusioned. I am surprised that you 
have not given up long ago." Such a confession would 
bring cathartic tears to the preacher's eyes, warm his 
lonely heart, and send him back to the pulpit with a re- 
newing gospel. 

The preacher is a human being, not a god. He has 
this Treasure, but it is in an earthen vessel. Must he be 
banished to the ministerial dog house for indulging tem- 
porarily in a bit of mild self-pity? Blue Monday is an 
ancient institution in the ministerial fraternity and it is 
observed by ministers of all denominations. It will be 
news indeed if we succeed in abolishing it overnight. 



RELIGION AND ECONOMICS. 

To develop an informed and active concern within 
the churches for Christian principles in economic life, 
the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in Amer- 
ica, has designated the week beginning with the third 
Sunday of January as "Church and Economic Life 
Week." The first annual observance will be held Jan- 
uary 16-22, 1949. 




Announcement of the observance, approved by the 
Executive Committee, was made by the Rev. Cameron 
P. Hall, executive secretary of the Federal Council's De- 
partment of the Church and Economic Life. 

"Christians will match the demands of the times 
as they accept their responsibility before God for what 
each can do individually and together, in his economic 
activity and relations," said the Rev. Mr. Hall. 

"In urging the local church and the local com- 
munity to join in this observance, the Department of 
the Church and Economic Life recognized that vast 
numbers of church people are confused and hesitant 
about what is required of them as Christians in economic 
life. 

"Genuine progress toward economic justice has 
been made but in these confused and chaotic times 
there is much insecurity and fear. The consequences of 
failure to achieve constructive solutions of these prob- 
lems would be national and worldwide disaster. 

"Our nation's efforts to encourage European and 
world recovery are endangered by vast inflationary 
pressures at home. Any serious decline toward a depres- 
sion would lead to disillusion and desperation here and 
abroad. The solution of economic problems needs not 
only people of technical competence but also calls for 
people with conviction and understanding of what it 
means 'to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk 
humbly with thy God,' in economic life. 

" 'Church and Economic Life Week' will provide 
an opportunity for church people to grow into and 
build upon their responsibility before God for what they 
do in economic life — as people who buy what others 
make, or who produce what others buy; who make de- 
posits in banks and who draw income from investments ; 
who have the power to employ others or who depend 
for an income upon being employed by others." 



THOUGHT FOR TODAY. 

"Thus speaketh Christ, Our Lord." 
"Ye call Me Master and obey Me not, 
Ye call Me Light and see me not, 
Ye call Me Way and walk not, 
Ye call Me Life and desire Me not, 
Ye call Me wise and follow Me not, 
Ye call Me fair and love Me not, 
Ye call Me mighty and honor Me not, 
Ye call Me just and fear Me not; 
If I condemn you, blame Me not." 



Looking backward, it appears to me that nearly 
every piece of good luck I ever had led directly to a bad 
result ; and all the things I thought were bad luck when 
they happened, in the end turned out to be the founda- 
tion of opportunity. — Colonel E. M. House. 



January 13, 1949. THE CHRISTIAN SUN 

Our Christian World Mission-At Home* 

By Rev. Robert M. Kimball. 



As we gather here today, December 
7, 1948, my thoughts go back to a more 
momentous December 7 — December 7, 
1941 — the day that the Japanese fleet 
bombed Pearl Harbor, and the war 
that we had hoped and prayed might 
be avoided, began. December 7, 1941, 
marked the beginning of a new era — 
overnight life changed for hundreds 
and thousands of people. For others, 
the change appeared to come more 
gradually, but for all of us, today, 
seven years later, now that the tur- 
moil of the war has subsided, we are 
conscious that in many respects we 
are living in a new or different world. 

People who have been made home- 
less and penniless by war's destruc- 
tion know that the world will never 
be the same. Families who have lost 
loved ones in battle are poignantly 
conscious of the change, but for many 
of us the changes have been less dras- 
tic, more subtle. There are towns 
which, gradually in this period of 
seven years, have become "ghost 
towns" because families have gone to 
new localities to seek employment. 
Other communities have been over- 
crowded and cannot meet their hous- 
ing needs because of the tremendous 
growth in population ; schools and col- 
leges are overcrowded, in many in- 
stances school buildings are inade- 
quate ; the "teacher problem" has 
long been acute ; on every side we hear 
discussion of the increased rate of 
juvenile delinquency. The tremend- 
ous increase in the cost of living has 
brought many face to face with new 
ecenomic problems, and with it all, we 
are conscious of an undeniable wave 
of worldliness and secularism that is 
pervading our land. As we look out 
upon our world there are some who 
may be saying, "Happy Days Are 
Here Again," but many people are 
harassed and distressed by new prob- 
lems brought about directly or indi- 
rectly by the war. 

Standing in the midst of this new 
or different world is the Christian 
Church — the physical evidence of the 
Spirit of Christ upon earth. Never 
has the church been challenged as it 
is being challenged today to present 
a program that will be adequate for 
the material and spiritual needs of 
people. What an opportunity, what 



*Address delivered by Mr. Kimball, 
Franklin, Va,, at the Fifty-Seventh Annual 
Session of the Christian Missionary Associ- 
ation of the Eastern Virginia Conference. 



a responsibility lies before us as Chris- 
tians ! 

Our denomination has termed this 
opportunity and responsibility "Our 
Christian World Mission." Just 
what does that mean? What is in- 
volved as far as the local church, its 
pastor and its members are concerned ? 

In the first place, it is our Christian 
World Mission to endeavor to bring 
into active participation in the pro- 
gram of the church every member on 
our church roll. As we know, most 
churches have a lot of "dead wood" 
among their membership. Why is 
this true? Maybe some people were 
never really converted, didn't really 
give their hearts to the Lord when 
they united with the church, so that 
while they allowed their names to be 
placed on the church record, they 
never took their vows seriously. Their 
social life and other interests have tak- 
en precedence over the church. Truly, 
most churches need a revival of relig- 
ion. 

Some people have never found a 
place where they really fit into the 
program of the church. There are 
men and women and young people 
who are naturally shy and need a 
great deal of encouragement after 
they unite with a church. Each new 
member needs a "sponsor" so to 
speak, some well established church 
member who will see that the new- 
comer is kept informed of all the 
church events, invited to attend meet- 
ings of the various organization, made 
to feel at home in these meetings and 
so on. It has been said many times, 
that it is much easier to bring new 
members into the church than it is to 
absorb them into the program of the 
church, and that is certainly true. 

Then some churches haven't a 
streamlined program to meet present 
day needs. Some churches don't even 
b ave a program ! Every church needs 
goals — goals for the men, goals for 
the women, goals for the young peo- 
ple, goals for the Sunday school, goals 
for the church as a whole. We have 
got to be on our toes and know about 
all the new helps which our denomina- 
tion is offering, know what ideas are 
working well in other churches, and 
have suggestions to offering for im- 
proving the work and service of every 
department in our church. 

And then, let me say this, we need 
laymen and laywomen on our church 
committees who are open to sugges- 



Page Five. 

tion, who are willing to face realisti- 
cally the needs of the church and com- 
munity, and adapt the program of the 
church to meet these needs. Most of 
the time the Official Board or Church 
Council, or whatever may be the name 
of the governing body in a church, is 
made up of faithful, reliable, whole- 
hearted, Christian men and women 
who will support the church regard- 
less of its program. However, some- 
times loving your church a great deal 
can be a drawback. You become satis- 
fied, you can't see its weaknesses, you 
can't see why anything needs to be 
changed. In order for a church to 
fulfill its Christian World Mission it 
must have a program that is keyed to 
meet the needs of every group in the 
church — children, young people, men 
and women. 

In the second place, a wholehearted 
effort must be made to reach the un- 
churched. There are a great many 
people in every community who are 
not members of any church. Every 
true Christian should have a genuine 
feeling of concern for those outside 
the Christian fellowship. And it 
should be an active concern — the kind 
that constrains men and women to go 
out and work and continue to work 
until people are won to Christ, As 
Christ sent His disciples out two by 
two on an evangelistic tour, church 
members need to go out freouentlv 
visiting in homes, carrying 1 on a "pro- 
gram of personal evangelism. Lay- 
men and laywomen need to be trained 
for this service. Winning people for 
Christ is certainly a great part of our 
Christian World Mission today. 

In the third nlace, in order to fulfill 
our Christian World. Mission we must 
give more money than we have ever 
given before to meet the growina 
needs of the local church. We all 
know about the high cost of living, 
and know that it takes more monev to 
operate a church today than it did 
ten years ago. You need more money 
to rnn your household today. Like- 
wise the church needs more monev if 
it is to fulfill its Christian World 
Mission. Now this is a real problem 
for most churches. But T think we 
can honesty say that every church 
could raise a great deal more for 
home expenses and for benevolences 
if onlv it followed a well-worked-out 
svstem. if it had each year a compe- 
tently directed and executed Every- 
Member Canvass. Too often churches 
relv upon the large contributions of a 
few substantial members to under- 
write their church budsret, they have 
not taken very seriously the "little 
(Continued on page 11.) 



Page Six. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 13, 1949. 



CONTRIBUTIONS | 



SUFFOLK LETTER. 

The new Elon College catalogue is 
beautiful. It is printed on lovely 
soft paper, and bound in the Elon 
colors — maroon and gold. However, 
it is that which is between the covers 
that counts. We can be very proud 
of that, too. Especially do I like that 
announcement on the fly -leaf : "Mem- 
ber of the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools; the 
Association of American Colleges; the 
North Carolina College Conference; 
and of the North Carolina 'Conference 
of Church-Related Colleges." I like 
that phrase "Sixtieth Annual An- 
nouncement." To me the fact that 
our college is a member of the ac- 
crediting association, and that it has 
attained to the age of sixty years 
means something. Most important is 
its rating, and to see that is standard 
A-grade should make us all very hap- 
py and very anxious to keep it that 
way. 

Sixty years! I have not yet seen 
one of the new Alumni Directories, 
but I know that its story is of immense 
importance to our Church. Only 
think of the men and women who 
studied at Elon. Think of the pro- 
fessors who have taught there, and 
those teaching there now. Think of 
the training received in those sixty 
years by thousands of young men and 
women. And think of the service they 
have rendered as ministers of the 
Gospel, doctors, lawyers, teachers, bus- 
iness men and women — and perhaps 
some of the greatest service rendered 
by men and women of Elon has been 
rendered in farm homes throughout 
this Southland. At Elon they caught 
a vision, of that we can be proud. 

Yes, the new catalogue is quite a 
book. It contains 130 pages of im- 
portant information. It lists twelve 
departments of instrucion, which I 
state briefly : English and Dramatics, 
Business Administration, Social 
Sciences, Education and Psychology, 
Philosophy and Religion, Languages, 
Mathematics, Natural Sciences, Health 
and Physical Education, and Fine 
Arts. Many of those departments are 
broken into several divisions, as is, for 
instance, the social and natural sci- 
ences. And just remember that the 
equipment for teaching all these sub- 
jects, and the teachers who teach 
them, must be standard grade to get 
the rating. All that, and the spirit of 



friendship and spiritual concerning 
which is fostered at Elon. 

But I had to sort of rub my eyes 
when I saw that my college of 1917 
now lists one hundred twenty-nine 
seniors, one hundred fifty-six juniors, 
two hundred twenty-two sophomores, 
and two hundred seventy-six fresh- 
men — almost an average of two hun- 
dred for each of the four classes! I 
know that would make the founding 
fathers very happy! May God bless 
to our memory those men of really 
great vision, and help us to measure 
up in doing our part now. They have 
given us a great heritage in more 
ways than one. I intended to tell you 
that additional students not included 
in the above classes brought the total 
fall-of-1948 figure up to eight hundred 
thirty. Even the brief history, the 
description of the buildings, the list- 
ing of the faculty, the description of 
the courses, the names of all the stu- 
dents with their home addresses — all 
these things made interesting reading 
for me. There are so many good rea- 
sons that it should be so. 

John G. Trtjitt. 



SOUTHERN CONVENTION LAY- 
MEN'S FELLOWSHIP. 

Following is a report from the 
chairman of the Laymen's Fellowship 
Committee of the Southern Conven- 
tion to the National Committee on 
Laymen's Work of the Congregation- 
al Christian Churches : 

We have accomplished some things 
in our efforts to organize the Laymen 
of the Southern Convention. We have 
been well impressed and encouraged 
by the response of the average lay- 
man to an appeal for cooperation in 
developing the loeal church as well 
as our churches as a Avhole. We 
should like to mention a few of the 
things that have been accomplished 
in the Southern Convention : 

1. Every church has a chairman 
and a vice-chairman. The most of 
these were elected by the laymen ; al- 
though in some cases appointed by 
the pastor or Superintendent Wm. T. 
Scott. 

2. Every conference has a chair- 
man and vice-chairman. The chair- 
man of each conference along with 
the Laymen Committee of the South- 
ern Convention forms the council that 
governs the work in our convention. 



3. Many of our churches had spe- 1 
cial meetings for the laymen, and | 
some have local improvement proj- * 
ects under way sponsored by the lay- 
men of the church. 

4. We had a very large attendance 
of laymen at the meeting of the South- 
ern Convention in May, 1948. In ad- j 
dition to a special program during the 
Convention, we arranged for a ban- 
quet at which time between 150 and 
175 men met for about two hours to 
enjoy a program at which time Hon- 
orable Thad Eure, Secretary of the 
State of North Carolina, and a mem- 
ber of our fellowship, spoke to the ! 
group. 

5. We planned for a Churchman- 
ship Institute in North Carolina and j 
Virginia. We held our Churchman- j 
ship Institute at Elon College for the 
North Carolina group, but due to the 
polio epidemic the attendance was not 
as large as we had expected. About j 
50 individuals attended this Church- 
manship Institute which was very ; 
profitable to our people. 

6. We observed Layman's Sunday 
on October 17, and the majority of 
our pastors used laymen as the speak- 
er or in some way. gave them special 
recognition on this occasion. We were 
especially encouraged by the coopera- 
tion of our ministers and with the fine 
programs put on by our laymen. 

7. During the year we have mailed 
out several bulletins or News Letters. 
We have not been as consistent in this 
as we would like. We hope to do bet- 
ter in the future. 

Again, we wish to say that we are 
encouraged by the interest of our 
laymen, but we are conscious of the 
fact that they are looking for some- 
one to lead them. There is some doubt 
in our minds if sufficient leadership 
can be furnished without a fulltime 
employee. Men with jobs that tie 
them down each week-day cannot 
make the necessary contacts and meet ! 
with enough local church groups to 
get the job done as it should be in 
the Southern Convention. Some of 
us have hopes our Convention Office 
will find it possible to put on a full- 
time man to work with the Laymen's 
Fellowship and promote stewardship 
and evangelism. 

Geo. D. Colclough, 

Chairman. 

Note: Mr. Colclough is a member 
of the Executive Committee of the 
National Laymen's Committee of the 
Denomination. 



Confidence is a plant of slow growth 
in an aged bosom. — William Pitt. 



■ 



January 13, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Seven. 



News of Elon College 

By President L. E. Smith 



CHRISTIAN LIVING. 

II. IN THE COMMUNITY. 

A community is composed of a 
number of families living in homes 
located in a given area. These homes 
may be closly related as to location or 
widely separated. It is the people 
who live in the houses and not the 
houses themselves that make the com- 
munity. The character of the people 
determines the character of the com- 
munity. If the people are good the 
community is good. If the people 
are bad the community is bad. 

No community in this country is 
considered complete or desirable with- 
out a church and school facilities for 
introducing the children to the reali- 
ties of life through instruction and 
training, and preparing them to take 
their places in the community and to 
make their contributions to the on- 
goings of society. In a Christian 
country one cannot be his best or give 
his best separate and apart from God. 
The church wtih its hymns, its inspira- 
tions, its prayers, and its prophecy is 
essential to the individual in his search 
for God and the forces that will help 
him to build a good life for home, 
community, and country. 

No one spends his entire time in his 
own community. Interest and neces- 
sity take him beyond its borders. As 
he goes out and comes in, family and 
neighbors observe his steps. If he is 
honorable in his going out and com- 
ing in, he is respected, honored and 
loved. He becomes a benediction to 
his home and a blessing to his com- 
munity. He has found the secret of 
living in Christ and the power that 
makes him victorious over self and 
conquerer of evil with its blight. 

When we think of our responsibili- 
ty to help the children in our com- 
munity to discover the best that God 
has given them and to make it possible 
for them to be the men and women 
that God expects them to be, surely, 
we want to grow up in a community 
with right influences, high ideals and 
compelling opportunities. 

This sounds good, but it is not easy 
to build a community of this char- 
acter today. There are so many evil 
institutions and influences that are 
determined to force their way into 
every community and entrench them- 
selves in the habits and life of the peo- 



ple. Amusements and games, perfect- 
ly harmless of themselves, but when 
they consume the Sabbath of these in- 
dividuals who give themselves to them 
they become a desecration and the 
breeders of irreverence and distrust. 
The saloon, the A. B. C. stores, and 
the houses of ill fame go hand in hand. 
Where one is the other will come. 
These defame good names, wreck char- 
acters, and destroy souls in time and 
for eternity. Only yesterday, I read 
a story in a daily paper published in 
a great city, telling of the determina- 
tion on the part of the city fathers to 
close up the houses of ill fame and 
drive out the prostitutes. This was 
not true in that cky in prohibition 
clays. That which deadens the mind 
and inflames passion is dangerous to 
character and corrupting to morals. 

Are we aware that at this particular 
time legalized liquor, with all of its 
evils is fighting its way back into the 
community and society under the pre- 
tense of increased revenue that may 
be used for playgrounds, recreational 
facilities, and better schools? That 
may be true, but who wants these add- 
ed advantages at the price of homes, 
of decency, of character, of human 
life, and of the souls of men ! Would 
any community consider paying such 
a price for added revenue regardless 
of its financial stringency. 

In our day old communities are be- 
ing extended, new communities are 
being formed, and population is on 
the increase. There are many more 
people alive and much more living 
being done in the world than ever be- 
fore. May Ave make sure that this in- 
creased living is Christian living — 
where those with plenty shall share 
with those who otherwise would exist 
in want ; where the strong will protect 
the weak ; where, as of old, ' ' everyone 
helped his neighbor and everyone said 
to his brother, Be thou of good cour- 
age ; ' ' where the Christian shall make 
available to the non-Christian every 
Christian grace and persuasion that 
he, too, may become Christian and 
give his service and influence of Chris- 
tian living that the whole community 
may be Christian. 

If you would have your community 
be a good community, be sure that 
your life is a good life. Faith begets 
faith and Christian living becomes a 



transforming influence for good in 
any community. 



APPORTIONMENT GIVING. 

We are now in the conference period 
as designated by the Convention. Dur- 
ing January and February, the Con- 
vention has directed that in churches 
and Sunday schools, information 
should be given concerning the col- 
lege, its opportunities, its responsibili- 
ties, and its needs. That the Sunday 
schools and churches should be given 
to understand their responsibilities in 
the matter of the support, financial 
and otherwise, of our college. In 
1947-48, we failed by $553.90 to send 
to the college its full apportionment. 

We start the new year with one con- 
tribution from one church in the East- 
ern Virginia Conference, our church 
at Franklin. This is a good start- 
Many of our churches in the Conven- 
tion could do as much and I am sure 
that others will as the weeks pass. We 
are grateful for the support given the 
college during the past year and earn- 
estly pray for the continuation of the 
same. 

Churches. 

Eastern Va. Conference : 
Franklin Church $ 200.00 

Grand total $ 200.00 



FOUNDATION GIVES $8,500 FOR 
GYMNASIUM. 
(Continued from page 2.) 
decision to grant the gift, noted that 
the Burlington organization has shown 
a continuing interest in the progress 
of Elon College. Not only have sub- 
stantial contributions been made by 
the Foundation in previous years, but 
the college also has been the benefi- 
ciary of gifts from the May-McEwen- 
Kaiser Company, now a division of 
Burlington Mills. 

The trustees of the Burlington 
Foundation, in making available the 
money for the gymnasium, pointed 
out the close connection which has ex- 
isted between Burlington Mills and 
Elon. At present, more than twenty- 
five alumni of the college are em- 
ployed by the company. In addition, 
the physical plant of the college is lo- 
cated near a large number of Burling- 
ton Mills plants in Alamance and 
Guilford counties. 

The gift, as the trustees have set 
forth in a statement of policy, is part 
of a continuing program of ' ' develop- 
ing youth and furthering the basic 
ideals of American life through help- 
ing the privately-endowed Christian 
colleges. ' ' 



Page Eight. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 13, 1949. 




SEEING OUR MISSION DOLLARS 
IN ACTION. 

By Dr. W. W. Sloan. 

Have you been in Alaska, Hawaii, 
the Canal Zone, Pureto Rico or the 
Virgin Islands, outlying possessions of 
the United States which are our home 
mission study theme this year? Mrs. 
Sloan and I hadn't either, except for 
the Canal Zone. Therefore, we asked, 
why not investigate for ourselves? 
We could be away from the College 
two weeks and the Shallow Ford 
Churh would be glad to be rid of us 
a little while, so why not go to Puerto 
Rico and the Virgin Islands for 
Christmas? 

Consequently we left Raleigh at 
8 :00 Sunday night, December 19, and 
the next afternoon took a plane from 
Miami to Puerto Rico, more than a 
thousand miles southeast, arriving at 
San Juan airport at 10:30 Puerto 
Rician time. A Puerto Rican girl, 
Carmen Rodriguez, who was a stu- 
dent at Blon last year met us and took 
us to Robinson School, a splendid 
grade and high school founded by the 
Methodists. The next morning after 
a walk in which Mrs. Sloan held num- 
erous conversations in Spanish we 
were met by Dr. Charles I Mohler, 
the superintendent of the United 
Evangelical Church of Puerto, a union 
of Congregational Christian and 
Evangelical - United Brethern 
Churches. He had worked out an ex- 
tensive itinerary for us whereby we 
were able to see much of the Protes- 
tant work on the Island. Dr. Mohler 
first introduced us to Dr. Florencio 
Saez, our Congregational Christian 
faculty member of the Evangelical 
Seminary of Puerto Rico, the school 
in which all Baptist, Methodist, Pres- 
byterian, Disciples of Christ as well 
as United Evangelical ministers are 
trained. Dr. Saez, who is dean of the 
Seminary, was most generous in tak- 
ing us about the Seminary and the 
University of Puerto Rico, then show- 
ing us points of interest in the ancient 
walled city of San Juan and intro- 
ducing us to various leaders. 

Wednesday we started around the 
Island, going to the western extreme- 
where at Mayaguez we visited the 



work of the Presbyterian and the 
Episcopal schools and churches and 
the Marina Neighborhood House. We 
also went up into the mountains and 
saw the rural community work being 
begun by the Presbyterians. Our next 
visit was to San German and the 
Polytechnic Institute, a college much 
like Elon, organized by the Presbyte- 
rians but now inter-denominational 
"Poly" is the only four-year liberal 
arts college on the Island apart from 
the University and is doing a great 
work in developing leaders. 

The day before Christmas we went 
to Ponce (named for Ponce de Leon 
whose tomb we had visited at San 
Juan). Here the Christian Church 
work was started many years ago by 
Dr. D. P. Barrett now retired and liv- 
ing at Chapel Hill. We saw several 
churches started by him and spent 
the night in the home of Rev. Juan 
R. Romero who was baptized at the 
age of thirteen by Dr. Barrett and is 
now pastor of the church he joined at 
that time. Mr. Romero did not tell us, 
but a few days later a celebration was 
held honoring the 25th anniversary of 
Mr. Romero 's ordination. 

In the summer of 1947 Mr. Romero 
was sent to the Deering ministers con- 
ference in New Hampshire. He showed 
us a little book of greetings to him 
made at that time. Among others we 
found well - wishers signed by our 
Christian Sun editor, Mr. House, 
and Rev. Raymond T. Grissom then 
of Sanford. 

Our third Pureto Rican Christmas 
program, one of the best we have 
ever seen, was attended at one of our 
Ponce churches. We also went to 
Christmas Eve midnight mass at the 
cathedral and found one of the numer- 
ous influences made on the Roman 
Church by our Protestant work — 
congregational singing. The Puerto 
Ricans love to sing, but only recently 
has the Roman Church given them a 
chance to sing in church services. 

Christmas morning we saw the ex- 
tensive printing plant where all the 
church literature of the various Prot- 
estant churches on the Island is print- 
ed. That afternoon Ave crossed the 
southeastern corner of the Island by 



the old Spanish military road to the 
headquarters of our denomination's 
work, Humacao, where we were guests 
of Superintendent and Mrs. Mohler at 
Ryder Memorial Hospital. The Moh- 
lers were away for part of Christmas. 
While eating supper at a restaurant 
on the hot paved plaza we heard above 
the Spanish voices a juke box blaring 
in English, "I Am Dreaming of a 
White Christmas." We wondered 
what this meant to a people who had 
never seen a snow flake. 

Sunday Avas a busy day visiting 
churches and making addresses 
through an interpreter. Mrs. Sloan 
had a great advantage. She could say 
twice as much in a given time as she 
spoke in Spanish. I have preached 
through many interpreters in various 
parte of the world but my richest ex- 
perience came Sunday night when 
Mrs. Sloan stood beside me in the pul- 
pit and translated my sermon into 
Spanish. 

Part of Monday and Tuesday was 
spent at Yuquiyu our new rural work 
in the mountains of the northeast 
corner of the Island. The work here 
was started by the Friends or Quak- 
ers as a Civilian Public Service camp 
in Avhich conscientious objectors made 
a very definite contribution to a more 
Christian Avorld. Since the war two 
of these families have stayed on and 
a third has been added under the 
sponsorship of our United Evangeli- 
al Church AAdiich is doing so much to 
evangelize the people of the eastern 
end of Puerto Rico. 

A "publica" (cross betAveen bus 
and taxi) enabled us to complete the 
circle of the Island, bringing us 
through the city of Carolina to San 
Juan Avhere another busy period, in- 
cluding an address to the nurses of 
the Presbyterian Hospital and din- 
ner at the home of our former Elon 
student, proceeded a visit by plane 
to the Virgin Islands, another night 
at Robinson School and our return to 
the States by a plane that made stops 
in the Dominican Republic, Haiti and 
Cuba. Our plane's reaching Miami 
an hour late necessitated a Avild rush 
across the city to catch our train north 
in time to attend a New Year's party 
of our Shallow Ford young people 
after five thousand miles of travel in 
thirteen days. 

What A'alues did we find in our 
Protestant work in Puerto Rico and 
the Virgin Islands? I shall attempt 
to ansAA'er this next week. We took 
quite a few motion pictures. If they 
turn out to be any good we may be 
able to share them with some of our 
church groups. 



January 13, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Nine. 



Church Women at Work 

With Emphasis on Missions 

Mrs. W. J. Andes, Editor 
637 S. Sunset Drive, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



QUOTATIONS FROM MILWAUKEE. 

[Taken from Mrs. I\ 0. Lester's account 
of her trip to the National Assembly of the 
United Council of Church Women, Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin.] 

"If some form of family worship 
would be restored to the American 
family, it would do more good than 
any ten resolutions we could pass. ' ' 

"If the Church does not put down 
the evils of racial and minority dis- 
crimination, secular idealism- will." 
(This is where Communism is making 
its appeal in many parts of the 
world.) 

# # # 

"The only test for Christian social 
action would be to bring the people 
to whom we send our foreign mission- 
aries over here, let them see how we 
live in our country, and say, 'This is 
the Christian way to do things.' " — 
President La-wry of Wooster College. 

"A house is a building where peo- 
ple dwell. A home is a dwelling where 
people are built. ' ' 

"In a Christian home, a child is a 
person laughed with, not at ; respect- 
ed, not tolerated ; guided, not co- 
erced ; directed, not driven ; a con- 
tributor, not merely being served; 
loved for himself, not just for self- 
satisfaction which comes from over- 
powering love. A growing person in 
the company of other growing per- 
sons. ' ' — Alice Goddard, Children 's 
Work, International Council of Re- 
ligions Education. 

# * * 

"The family that prays together, 
stays together. — Mrs. 8. M. Shoemak- 
er, wife of rector of Calvary Episco- 
pal Church, New York City. 

# # # 

' ' Worship of God is one thing ; ser- 
vice to man is another. Worship with- 
out the other is dishonest. Service 
without the other is superficial." — 
Rath Haefner., Oregon Council. 



ANGIE CREW'S NEW ADDRESS- 

Angie Crew (along with all other 
missionaries in Japan) has been reg- 
istered and given an A. P. O. number. 
This means that packages can go to 
her as to soldiers (up to 70 lbs.) with- 



out bother about custom tags, listing 
what is in them, etc. It also means 
that air mail letters may be sent to 
her for 6c, as to any place in the U. S. 
This is a great help to us and clears 
up any confusion about how to send 
mail to Angie. This makes it much 
simpler to send packages to Angie 
and gives us more assurance that they 
will reach her promptly. Now per- 
haps we can send more packages and 
letters to her. This is her address : 

Angie Crew 

H. Q. Kobe Base 

APO 317 

cio Postmaster 

San Francisco, California. 



HAW RIVER SOCIETY. 

The Women's Missionary Society 
of the Haw River Congregational 
Christian Church held its regular 
monthly meeting in the home of Mrs. 
W. J. Pearson, Monday evening, De- 
cember 13, 1948. 

The meeting was called to order by 
the president, Mrs. Artelia Poole. Mrs. 
J. R. Barker read the scripture les- 
son after which Mrs. J. W. Simmons 
led in prayer. The program which 
centered around Christmas was given 
by the pastor, Rev. E. T. Farrell. 

Christmas carols were sung by the 
entire group, with a special solo by 
Mrs. Frank Bain. 

The society is planning a basket for 
an old lady and an invalid daughter 
to cheer them up for Christmas. 

Delicious refreshments were served 
by the hostess after which Christmas 
gifts were exchanged. 

Mrs. E. N. Byrd, 

Reporter. 



NEWS FROM INGRAM, VIRGINIA. 

The Missionary Society of our 
church has made a good start on the 
new year's work. We meet in the 
homes of the members sometimes and 
sometimes we hold our meetings at 
church. 

We are using the program material 
in the packet and find it very inter- 
esting and helpful. We have used 
this material for several years and re- 
commend it to societies not using it. 

We observed World Community 
Day at our church, inviting the other 



churches of the Community. Our 
pastor, Rev. Robert T. Woodruff Jr., 
assisted by Rev. Wiley Hogue, pastor 
of the Oak Level , Presbyterian 
Church, led the program. We felt 
challenged and inspired to do our 
best to help make a chaotic strife- 
torn world a little better. We sent 
eight "Pack-a-Towel" bundles from 
our church. The other churches sent 
theirs through their own fellowship. 

We have two bags from Church 
World Service, which we plan to fill 
and send in the very near future. 

On Tuseday evening, November 7, 
Mrs. Wiley Hogue of the Presbyteri- 
an Church reviewed in a very inter- 
esting way the book On Our Own 
Doorstep at our chursh, with the 
members of the societies of both 
churches invited. 

We felt a deep sense of responsi- 
bility for the spiritual welfare of the 
people of our out-lying possessions. 

For our December meeting we met 
at the Church School assembly room. 
An interesting Christmas program 
was presented and after the program 
and business were over, gifts were 
exchanged and refreshments served. 

For our January meeting, we had 
a brief study of the brochure, "Re- 
port on China." Later in January 
we will have our review of China — 
Twilight or Dawn, by Mr. F. C. 
Whellon, one of our members. 

Our pastor plans to teach the book 
of Galations in a series of lessons 
beginning in the near future. 

Mrs. Leroy Adams, 

President 



CHILDREN'S WORK. 

An Interdenominational Workshop 
of Children is being planned by the 
regional denominational leaders of 
Christian Education in North Caro- 
lina to be held on February 25 and 
26, 1949, at the First Presbytesian 
Church, Durham. All those who 
work or would like to work with chil- 
dren in church schools are invited to 
attend. 

This workshop is to provide pratical 
training and experience in methods 
and techniques of creative teaching of 
children and to give opportunity for 
sharing ideas across denominational 
lines. 

The Workshop begins on February 
25 at 10:00 A. M. and closes at 1:0*0 
P. M. February 26th. The delegates 
to the Workshop will divide into 
three age groups — Kindergarten, Pri- 
mary, and Junior to consider how to 
teach creatively their respective age 
(Continued on page 14.) 



Page Ten. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 13, 1949. 



\ FOR THE CHILDREN j 

$ Mrs. R. L. House, Editor \ 



i 



When a little girl was asked what 
she had in her month, she replied, ' ' I 
do not have no something in my 
month." Her answer was complete 
if not correct speech. One of the 
problems all boys and girls must face 
is that of speaking good English. 
Children in the South also need to 
learn to speak without drawling and 
dropping the ends of their words. 
It is all right to have a southern ac- 
cent, but use good diction ! 

There is another problem — that of 
slang. Some slang expressions or 
words of local use have real meaning. 
I recall Dr. N. G. Newman telling of 
the man using "tote." To carry is 
proper, but ' ' to tote ' ' means to grasp 
the article (heavy though it be) tight- 
ly in one 's arms and take it to its des- 
tination. I like goobers for peanuts, 
too, but please young users of slang — 
what does "jeepers" mean? Has it 
to do with jeeps? A few slang ex- 
pressions may add color to conversa- 
tion but — "Ah, yeh, no foolin', huh? 
hones'? jeepers, ye did, golly," etc., 
are poor substitutes for good strong, 
useful words. I do not agree with 
people who think all words must be 
short and simple. The majority of 
vulgar and profane words are four- 
letter words. Not enough people use 
expressive words. Words like pun- 
gent, arrid, patina, etc. Why not use 
them ? 

There is the matter of using pro- 
fanity, the bad words. I don 't believe 
in mouthwashing with soap. Tell 
your mother or father not to use bad 
words and you won't! Of course, 
some of them are learned from play- 
mates or school friends, but if mother 
will not keep reminding you, you may 
soon forget them. Perhaps she should 
tell them to you and then tell you some 
better words of exclamation. A few 
weeks ago I heard of a young woman 
who had a new system for bad words. 
Instead of blurting them out — she 
practiced relaxing the ugly wrinkles 
that came to her face as she strained 
and frowned to say them. It is easier 
to splutter and shout than to unhook 
the tiny muscles controlling brows 
and mouth. I haven't heard of any- 
one who was helped by their explosion. 
Often the person will clap a hand over 
their mouth in a horrified apology. 
But it is too late. Never used, no 
problem with this set of words. 



We learn the words we hear about 
us. Some little folk learn more quick- 
ly than others. We learn words by 
hearing stories and reading them. As 
we grow older, we learn to look for 
unknown words in the dictionary. Do 
you know the old, old nonsense rhyme : 
"Poor old dromedary, Swallowed a 
dictionary ! " ? 

There are several dictionaries for 
the very small. One of these is 
called "A Child's First Picture Dic- 
tionary" and may be ordered from 
The Methodist Publishing House, 
Richmond, Va., or Wonder Books in 
New York for 59c. There are pictures 
explaining each word. It has the 380 
words that are the basic ones for read- 
ing in the first and second grades. 

Let me say as I have many times 
before, that the words of the King 
James Version of our Bible are beau- 
tiful and useful. Learn them ! Do 
you know that in addition to meaning,. 
words have stories? We can learn 
how they got to be words. The word 
tawdry which means bright, gay and 
somewhat shabby, came from St. Au- 
brey's Fair. 

It became necessary for me to learn 
many medical terms and words when 
I was past college age, and the spell- 
ing was difficult, but I am glad that I 
learned them. 

No one is ashamed of knowing good 
words. Our days would be empty 
if we could not read or write or talk. 
Your parents can help you by an- 
swering your questions and explain- 
ing new words. I heard a little boy 
at Christmastide say to his mother, 
"Oh, look at the beautiful leaves on 
the Christmas tree." Then she an- 
swered, "It is beautiful but they are 
not leaves, but needles. There are 
needles on the trees that stay green, 
or 'evergreen' as we say. There are 
needles for sewing, and the needles 
used by doctors. " Do you see how she 
was helping him? There are those 
who regret we have words with more 
than one meaning but since we do, 
let's learn them and use them! 



FATHER KNEW BEST. 

By Mabel-Ruth Jackson. 

Issued by the National Kindergarten 
Association. 
It was Sunday afternoon, and Mr. 
Merkle was reading the sports sec- 



tion of the paper and feeling nicely re- 
laxed and comfortable. 

His wife was fondly watching their 
small son, Billy, who was trying to 
build a house with his blocks. His 
childish fingers had not yet learned 
how to carry out some of these new 
wishes of his, and every little while 
the structure would tumble down 
and he would have to begin all over 
again. 

Mrs. Merkle tried to read, but her 
attention wandered to the absorbed 
youthful architect, and when his 
house toppled for the fourth time, she 
laid her book aside, a helpful gleam in 
her eyes, and started to rise. "Moth- 
er '11 show — " she began. 

"Don't!" said her husband unex- 
pectedly, looking over the top of his 
paper. 

"Don't what?" she asked uncer- 
tainly. 

"Don't do it for him," Mr. Merkle 
answered with a quizzical smile. 

"I was just going to show him 
how," his wife protested, flushing. 

' ' But he knows how. He knows he 
has to put one block on the top of 
another. All he has to learn now is 
to balance them properly so they'll 
stay in position. ' ' 

"Well — can't I show him that?" 

' ' He 's learning how to do something 
by himself, dear, and that's very im- 
portant. He'll succeed, too. Maybe 
it won't be a nice, straight house like 
you would build for him, but it'll be 
his very own. Don 't you see ? ' ' 

Reluctantly Mrs. Merkle settled 
back into her chair. "Well, perhaps 
you're right," she conceded, "but — " 

' ' Take my word for it, Claire, I am 
right. Mother was like you — like most 
mothers. She wanted to do things 
for me. Sometimes such help is all 
right, but there are other times when 
a mother should keep 'hands off' and 
let her child work out things for him- 
self. 

' ' I remember I was to make a paper 
knife in my Boy Scout work. I was 
awkward at handwork and, after cut- 
ting a few slivers from a piece of 
wood, I complained, 'Shucks, I can't 
make this knife ! ' 

" 'Let me see it,' Mother said. In 
a very short while she made the piece 
of wood look like a knife. I cut at it 
a bit more and handed it in." 

' ' What was wrong with that ? ' ' 

' ' Can 't you see, Claire ? Can 't you 
see that Mother took away my initia- 
tive and denied me the satisfaction of 
accomplishment ? The knife itself did 
not matter. It was the doing it that 
counted. That was the purpose of 
(Continued on page 14.) 



January 13, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Eleven. 



Youth at Work in the Church 

Ann Truitt, Editor; Helen Jackson, C. B. Twidd-y, Assoiates. 



JOINT MEETINGS AT GRAND 
RAPIDS. 

Of the many inspiring features of 
the Grand Rapids Meeting of the 
United Christian Youth Movement, in 
my opinion the fine fellowship experi- 
enced between the Evangelical and 
Reformed and Congregational Chris- 
tian delegates was tops. From the 
time we arrived until Ave bid fond 
farewells the spirit of union was in 
the air. In fact, within a very short 
time "mergers" were being consum- 
mated between individuals within our 
two groups. 

In addition to the morning program 
which included the entire Conference 
there were denominational meetings 
held in the afternoon. Tuesday aft- 
ernoon each denomination met as a 
unit and became acquainted with one 
another from the various sections of 
the country. Plans were discussed 
pertaining to the present status of the 
denomination. 

Wednesday through Saturday the 
delegate s from the CC and E&R 
churches met jointly to discuss and 
plan for the coming merger. The 
Spirit of these meetings was one of 
high hope for the consummation of 
the union. Wednesday afternoon in- 
teresting skits were given depicting 
the beginnings of the two youth or- 
ganizations. Discussion of the me- 
chanics of the merger were throughly 
discussed and plans were made to 
bring these into reality. 

Thursday through Saturday the 
delegates were divided into four 
groups as follows: Group 1 — Proj- 
ects; Group 2 — Program Materials; 
Group 3 — Social Action; Group 4 — 
Summer Programs. 

A very comprehensive survey was 
made in each of these groups of the 
problems confronting the youth of 
our denominations in these fields. 
Specific recommendations have been 
made and will be used in formulating 
policies of our merged organizations. 

Friday night the ball room of the 
Rowe Hotel in Grand Rapids was 
packed with the delegates from our 
churches. Games were led by recrea- 
tion directors from our two denomi- 
nations. A royal time was enjoyed 
by each person present. The climax 
came with the "formal wedding" of 
Mr. E. & R. and Miss CC. This wed- 



ding was complete with everything 
from the irate father of the bride to 
the weeping relatives of both the 
bride and groom. However they were 
weeping for joy instead of sorrow. 
The evening was well spent and the 
memories of that time of fun and 
felliwship will long remain in the 
minds of the delegates. 

Sunday after the service of the 
Holy Communion we started back to 
our local churches realizing that ' ' the 
fellowship of kindred minds, js like 
to that above." Grand Rapids not 



REV. ARTHUR R. DETWILER. 

only provided us with the opportun- 
ity to understand and appreciate 
young people of the other protestant 
denominations, but it also provided 
the way for the youth of our two 
churches to become better acquainted 
and to lay firm foundations for our 
coming union. 

Arthur R. Detwiler, Pastor, 

Guilford Charge 

Whiisett, N. C. 

Note : Mr. Detwiler was an E. & 
R. delegate from the Southern Synod 
to the Grand Rapids Meeting last 
September. He is very active and 
interested in young people's work. 



surprising difference. Nothing will 
prove of greater benefit to the life of 
your church than to have each mem- 
ber giving as he is able to the work 
of Christ. To have church members 
realize their stewardship responsibili- 
ty is one of the most important goals 
of our Christian World Mission today. 

Finally, we must give more gener- 
ously than ever before to support the 
Missionary Enterprises of our church. 
Since the war the calls for missionary 
aid have increased on every hand. If 
we would share in our Christian 
World Mission at Home, we must be 
ready and willing to support to the 
fullest the Home Mission Projects of 
the Southern Convention. That means 
Elon College, the Christian Orphan- 
age and the work the Christian Mis- 
sionary Association is doing. 

Our denomination as a whole, is be- 
ing called upon to build twenty-five 
new churches each year and to lend 
support to many existing churches. 
The Christian Missionary Associ- 
ations of the Southern Convention 
are assisting in the work in a credit- 
able way. When we consider the 
work done and the progress being 
made by the churches in Eastern Vir- 
ginia to which we give aid, Ave are 
glad for the privilege of sharing in 
this AvorthAvhile enterprise. 

As Ave go back to our homes, and 
back to the work of our local churches, 
I hope that each of us will be conscious 
of the fact that our denomination is 
launching a mighty, new campaign to 
help win the Avorld for Christ. This 
new campaign is called "Our Chris- 
tian World Mission." Every church 
member is being called upon to share 
in this new enterprise. To be a part 
of this great forward moment means 
that we will have to give of our time, 
our talents and our money more gen- 
erously than ever before. It is a great 
responsibility, but also a great privi- 
lege to be working with Christ to 
build a Christian world. Let us pray 
for strength and courage sufficient for 
our task. 



CHRISTIAN WORLD MISSION. 
(Continued from page 5.) 

drops of water, little grains of sand. ' ' 
But just as drops of Avater make a 
mighty ocean, so the small, regular 
contributions to the church make a 



Before I started on my trip around 
the world, someone gave me one of 
the most valuable hints I have ever 
had. It consists merely in shutting 
your eyes when you are in the midst 
of a great moment, or close to some 
marvel of time or space, and convinc- 
ing yourself that you are at home 
again with the experience over and 
past; and what, would you wish most 
to haA T e examined or done if you 
could turn time and space back again. 

— William Beebee. 



Page Twelve. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 13, 1949. 



Sunday School Lesson 

By Rev. H. S. Hardcastle, D. D. 



JESUS AND THE PREPARATORY 
MINISTRY OF JOHN. 

Lesson IV — January 23, 1949. 
Memory Selection: "Repent for the 

Kingdom of Heaven is at hand. — 

Matthew 3 :2. 
Lesson: Mathew 3; Luke 3:l-23a; 

7 :18-35 ; John 1 :19-34. 
Devotional Reading : Luke 1 :59-67, 

65-80. 

The Herald of the Kingdom. 

John the Baptist was the herald of 
the Kingdom. Set apart from his 
birth, indeed even before his birth, to 
the service of God, he had lived most 
of his life in the outlying districts, in 
the barren, bleak places on the edge 
of the desert, known as the wilderness. 
His simple fare and his rugged, out- 
door life had given him a sturdy body 
and a strong constitution, and a raw 
courage, both physical and moral. Liv- 
ing much alone through all those 
years amid the silence and the solem- 
nity of the desert, he had thought and 
brooded over the ways of men, and 
the will of God. As a boy he had un- 
doubtedly been told the stories of the 
strange circumstance of his own birth 
and the story as told later in Luke's 
gospel, of the prophecies concerning 
the birth and mission of his cousin, 
Jesus. And also of his relation to the 
coming of the promised Messiah, the 
Christ of God, and of his mission as 
the herald of His coming, the one who 
should prepare the way for Him. 
Somehow — we know not just how — 
l nt somehow, and surely the convic- 
tion deenened within him that God's 
hour had struck, and the striking of 
the hour galvanized him into action. 
He came forth from his seclusion and 
besran to preach in the wilderness of 
Judea. His words crackled and 
blazed. Like his illustrious predeces- 
sor of old, Elijah, he was a prophet or 
preacher of fire. His words had a 
snap and a sting in them that stirred 
the consciences of those Avho heard 
him. Folks began to talk about him, 
and soon great crowds of people were 
nocking to hear him, even though they 
had to go even as far as from Jerusa- 
lem to hear him. 

The Coming of the Kingdom. 

"The kingdom of heaven is at 
hand." As stated above John felt 
that God's hour had struck. The new 
order was at hand. The kingdom of 



heaven was about to be ushered in. 
God was about to fulfill His promise 
to work a new thing. To be sure John 
did not understand all the implica- 
tions of the term, the kingdom of 
heaven. And he thought it would 
come in a different way in which it 
was, and is, to come. But Jesus him- 
self said that it was with the preacing 
of John that the Kingdom of God was 
preached (Luke 16 :16 and Matthew 
11 :12) and that in a sense it began 
with him. 

Getting Ready for the Kingdom. 

"The kingdom of God or of heaven 
is at hand "that was only a part of 
John's message, the last part. The 
first was ' ' Repent. ' ' When John came 
preaching he said, ' ' Repent ye ; for 
the kingdom of heaven is at hand." 
The word means literally "change 
your mind " or " purpose differently. ' ' 
Its fuller meaning might be stated in 
this sentence which I quote from an- 
other writer, ' ' Repentance is primari- 
ly a change of mind which issues in 
regret and in change of conduct." 
True repentance is deep and thorough- 
going. It means a changed life. And 
a changed life has the witness of works 
suitable to repentance. The Baptist 
was not asking people to be emotional 
or sentimental about their sins; he 
was summoning them to an about- 
face, to a changed life within that 
found a changed expression without. 
They were not ready for the coming 
of the kingdom. And a great many of 
us have got to change our lives before 
the kingdom of heaven can come eith- 
er in our own lives or in the com- 
munity and the Avorld in which we 
live. 

"Gentlemen, the King." 

The Kingdom was embodied in the 
King. John himself knew that and 
proclaimed it. When men asked him 
about it all, he frankly said that it 
was not in him or of him. He was 
simply the forerunner, the herald of 
the King. And with a graciousness 
not always conspicuous in some serv- 
ants of Christ, John was willing to 
decrease in order that Christ might 
increase. Unlike many leaders, John 
sought to turn men to Christ, rather 
than to win a personal following. 
Ministers need to take care lest peo- 
ple "join them" instead of joining 
the church or joining Christ. It is 



signipcant, too, that John pointed to 
Jesus not so much as the King as the 
Lamb of God. "Behold the Lamb of 
God which taketh away the sin of the' 
world," said he as he pointed out 
Jesus to his disciples. 

The King Consecrates Himself 
To the Task. 
We need not suppose that Jesus 
had not committed himself to the Fa- 
ther's will and work until his bap- 
tism. Even as a lad of twelve, as we 
have seen in a previous lesson. He 
felt that He "must be about the Fa- 
ther's business." But at His bap- 
tism He publicly and permanently 
consecrated Himself to His divinely- 
appointed and self-accepted ministry. 
It goes without saying that He was 
not baptized as a symbol of the wash- 
ing away of His sins, for He was sin- 
less — "in Him was no sin." But at 
His baptism He identified Himself 
with our humanity, and He publicly 
and irrevocably consecrated himself 
to do the Father's will. And God 
sealed the covenant by confessing the 
the Son even as the Son had confessed 
the Father. ' ' This is my beloved Son, 
in whom I am well pleased, ' ' said the 
voice out of heaven. " Jesus had the 
proper credentials. God put His stamp 
of approval on His Son. We Avill do 
well to hear Him. 

The King That Was Different, and the 
Kingdom That Is Different. 
Everything started out so well. 
John was so enthusiastic and so suc- 
cessful. But as Ave read on we come to 
a strange interlude. We find that the 
man Avho had been sent to prepare the 
Avay for the Christ, now sends a dele- 
gation of his friends to ask Jesus if 
after all He is the Christ. Somehow 
or other He didn't seem to fit in with 
the picture. He was no man of fire. 
He did not have an axe hewing right 
and left and laying things waste. He 
was not OA r erthroAving the enemies of 
Israel from Avithout, or overpowering 
the forces of evil Avithin Israel forci- 
bly. He Avas not acting like a king, 
if He were the King. "Art thou he 
that should come, or look we for an- 
other ? ' ' was the plaintive and pathetic 
cry of this same John who a little 
while before had so courageously and 
so confidently heralded the coming of 
the King. We must remember that 
John Avas then in prison, inactive, 
shut up, and shut off from the freedom 
of the Avide open spaces, like and even 
worse than an eagle in a cage. And 
Jesus Avas not doing the things that 
John had said He Avould do, and that 
John thought He should do. The 
(Continued on page 15.) 



January 13, 1949. THE CHRISTIAN SUN Page Thirteen. 

Replies to "A Blue Preacher on a Blue Monday" 



By Rev. Bernard V. Munger, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

So — you get discouraged when you 
see the disparity between the glorious 
promise of the message God wants 
proclaimed and the results which fol- 
low its proclimation ? You get dis- 
couraged when you compare the trans- 
formation your God promises to be 
possible, with the transformation 
which actually takes place in men 
about you? And, to meet this dis- 
couragement, you want a word from 
your brethren. Let me humbly sug- 
gest my "word" to you. 

Go get your Bible, friend. There's 
a book called Jeremiah in the Old 
Testament. Get very well acquainted 
with the man whose name that book 
bears. You '11 soon recognize that your 
problem was his problem, your dis- 
couragement was his discouragement. 
If you get to know him well, and do 
as he did with his problems and dis- 
couragements, you'll discover that his 
God can be your God, too, and that 
will be one true answer to your ques- 
tions. 

There are four books in the New 
Testament called Gospels. Get very 
well acquainted with the Central Fig- 
ure in those books. Can you think of 
anyone who taught more truth, and 
was more misunderstood? Can you 
think of anyone who made greater 
proclamations of promise, and had lis- 
teners who laid hold of so little of 
what was promised? Can you think 
of anyone who spoke and lived more 
lovingly, and yet whose followers did 
not love Him enough to pray with 
Him an hour in a moon-lit garden, 
whose followers didn't love Him 
enough to be with Him in His hour 
of trial, whose frind Peter denied 
knowing Him, and whose disciple Ju- 
das betrayed Him? Can you hear 
Him on that occasion when His dis- 
course upon the Bread of Life ended 
as His hearers walked away from him, 
and when He turned to His frinds, 
saeying: "Will you also go away?" 
As you have followed Him thus, has it 
been made clear to you that He set 
His will to the business of doing His 
Father's Will, and, let whatever cir- 
cumstances and results follow, He 
continued faithful unto the end, find- 
ing His strength, and His joy, in do- 
ing that single thing ? When you get 
discouraged, remember Jesus your 
Lord, and renew your fellowship with 
Him, that His Spirit might be in you ! 
(Continued on page 15.) 



By Mrs. Hazel T. Williams, 
Norfolk, Va. 

Please permit me to answer the 
questions asked by " A Blue Preacher 
on a Blue Monday. ' ' The title of this 
article in last week's Christian Sun 
is, "How Can a Man Continue to 
Preach." 

First, we start with God. "In the 
beginning ..." we're told, God cre- 
ated our world. If we actually be- 
lieve God, we'll accept all of His 
written word. Then start from there. 

A beautiful lily just blooms — one 
stalk pointing to our Master. We can 
be like the lily, and the fragrance of 
Christ-like character permeates our 
being, so that others "see Jesus in 
us." As we enter a shady grove of 
trees we don't see the lilies, yet we 
are conscious of the dainty perfume, 
and we reflect the Christ by faith and 
trust. 

Because God in Christ is our pat- 
tern, we keep our eyes on Him, spirit- 
ually, and refuse to hear siren sug- 
gestions that torment us, and try to 
cause us to doubt. Our Father, and 
His abiding peace. We put our lives 
on the altar, and God accepts our 
gift, then we determine to put into 
action that which we know, viz. : 
' ' Jesus saves to the uttermost. ' ' The 
world - renowned missionary, Carey, 
preached seven years before one con- 
vert was saved for Christ. Then be- 
fore that in his shoe shop, mending 
shoes, he'd walk nineteen miles on 
Sunday to preach. How can we doubt 
God, when His word is true. 

Why do we search for a sign ? We 
have the word become flesh. It would 
often encourage us to have our hear- 
ers listen and accept our message im- 
mediately, yet even Jesus was hin- 
dered from doing some mighty works 
in His own village because of unbelief. 
We wish to witness for God, when He 
calls us, and even the least of these 
are most precious to their Lord, and 
are bought with a price. Suppose we 
were in the days of John Wesley. 
There have been circuit riders who 
made every appointment by horse- 
back, over mountains and across 
streams, often hungry, sometimes liv- 
ing for days on berries. The early 
days of Salvation Army, and many 
other leaders of long ago endured 
hardness as a true soldier of God, 
never living to see any reward of their 
efforts, yet praising God to the high- 
est with their dying breath. 

(Continued on page 15.) 



By Murray A. Carson, 
Portsmouth, Va. 

Paul writes to the Philippians 1 :9 
(Moffatt's Translation): "Have a 
sense of what is vital." My deepest 
conviction arises from the stark truth 
of this timely assertion, that now of 
all times the greatest need is for the 
resurgence of the Gospel, interpreted 
in its broadest sense into terms of 
thought and action directly bearing 
upon the times in which we now live. 

Those of us who feel that we still 
want to preach, can only do so if we 
determine to ' ' have a sense of what is 
vital" at all times. Central in the 
sense of what is vital should be our 
caution and purpose to keep our lives 
of spiritual communion clear, so that 
thought and pathos (feeling) from 
the Godhead reach us freed from prej- 
udice and ignorance. 

To accomplish this art so necessary 
to the vivified expression of eternal 
truths, it is a must that we be domi- 
nated with the sense of our mission to 
the ever-increasing tempo of souls on 
the march ! Indeed, we must feel 
that we are the channels through 
which heaven flows. 

Has there ever been a time when 
the Eternal God employed other than 
the means of human agency to convey 
His enlightenment and purpose to the 
world ? Was there ever a time when 
Jesus was not obsessed with the sense 
of His mission, its purpose, and the 
Sender ? 

What would have happened in post- 
ascension days if the disciples and 
apostles had lost their sense of what 
was vital? Or if Saul of Tarsus had 
stubbornly remained at the feet of 
Gamaliel, and continued in fierce op- 
position to the followers of Jesus ? Or 
further, if he hd not heeded the goad- 
ings of his conscience, and his mind 
had remained clouded to that glori- 
ous revelation on the road to Damas- 
cus ? 

Answering then this query, "How 
can a man continue to tell the Christ- 
mas story of the birth of One who will 
save His people from their sins, when 
sinfulness so abounds in the lives of 
those who know the story best ? " it is 
well to repeatedly recall the human 
testimony of the Scriptures whose 
great characters would have been 
voiceless in this or any other age had 
they not prepared to yield major con- 
siderations to the inner shrine of their 
natures, in order to meet the true 
(Continued on page 15.) 



Page Fourteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 13, 1949. 



(aiaMSMSMSjaMBisjaiaisfaiajajaiaMSjaiaiaiaiais 



I The Orphanage 1 

1 Chas. D. Johnston, Supt. i 

Dear Friends: 

This financial report brings our re- 
ports for the year, 1948, to a close. 
Our next letter will be in regard to 
the year, 1949. You will notice from 
our financial report that we did not 
reach our financial goal, which I re- 
gret very much. It is the first goal I 
have ever set and failed to reach. I 
did want to reach this one so badly 
and make the year, 1948, the best 
year yet ; but not so. I assure you 
that we did our very best to reach it. 

We received from the churches dur- 
ing the year, 1948, the sum of $21,- 
786.01. We received from Special 
Offerings, offerings from others out- 
side our churches, the sum of $22, 
628.73, making a grand total of $44,- 
414.74. 

I want to express to our church 
people and friends our heartfelt 
thanks for their loyalty and coopera- 
tion during the year, 1948. 

Chas. D. Johnston, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT FOR DECEMBER 30, 1948. 
Sunday School Monthly Offerings. 

Amount brought forward $20,920.17 

Eastern N. C. Conference : 

Auburn S. S $ 17.14 

Morrisville 2.86 

Wentworth 23.14 

43.14 

Eastern Va. Conference : 

Franklin $117.00 

Mt. Carmel S. S 6.85 

Christian Temple S. S. . . 20.00 

143.85 

N. C. & Ya. Conference: 

Bethel S. S $ 3.60 

Ingram S. S 17.04 

Liberty 7.80 

Pfafftown 25.00 

Reidsville S. S 19.00 

Salem Chapel 24.00 

96.44 

Western N. C. Conference : 

Flint Hill (R) $12.00 

Hank's Chapel 8. S 16.08 

Pleasant Union S. S 13.62 

Ramseur S. S 26.61 

Seagrove 25.00 

Zion S. S 76.10 

169.41 

Va. Valley Conference: 
Linville 15.39 

Ala. Conference : 
New Hope S. S 1.55 

Total $ 469.78 

Thanksgiving Offerings. 

Eastern N. C. Conference: 

Lee's Chapel $10.08 

Mt. Herman 14.50 

24.58 

Eastern Va. Conference: 
Franklin 128.00 



N. C. & Va. Conference : 

Durham $ 2.00 

Reidsville S. S 221.48 

223.48 

Western N. C. Conference: 

Big Oak 20.00 

Total $ 396.06 



Total from churches this week $ 865.84 



Total from churches this year $21,786.01 
Special Offerings. 

Amount brought forward $22,393.73 

Mrs. Black, children $ 20.00 

Suffolk Welfare Dept. . . 30.00 

Jr. Philathea Class, Suf- 
folk Church, Harvell 
boys 2.50 

A Friend 5.00 

J. B. Taylor, rent 50.00 

Mabel Haiti, rent 2.50 

Interest, Bateman Loan . . 25.00 

Mr. & Mrs. C. W. Foushee 

Beatriz Foushee 0.00 

Dr. George Carrington . . 25.00 

Mrs. Kinch, children .... 15.00 

Carlton's Hardware Co. . . 50.00 

235.00 

Total this year from 

Special Offerings $22,628.73 

Grand total for the week . . $ 1,100.84 

Grand total for the year . . . $44,414.74 



CHILDREN'S WORK. 
(Continued from page 9.) 
group. .Special attention will be giv- 
en to the use of music and of recrea- 
tion in the Church School. An ad- 
dress on the Task of the Churrh and 
the Home Teaching will be delivered 
to the whole conference and open to 
the public on the night of February 
•25, 1949. 

Miss Frances C. Query, Field Rep- 
resentative of the North Carolina 
Council of Churches with headquar- 
ters in Durham, is serving as chair- 
man. Registration Cards and Infor- 
mation Sheets can be secured either 
from Miss Query or from sponsoring 
denominational leaders as follows : 
Baptist General Convention (Ne- 
gro) — Mrs. Ellen S. Alston. 
Congregational Christian (Negro) 

— Miss Nezzie Carter. 
Disciples — Rev. Thomas P. Inabi- 
nett. 

Episcopal-East Carolina Diocese — ■ 
Rev. J. F. Ferneyhough. 

Episcopal-N. C. Diocese — Miss Ele- 
anor Snyder. 

Evangelical and .Reformed—Miss 
Jessies Leonard. 

Friends — Miss Ruth Day 

Lutherans (United) — Mrs. E. K. 
Bodie. 

Moravians — Rev. John Fulton. 
Presbyterian U. S. — Miss Rosanna 
Barnes. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

The following is the Treasurer's 
Quarterly Report of the Woman's 
Missionary Convention of the South- 
ern Convention of Congregational 
Christian Churches for the third quar- 
ter, second year, Biennium, 1947-49 : 
Receipts. 
N. C. Conference: 

Women $2,774.34 

Young People 34.76 

Juniors 39.96 

Cradle Roll 18.27 

$2,867.33 

Va. Valley Conference: 

Women $ 236.08 

Young People 108.85 

Juniors 1.60 

— 346.53 

Eastern Va. Conference : 

Women $2,498.05 

Young People 295.10 

Juniors 126.32 

Cradle Roll 28.30 

2,947.77 

Total Receipts $6,161.63 

Disbursements. 
Home Missions, 

General Fund $1,100.00 

Young People's Home 

Mission Fund 114.95 

Elon Orphanage 10.00 

$1,224.95 

Foreign Missions, 

General Fund $1,100.00 

Young People's Foreign 

Mission Fund 114.96 

Thank Offering, Shaowu 136.38 

Shaowu Mission 20.50 

1,371.84 

$2,596.79 

Thank Offering for C.W.V.R. . . 3,118.50 
Unseen Guest Fund 25.25 

Check to Dr. Scott $5,740.54 

Check to Mrs. Leathers, Treas., 
Life Membership & Memorials 
(savings) — 8 Life Memberships 

and 11 Memorials 190.00 

Total disbursements $5,930.54 

Cash in Bank 231.09 



$6,161.63 
Mrs. W. V. Leathers, 
January 8, 1949. Treasurer. 



FOR THE CHILDREN. 
(Continued from page 10.) 
having me make it — achievement. 
Every time a child accomplishes some- 
thing by himself, he has done a little 
to shape his character correctly — to 
make him more able to stand alone, 
on his own two feet. ' ' 

Just then Billy gave a little crow of 
delight, and his father and mother saw 
that he had indeed completed his edi- 
fice — a shaky one to be sure, but it 
stood. Billy gazed at it gravely and 
sighed with satisfaction. 

"See?" observed Mr. Merkle. 

"I give in," smiled his wife, "and 
I'll remember to keep my hands off." 



January 13, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Fifteen. 



REPLY TO "BLUB PREACHER." 
By Rev. Bernabd V. Munger. 
(Continued from page 13.) 

There are several other books, ' ' The 
Acts," and many "Epistles," all of 
which will serve to remind you of the 
work of Paul. Get very well acquaint- 
ed with him. Compare your situation 
with his, compare your congregation 
with his Corinthian congregation! 
Then go through his letters and be 
simply overwhelmed by the trium- 
phant nature of his faith, the sturdi- 
ness of his confidence, and the perse- 
verance he exhibited. Recognize that 
the victorious life of Paul, can be 
yours. That is what Paul wanted his 
hearers and readers to know. That is 
why he shared his experiences so free- 
ly with them. That 's why they are all 
there in those New Testament records. 

When you are doing this reading, 
you'll want to be praying. Let me 
suggest that you find a place for the 
following prayer in your devotions, at 
least once each week : 

"0 God, I go out each day into a 
world where it is not easy to remem- 
ber Thee. But, so did Jesus. I am 
tempted to believe in the power of 
evil as stronger than the power of 
God. But, so was Jesus. I walk in 
the midst of crowds to whom the re- 
ality of this world alone appears con- 
vincing. But, so did Jesus. I am so 
often disappointed in someone whom 
I had believed I could trust. But, so 
was Jesus. Help me to remember 
Him. By His unshaken faith, help 
me to keep faith. By His unswerv- 
ing righteousness, help me to keep try- 
ing to do right. By His witness to 
the power of Thy world of Spirit and 
Life, keep me from this worldly think- 
ing and lift my affections up to the 
highest that I know. By His patience 
with those who disappointed Him, help 
me to be patient and forgiving, con- 
scious of my shortcomings, and most 
of all concerned that my Master need 
not be disappointed when He looks at 
me. In His Name, I bring this 
prayer. Amen. ' ' 



REPLY TO "BLUE PREACHER." 
By Murray A. Carson. 
(Continued from page 13.) 

condition of spiritual hearing and 
discernment. Sinfulness will always 
be present while mortals are flesh- 
clad. It will abound where ignorance 
and intolerance are. It will remain a 
factor in every human life as a thing 
engendered by abuse and misuse of 
the laws of God. It is the spawn of 
the finite and earthly. 



Its dispeller and enemy is light and 
enlightenment whose rays are strong 
or weak according to the faith and 
perseverence that goes into the act of 
containing the all-source by raising 
mental and spiritual antennae to the 
point of blending! The day of Pen- 
tecost happened just that way, and by 
its upheaval the ministry of the Christ 
mind was further assured a marching 
world. The world march is on J With 
rhythmical militant step they mark 
epoch after epoch, only by those 
things which meet and measure the 
ebb and flow of good into men's souls, 
and translated into though and deed 
for the common welfare ! 

We lose the power to presuade when 
we lose our faith in God as the Source 
of all supply. And virtue is gone from 
us when the belief in angels is gone. 
Hosts invisible, whose charge we are, 
fail to inspire us, for we are then 
without vision ! We should rejoice 
daily in the expectancy of continued 
revelation because we have kept our 
lines clear, and the birth of Christ is 
a daily advent in our lives. 

To answer this question of "How 
can a man continue to preach the 
transforming power of God in Christ, 
when he can't discover the fruits of 
that power in the lives of his parish- 
oners?" it is well to remember that 
he who imparts knowledge of the God- 
head, can only do so, speaking from 
the background of his or her experi- 
ence. If that experience includes a 
constant sense of vital contact with 
God, and the mind is not biased by 
the coldly intellectual outreach of aca- 
demic pursuit, then will the windows 
of the soul be opened to the inspira- 
tional out-pourings of Divine truth. 
The transforming power of God in 
Christ will lay hands upon them, and 
they will become living demonstra- 
tions. 

The truth is that our personal scrut- 
iny of others, is limited to the finer 
range of vision that exists within our- 
selves. Beyond that we cannot see! 
Therefore, to see the power of God at 
work transforming the lives of others 
to whom the truth is preached, we 
must first see the fruits of that power 
at work within our humble selves ! 



REPLY TO "BLUE PREACHER." 
By Mrs. Hazel T. Williams. 
(Continued from page 13.) 

Blue Preacher's Monday should never come, 
For each day brings us "one more day near- 
er home." 

If sometimes people seem self -centered, and 
thoughtless, too, 

Remember the Fifth Gospel is the one writ- 
ten according to you I 



You can preach if you're "called," 
God's power will bring increase, 
No one can afford to doubt, ever — 
His word will not return void! No, never! 

On this Highway of Life, as we travel, 
We find others stumble, often on the way. 
The blessing will come to us — 
If we give each one a helping hand today. 

When we think we have patience, 
Or that we're quite a nice person, too, 
That leaves God out of the question — 
So, what is the Gospel according to you? 

My heart desires to be unseen of others, 
Yet take my place when God calls, 
And He'll give me the Word 
To say to others, as I humbly pray: Help 
me, dear Lord! 

So cheer up, Blue Preacher, 

Seeds planted for souls, will yield fruit some 

day, we know; 
Let's trust God, prove Him, 'tis His Word, 
And praise His name through weal or woe! 



SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON. 
(Continued from page 12.) 
Master with that spiritual genius and 
insight and sympathy did not break 
the bruised reed or quench the smok- 
ing flax. He told John's messengers 
to take a look around the place and 
then tell their leader what they saw — 
the blind were seeing, the lame were 
walking, the sick were being healed, 
and the poor had the good news 
preached to them. There is a message 
there for those today who think that 
the Kingdom is coming in some great 
cataclysm, in some catastrophic in- 
tervention, by some divine overpower- 
ing. The Kingdom cometh not with 
observation, said Jesus later. The 
Kingdom is not dependent upon or 
correlative with some special political 
or social or economic theory, and it 
will not be brought in by military al- 
liances or physical power. It is not 
meat and drink, but righteousness 
and peace and joy in the Holy Spirit. 
Jesus shall rule, but He shall rule by 
love. He shall conquer through suf- 
fering and sacrifice. And He shall 
reign forever and ever. Amen. 

The King and the Herald of the 
Kingdom. 

Jesus held John in high regard. In 
His opinion of all those who had been 
born of women, there had not risen 
one greater than John the Baptist. 
But John was under law and the 
Master quickly added that "he that 
is least in the kingdom of heaven is 
greater than he." (John the Baptist.) 



Happy salesmen not only multiply 
their volume of business and their in- 
come, they also multiply themselves. 

— Walter Russell. 



January 13, 1949. 



The Christian Workers Conference 
at Elon College 

Official notice is hereby given that the second annual Christian Workers 
Conference will be held at Elon College January 23-27, inclusive. At the 
suggestion of some of our ministers, the program has been shortened so as 
to close on Thursday night. 

We are presenting an unusually strong program. Dr. Rockwell Harmon 
Potter, Dean Emeritus, Hartford Theological Seminary, Hartford, Conn., 
will speak to the ministers. Dr. Howell Davies, Stewardship representative 
of our United Church, will bring a series of addresses on Stewardship. 
President Allan S. Meek of the Theological Seminary of the Evangelical 
and Reformed Church, located at Lancaster, Pa., will deliver a series of 
addresses on Evangelism. Dr. Meek is one of the foremost ministers of 
the day and a leader in his denomination. Dr. Elbert Conover, Interna- 
tional representative on church planning and architecture, will address the 
conference on Church Building, planning, and landscaping. Dr. Sylvester 
Green, editor of the Durham Herald-Sun, will address the conference on 
"Publicizing the Christian Gospel." He will give instructions as to how the 
minister and the local church may cooperate with the public press in the 
matter of getting church news to the community and to the public. 

We feel that this will be a most helpful program and trust that the 
pastors of our churches may find it possible to attend. It certainly would be 
a profitable experience to any minister. 

EXPENSES 

Registration $1.00 

Room and board (per day) 3.00 

Meals 

Breakfast .60 

Lunch .75 

Dinner. . .. : ,,' 1.00 

All persons attending the conference will be expected to register even 
if they do not remain on the campus and take their meals at the dining hall. 
Your cooperation will be appreciated. 

Notice of intention to attend should be sent as early as possible to L. E. 
Smith, President, Elon College, N. C. 



1844 * Over a Century of Service to the Denomination - 1949 

The CHRISTIAN 

ORGAN OF THE SOUTHERN CONVENTION OF CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 
In Essentials, Unity — In Non-Essentials, Liberty — In All Things, Charity 




Volume CI. 



RICHMOND, VA., THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1949. 



Number 3. 



"We Would Be Building" 




Ground-breaking ceremonies were held at our church in Sanford, North Carolina, on Sunday morning, 
January 9. As members of the congregation watch, A. H. Mclver breaks ground for the new building. 
Others standing in foreground are (left to right) : Rev. C. C. Dollar, pastor; Mrs. Ralph Cline, chair- 
man of the building fund committee; and Miss Stella Stout, treasurer of the building fund. Mr. 
Mclver is supervisor of the building program and chairman of the church's board of trustees. Work has 
been started on the building. Plans call for a two-story addition to the present structure to facilitate 
an adequate program of education and recreation, the brick veneering of the present building, together 
with a face-lifting job on the church front and spire. The cost of the completed building, unfurnished, 
is estimated at $33,000. The completion of the job is anticipated by late spring. 



Page Two. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 20, 1949. 




night. A Candlelight Service was 
held here and at Pfafftown. 



The annual meeting of the Virginia 
Council of Churches will be held in 
Richmond, January 25-26. 



Assurance comes from Rev. R. A. 
Whitten that Winchester will reach 
its goal of fifteen new subscribers. 



A service of presentation and dedi- 
cation of the Rowland Memorial Li- 
brary was held in First Church, 
Greensboro, on December 20, 1948. 



The Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary at Louisville, Ky., is erect- 
ing a new $60,000 apartment build- 
ing for use by furloughed mission- 
aries. 



Rev. B. J. Earp of High Point has 
been ill with the flu but is out and 
going again. Good reports are con- 
tinually coming from our church in 
High Point. 



Rev. Joe A. French resigned Sun- 
day, January 9, as pastor of the Reids- 
ville Church, to become the pastor of 
the Lanett (Ala.) Congregational 
Christian Church. 



The Eastern Virginia ministers in 
session Monday at Suffolk, heard mes- 
sages by Supt. Scott and Rev. Emer- 
son Smith, director of the department 
of race relations of the Virginia Coun- 
cil of Churches. 



Rev. Thurmon Bowers, pastor of 
Happy Home Church, reports that 
the church added twelve new Chbi&- 
tian Sun subscriptions to its present 
list of twenty-five. What this fine 
rural church did, others can do if they 
will but try. 



Miss Ruth Helen Gunn, a member 
of our Happy Home Church, has re- 
turned from the Camp Sutton Hos- 
pital for polio victims and is thriving 
at her home. She attended church 
last Sunday, January 9, for the first 
time since last summer when she was 
stricken. 



Santa Claus not only treated the 
children of the Winston-Salem Sun- 
day school, but every member. The 
old folks enjoyed it more than the 
children. Approximately one hun- 
dred people attended both the Christ- 
mas party and pageant held the same 



Salem Chapel (located near Win- 
ston-Salem) is using in a methodical 
way the church envelopes for each 
member's giving to the church. This 
promotes regular individual giving. 
Belews Creek Church, located near by, 
has adopted a better financial plan 
this year and both churches are hap- 
py to have Rev. Allan Hurdle as their 
pastor. 



PROGRAM OP CHRISTIAN WORK- 
ER'S CONFERENCE. 

Following is the program of the 
Christian Workers' Conference to be 




DR. HOWELL D. DAVIES. 

held at Elon College, N. C, January 

23-27, 1949 : 

Sunday — Morning Session. 

11:00 Sermon — Dr. Roekewll Harmon Pot- 
ter. 

Sunday — Afternoon Session. 

3:00 Laymen's Meeting — Mr. George D. 

Colclough, Presiding. 
3:30 Address: "Making and Spending 
Money — Tested by the Christian 
Gospel" — Dr. Howell D. Davies. 
4:30 Address: "The Layman as an Evan- 
gelist" — Dr. Allen S. Meek. 
6:00 Banquet. 

Adjournment. 

o — ■ 

Monday — Morning Session. 
10:00 College Chapel— Dr. Potter. 
11:00 Stewardship Conference. 

Address : "The Theology of Steward- 
ship" — Dr. Davies. 
12:00 Adjournment. 
12:45 Lunch. 

Monday — Afternoon Session. 
2 : 00 Evangelism Conference. 

Address : "The Preacher as an Evan- 
gelist" — Dr. Meek. 
3:00 Stewardship Conference. 

Address: "Leadership in Steward- 
ship" — Dr. Davies. 
4:00 General Conference Period. 
Evangelism — Dr. Meek. 
Stewardship — Dr. Davies. 
Church Architecture — Dr. Conover. 
6:00 Dinner. 



Monday — Evening Session. 

7:30 Address: "The Passion of the Evan- 
gelist"- — Dr. Meek. 

: — o 

Tuesday — Morning Session. 
9:00 Conference on Evangelism— Dr. Meek. 
10 : 00 College Chapel— Dr. Potter. 
11:00 Address: "The Tithe as an Expres- 
sion of Stewardship" — Dr. Davies. 
Tuesday — Afternoon Session. 
2:00 Address and Discussion on Church 

Architecture — Dr. Conover. 
4:00 General Conference Period — Drs. Con- 
over, Meek and Davies. 
Tuesday — Evening Session. 
7:30 Address: "The Personal Praetice of 
Stewardship" — Dr. Davies. 

o 

Wednesday — Morning Session. 
9:00 Address: "The Method of the Evan- 
gelist" — Dr. Meek. 
10:00 College Chapel— Dr. Potter. 
11:00 Conference on the Work of the Pas- 
tor — Dr. Potter. 

Wednesday — Afternoon Session. 

2 : 00 General Conference Period — Drs. Pot- 
ter and Meek. 
3:00 Address: "Publicizing the Christian 
Gospel" — Dr. Sylvester Green. 
Wednesday — Evening Session. 
7 :30 Address: "The Message of the Evan- 
gelist" — Dr. Meek. 

o 

Thursday — Morning Session. 
9:00 Visit College Classes. 
10:00 College Chapel— Dr. Potter. 
11:00 Address: "The Life of the Evange- 
list" — Dr. Meek. 
Thursday — Afternoon Session. 
2:00 Visit College Laboratories. 
3:00 Recreation. 

Thursday — Evening Session. 

7:30 Address — -Dr. Norman Vincent Peale. 
Expenses: Registration Fee— $1.00; 
Room and Board — $3.00 per day. 
Individual Meals: Breakfast, 60e; 
Lunch, 75c; Dinner, $1.00. 



SPECIAL MEETING OF GENERAL 
COUNCIL CALLED. 

The Executive Committee hereby 
calls a Special Meeting of the General 
Council of the Congregational Chris- 
tian Churches to convene at The 
Cleveland Hotel, on Friday, February 
4, 1949, at 9:30 a. m., in Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

This meeting is called to determine, 
in accordance with the vote of the 
General Council on June 22 1948, 
whether the percentage of the 
churches voting approval of the Basis 
of Union with the Evangelical and 
Reformed Church, and of the Inter- 
pretations of that Basis of Union 
adopted by the General Council on 
June 22, 1948, is sufficient to warrant 
the consummation of the union ; if the 
percentage be found sufficient, to take 
the steps necessary to consummate the 
union; and to consider and act upon 
such other business as may properly 
be brought before it. 



January 20, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Three. 



\ Southern Convention Office 



Rev. Wm. T. Scott, Superintendent 



SUMMARY OF REPORTS OF CONFERENCE COMMITTEES ON 
BUDGET AND APPORTIONMENT. 

Ambassador Francis B. ,Sayre, the likely — if we remain indifferent or 
representative of the United States in apathetic. Only a sense of the reality 
the Trusteeship of the United Nations (Continued on page 14.) 

APPORTIONMENT TABLE— EASTERN N. C. CONFERENCE. 



NAME OF CHURCH 



Amelia 

Antioch 

Auburn 

Bethel 

Bethlehem. ...... 

Beulah 

Catawba Springs . 

Chapel Hill 

Christian Chapel . 
Christian Light. . 

Clayton 

Damascus 

Ebenezer 

Fuller's Chapel . . . 

Good Hope 

Hayes Chapel — 

Henderson 

Hope Mills 

Lebanon 

Lee's Chapel 

Liberty, Vance. . . 
Martha's Chapel . 

Moore Union 

Morrisville 

Mt. Auburn 

Mt. Carmel 

Mt. Gilead 

Mt. Herman 

New Elam 

New Hope 

Niagara 

Oak Level 

O'Kelly's Chapel. 

Piney Plain 

Pleasant Hill 

Pleasant Union . . . 

Plymouth 

Pope's Chapel 

Raleigh 

Sanford 

Shallow Well 

Six Forks 

Southern Pines . . . 
Turner's Chapel . . 

Wake Chapel 

Wentworth 

Youngs ville 



Convention 
Home Missions* 


Convention 
Foreign Missions t - 


o 

OS 

a 

ft 

O 


Elon College 


Christian Education 


Superannuation 


Convention Fund 


Per Capita Dues 


Ministerial Scholar- 
ship Fund 


Conference Fund 


Totals 


$ 30 


$ 30 


$ 22 


$ 22 


$ 7 


$ 7 


$ 18 


% 8 


$ 3.50 


$ 7 


$ 154.50 


15 


15 


17 


17 


7 


7 


12 


8 


3.50 


7 


108 50 


56 


56 


48 


48 


14 


14 


29 


8 


6.50 


13 


292^50 


30 


30 


22 


22 


7 


7 


18 


2 


3.00 


7 


148.00 


13 


13 


6 


6 


3 


3 


11 


g 


1 50 


3 


65 50 


30 


30 


18 


18 


7 


7 


18 


22 


2^00 


5 


157^00 


58 


58 


91 


91 


15 


15 


33 


10 


7.00 


15 


393.00 


40 


40 


34 


34 


11 


11 


24 


4 


5.50 


11 


214.50 


38 


38 


31 


31 


9 


9 


21 


10 


6.50 


13 


206.50 


45 


45 


45 


45 


14 


14 


25 


12 


5.50 


11 


261.50 


35 


35 


33 


33 


11 


11 


21 


10 


3.50 


7 


199.50 


35 


35 


29 


29 


9 


9 


21 


7 


2.00 


7 


183.00 


38 


38 


45 


45 


11 


11 


24 


10 


4.00 


9 


235.00 


38 


38 


33 


33 


9 


9 


24 


9 


4.50 


9 


206.50 


25 


25 


18 


18 


7 


7 


15 


8 


2.50 


5 


130.50 


25 


25 


18 


18 


7 


■ 7 


15 


5 


2.00 


5 


127.00 


63 


63 


94 


94 


20 


20 


35 


19 


8.50 


15 


431.50 


33 


33 




28 


9 


9 


15 


3 


2.00 


5 


165.00 


20 


20 


18 


18 


5 


5 


14 


3 


2.00 


5 


110.00 


20 


20 


19 


19 


5 


5 


14 


5 


2.50 


5 


114.50 


177 


177 


216 


216 


45 


45 


82 


28 


19.50 


37 


1,042.50 


20 


20 


12 


12 


7 


;:.i,7 


14 


6 


2.00 


5 


105.00 


30 


30 


12 


12 


9 


9 


18 


8 


3.50 


7 


138.50 


13 


13 


21 


21 


9 


9 


U 


4 


4.50 


9 


114.50 


76 


76 


91 


91 


30 


30 


38 


8 


7.50 


13 


460.50 


30 


30 


21 


21 


7 


' 7 


18 


' 8 


3.00 


5 


150.00 


56 


56 


34 


34 


14 


14 


29 


14 


6.00 


11 


268.00 


25 


25 


34 


34 


7 


7 


15 


6 


1.50 


5 


159.50 


88 


88 


62 


62 


18 


18 


43 


22 


8.50 


17 


426.50 


38 


38 


30 


30 


11 


11 


21 


18 


4.50 


9 


210.50 


13 


13 


10 


10 


4 


4 


9 


2 


6.50 


13 


84.50 


38 


38 


31 


31 


11 


11 


21 


8 


4.50 


9 


202.50 


8 


8 


5 


5 


1 


1 


9 


2 


1.00 


3 


43.00 


56 


56 


52 


52 


14 


14 


31 


6 


5.50 


11 


297.50 


30 


30 


39 


39 


9 
14 


9 


18 


7 


3.50 


7 


191.50 


56 


56 


61 


61 


14 


26 


12 


3.00 


6 


309.00 


30 


30 


39 


39 


9 


9 


18 


11 


3.50 


7 


195.50 


38 


38 


36 


36 


9 

23 


9 


21 


8 


4.50 


9 


208.50 


101 


101 


73 


73 


23 


45 


25 


9.50 


19 


492.50 


63 


63 


82 


82 


14 


14 


32 


16 


6.50 


13 


385.50 


56 


56 


54 


54 


14 


14 


29 


14 


5.50 


11 


307.50 


13 


13 


7 


7 


4 


4 


11 


10 


1.00 


3 


73.00 


63 


63 


63 


63 


14 


14 


32 


16 


7.50 


13 


348.50 


30 


30 


42 


42 


9 


9 


18 


6 




7 


193.00 


114 


114 


220 


220 


20 


20 


55 


18 


14.50 


25 


820.50 


30 


30 


56 


56 


14 


14 


18 


8 


2.50 


5 


233.50 


20 


20 


15 


15 


9 


9 


14 


4 


3.00 


5 


114.00 


$1,999 


$1,999 


$2,087 


$2,087 


$ 536 


$ 536 


$1,103 


$ 464 


$ 220.50 


$ 448 


$11,479.60 



•Includes Church Extension, 
tlncludes Shaowu Project. 

who has had unequalled opportunity 
to observe world conditions makes the" 
following statement: "Millions of 
people are facing hunger and destitu 
tion. Far worse, hundreds of mi 
lions of people are losing their se: 
of the goodness of life. The precio 
values upon which happiness is builtl 
are being strangled. We stand today 
at the parting of the ways. On the 
one hand it is entirely possible that 
the present 'cold war' is only a second 
interlude in a fifty or hundred years' 
war which began in 1914 and which 
will make Western civilization but a 
memory and usher in a new Dark Age 
of savagery until in the distant future 
some new young civilization will 
evolve. This is not only possible but 



The Christian Sun 

Established 1844 by Rev. Daniel W. Kerr. 

A Religious Weekly for the Home, devoted 
to the interests of the Kingdom as represent- 
ed by the Congregational Christian Churches. 
Our Principles. 

1. The Lord Jesus Christ is the only 
Head of the Church. 

2. Christian is a sufficient name for the 
Church. 

3. The Bible is a sufficient rule of faith 
and practice. 

4. Christian character is a sufficient test 
of fellowship and Church membership. 

5. The right of private judgment and the 
liberty of conscience is a right and a privi- 
lege that should be accorded to aud exer- 
cised by all. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor Robert Lee House 

Managing Editor John T. Kernodle 

Associate Editors — J. B. Allen, H. Q. Couu- 
cill Jr., J. H. Dollar, F. B. Eutsler, S. C. 
Harrell, R. M. Kimball, B. V. Munger, 
J. E. Neese, W. W. Sloan, H. S. Smith. 
Corresponding Editors — J. F. Apple (E. N. 
C), W. M. Stevens (N. C. & Va.), F. C. 
Lester (W. N. C), J. G. Truitt (E. Va.), 
R. A. Whitten (V. Va.). 
Departmental Editors — Wm. T. Scott, Con- 
vention; Mrs. W. J. Andes, Women's 
Work; Miss Elizabeth Chicoine, Young 
People's Work; Mrs. R. L. House, Chil- 
dren; L. E. Smith, Christian Education; 
Clias. D. Johnston, Orphanage; H. S. 
Hardcastle, Sunday School. 
Board of Publications — W. J. Andes, S. E. 
Madren, W. M. Stevens, W. E. Wisseman, 
T. F. Wright. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Six Months $1.00 

One Year $2.00 

Published by the Board of Publications, 
agent for the Southern Convention of Con- 
gregational Christian Churches, and printed 
every Thursday except the last in June and 
December by the Central Publishing Co., 
Inc., Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Post 
Office at Richmond, Va., July 25, 1922, un- 
der Act of March 3, 1879. 

Remittances for subscriptions should be sent 
to the Convention Office, Elon College, 
N. C. 

All other matters of business should be ad- 
dressed to The Christian Sun, 1536 East 
Broad Street, Richmond, 19, Va. 
Contributions should reach the editor at 
3206 Grove Aw-mie. Richmond, 21, Va 




Page Four. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 20, 1949. 




*S ]v[XSSAGE, 




GUIDANCE IN CHURCHMANSHIP. 

The ministry and laity need guidance in evangelism, 
church architecture, stewardship and religious publicity. 
The hope of our church lies in the proper orientation 
and motivation of evangelism. Architectural guidance 
is essential during this unprecedented renaissance of 
church building, and those who have a zeal for God in 
this particular but not according to knowledge may 
inadvertently have the sins of the church fathers visited 
upon the worshipping children to the third and fourth 
generation. How can our Christian World Mission be- 
come a glorious reality unless it is undergirded with a 
sound program of stewardship? The church in every 
age must seek adequate means of publicizing the gospel. 

Does your church have all the answers to these 
questions ? Is your organization functioning with maxi- 
mum efficiency along all these lines? If so, the rest of 
our churches would like to sit at your feet. If not, your 
church should be represented at the Elon Workers' Con- 
ference. 

A wealth and variety of leadership beckon us all to 
Elon. Dr. Conover brings the vast wisdom and ex- 
perience of the Interdenominational Bureau of Archi- 
tecture to the Southern Convention. Dr. Davies speaks 
out of a wide experience with the large churches and 
conferences of the Midwest. Dr. Meek represents a 
communion with a commendable and enviable record 
of churchmanship. Dr. Potter hails from the citadel 
(or one of the citadels) of Congregationalism. Dr. 
Green has had marked success in varied fields of Chris- 
tian service. 

The editor covets for every church the privilege 
of sharing in this important conference. All roads should 
lead to Elon next week. 




Rev. Emmet Frazer, director, was re-elected. Com- 
mendable work has been done. Let us continue to 
preach the Kingdom of God. 

There is a tendency among prisoners and patients in 
State institutions, the Rev. Mr. Frazer explains, to feel 
that nobody cares whether they are- dead or alive. This, 
he claims, makes them careless and cease desiring to lead 
better lives. 

Sunday morning finds Chaplain Frazer setting out 
to visit institutions and to conduct worship services ac- 
cording to a definite schedule. 

On the fourth Sunday of each month, he holds a 
service at the State Farm from 9 to 10 a. m., visits pa- 
tients in the hospital there until 11, returns to the peni- 
tentiary at 11:45 a. m. to superivse three students from 
Union Theological Seminary who are doing field work 
there as a part of their ministerial training. 

After lunch, Chaplain Frazer and one of the stu- 
dents from the seminary drive to the Peaks Industrial 
School for worship service at 2:30 p. m. and from there 
to the Hanover Industrial School for 4 p. m. services. 

On the first Friday of each month, Chaplain Frazer 
visits the Blue Ridge Sanitorium for tubercular patients 
at Charlottesville. He spends the entire day going from 
bed to bed, answering questions and noting letters that 
should be written. 

Similar programs go on at the Lynchburg State 
Colony and the State Industrial Farm. The chaplain 
praised the youth program at Peaks Industrial School 
and the work of the Rev. George Ossman, who visits 
the ill at the Medical College of Virginia Hospital. The 
writer accompanies Mr. Frazer to the State Farm for 
Women on first Sunday afternoons for preaching en- 
gagements. 

On the third Friday, Chaplain Frazer, goes to the 
Piedmont Sanatorium for tubercular patients at Burke- 
ville. At this institution, he also provides a program of 
moving pictures in the evening. 

Miss Erma J. Barker, secretary to Mr. Frazer, pro- 
ocking project for the inmates of 
n September, she buys bolts of ma- 
to various groups who make it into 
is work is done by the Women's 
's Episcopal Church and by the 
'dustrial Farm for Women, 
'stributed to various Sunday school 
ies and individuals who fill them 
A boy will receive a cake of soap, 
uts, games, tooth paste, tooth brush, 
comb. Similar items are included for 
This past Christmas 2,278 stockings 

iplain Frazer is trying to find suitable 
>r an experienced bookkeeper who has 
for embezzlement. The man is not 
o do common labor and the chaplain. 



January 20, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Five. 



believes that he desires to earn an 
honest living'. 

The Foundation came into being 
twenty-eight years ago when a bill 
was introduced in the State Legis- 
lature to provide a salary for a chap- 
lain at the penitentiary. 

Church leaders insisted that relig- 
ious work in State institutions is a 
missionary opportunity of the church 
and not a function of the State, and 
a number of denominations banded 
together to support the program for 
the State Penitentiary. Gradually 
the program has been expanded to 
include other institutions. 



EX - MODERATOR SPEAKS. 

A special meeting of the General 
Council has been called for February 
4, in accordance with the vote at Ober- 
lin. Since I was your moderator at 
Oberlin, I wonder if you may not be 
interested in knowing my present ma- 
ture convictions about the merger ? I 
have followed carefully the whole de- 
velopment of events since the merger 
was first proposed, and have tried at 
all times to be objective, impersonal 
and kindly disposed towards all con- 
cerned, both ' ' pro ' ' and ' ' anti. ' ' 

First of all, it seems to me that the 
basic question is this: Are we really 
ecumenically minded? Do we really 
want closer Christian unity with all 
Protestants — so far as that can be 
achieved without surrender of essen- 
tial liberties? Personally, I am 
thrilled by the vision of the increasing 
solidarity of all Protestantism. And 
I think that our desperate world sit- 
uation makes its consummation of 
paramount importance. 

I believe the next step toward this 
unity can come right now by follow- 
ing William E. Barton's common- 
sense advice : ' ' Let those unite that 
can unite ! ' ' Now we can unite with 
the E. & R. because they are willing 
to accept a common basis of local 
church autonomy, freedom from 
creedal subscription, and a voluntary 
delegated denominational organiza- 
tion — practically equivalent to what 
we have now. Union with them would 
create a great liberal evangelical de- 
nomination, nearly two million strong, 
which could exert tremendous influ- 
ence for democratic church govern- 
ment, progressive religious thought, 
and a free pulpit in all the rest of 
Protestantism. This appears to me to 
be the major strategy on which we 
should all agree. This new united 
church would also have the advantage 
of being more representative geo- 
graphically — as strong in Pennsyl- 
vania as in New England, while in 



the middle west the two groups would 
admirably supplement and strength- 
en one another. , 

I think, moreover, that our E. & R. 
friends have an educational tradition 
and a vigor, as well as freedom of 
thought, which makes them akin to 
us, to say nothing of a warmth of 
spiritual devotion which might come 
to us as an uncovenanted but welcome 
blessing from the union. A great 
wind of spiritual renewal might sweep 
across our churches as a result of this 
stimulating sense of closer fellowship 
with 700,000 new-found brothers and 
sisters in the faith. 

On the other hand, to fail to achieve 
this union, after we have gone thus 
far, and to fail on what seem to me to 
be rather vague and undeflnable 
grounds, cannot help but impart a 
chill of negativism and defeatism, not 
only to us but to the whole ecumeni- 
cal movement. 

Therefore, I am strongly for the 
union. I would not be so if it in- 
volved surrender of local church lib- 
erty or of our cherished theological 
freedom. But all these things have 
been carefully safe-guarded in the 
Basis of Union, plus the Oberlin In- 
terpretation, plus the Cleveland Joint 
Declaration. I believe the approxi- 
mately 1,000 to 12 vote at Oberlin did 
reveal the hearts of our people. We 
cannot now turn back (and we must 
not frustrate) the great flood-tide of 
ecumenical longings and convictions 
in our fellowship, especially among 
our young people. 

I hope and trust that our highly 
intelligent and deeply Christian mi- 
nority leaders (whose sincerity is not 
to be questioned) will now cease their 
opposition, since so much has been 
done to allay their fears. I certainly 
do not expect any large number of 
churches now to create a schism and 
organize a separate denomination on 
a basis of disagreement which has fi- 
nally simmered down to differences 
largely procedural and relatively 
slight, after the clarifications and ad- 
justments made at Oberlin in June 
and at Cleveland in November. 

Albert W. Palmer. 



TENTH ANNUAL INSTITUTE OF 
RELIGION. 

Raleigh's annual Institute of Re- 
ligion will observe its tenth anniver- 
sary in 1949. The result of the vision 
of the Rev. Allyn P. Robinson, and 
several devoted laymen who initiated 
it ten years ago, it has grown in popu- 
lar appeal each year in the State 
Capital and has been able to command 
outstanding speakers in a wide va- 



riety of fields. This year's program 
is scheduled to begin on January 24, 
with an address by Dr. Henry Steele 
Commager, Professor of History in 
Columbia University, whose subject 
is: "Safeguarding Civil Liberties — 
Why and How?" 

Other speakers and their subjects 
are : 

January 31 — Dr. Harold E. Fey, 
Managing Editor of The 'Christian 
Century., whose topic is: "A World 
Church in a World Crisis. ' ' 

February 7 — The Honorable Estes 
Kef auver, United States Senator from 
Tennessee, who will speak on : " The 
Recuperating South. ' ' 

February 14 : Dr. Reinhold Nie- 
buhr, William E. Dodge, Jr., Profes- 
sor of Applied Christianity, Union 
Theological Seminary, New York, who 
has as his subject: "The Spiritual 
and Political Dimension of the World 
Crisis." 

February 21 — Dr. Carl Hermann 
Voss, Executive Secreta,ry of the 
World Alliance for International 
Friendship Through the Churches, 
and Chairman of the American Chris- 
tian Palestine Committee. Dr. Voss, 
pastor of the United Church from 
1935 to 1938, will sj>eak on the sub- 
ject: "A Christian Looks at the 
New Israel." 

March 1 — Madame Rajan Nehru, of 
India, whose husband is a nephew of 
Prime Minister Jawaharal Nehru, and 
the present Indian Minister to Swed- 
en. Madame Nehru's subject is: 
"What is Happening in India." 

The theme of the Tenth Institute is : 
"The Church and a World in Crisis." 

Four courses will be offered in the 
following fields: "Current Trends 
in Christian Thought," led by Dr. 
Ralph E. McLain, Head of the De- 
partment of Eeligion, Meredith Col- 
lege, Raleigh, N. C. "Science and 
Religion," with Dr. C. G. Brennecke, 
Head of the Department of Electrical 
Engineering, and Dr. George A. Gul- 
lette, Head of the Social Studies De- 
partment, both at State College. "Psy- 
chology in Everyday Use," led by 
Dr. D. J. Moffie, Head of the Depart- 
ment of Psychology at State College. 
"Problems of a World in Turmoil," 
(International Relations), led by Mrs. 
Charlotte Hilton Green, Chairman of 
the Department of Civics and Inter- 
national Relations of the Raleigh Wo- 
man's Club. 

The Institute schedule on the above 
dotes will be : 6 :00 p. m. — Fellow- 
ship Dinners (reservations should be 
made at the church); 7:00 p. m.— 
Classes; and 8:00 p. m.— Featured 
speakers. 



Page Six. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 20, 1949. 



r—————— 



CONTRIBUTIONS 



SUFFOLK LETTER. 

We were about to receive a young- 
father and mother into church upon 
the transfer of their memberships 
from churches outside our city. Some- 
thing of the following is what I said : 
We are about to receive two new mem- 
bers into our church, let us consider 
for a few minutes what that should 
mean. We are agreed on the facts of 
the Christian faith, that back of this 
universe there is God, that we our- 
selves are in need of God, that God 
has revealed himself as Father 
through Christ, and that he has 
brought us redemption through him. 
Let us be assured and that the 
Church is made up of his followers, 
that they are banded together under 
the compulsion to carry out his com- 
mand to serve others, and to love one 
another. 

Let us notice that it means that we 
shall enter into a serious and bind- 
ing covenant with God and one an- 
other, a covenant that we are to be 
in fellowship with one another and 
witnesses by our lives to the Christ at 
home and wherever we work, that ours 
in so far as we are able to make it so 
is to be a Christian home and that we 
are to take the Sunday school, the 
teachings thereof, and attendance up- 
on divine worship seriously ; and that 
we take upon ourselves the obligation 
by the very fact of our uniting with 
the church to attend its services, to 
attend them meanfully, consistently, 
regularly, and with real concern for 
our worship and praise of God, and 
the part we may have in the building 
up of his Kingdom. Let us never at 
any time while we are members of the 
Church feel that we can take that 
membership lightly, or its obligations 
in any other way than as divine and 
serious. 

It means that we shall support the 
Church in attendance, in loyal de- 
votion in word and deed, and with the 
first fruits of our earnings and in 
God's gifts to us; and that we shall 
rejoice in the privilege of making ex- 
tra gifts when there is extra need and 
when we are able so to give. 

For all this we may expect from 
our Church in Christ the grace of 
God, the greatest gift beneath the 
shining stars, with salvation and life 
abundant and eternal; and for this 
covenant and membership you may 
also expect of your Church the prac- 



tical ministries which it has to offer, 
such as this lovely, warm sanctuary, 
the equipment which our fellowship 
together has provided, like Sunday 
school rooms, chapels, recreation and 
dining facilities, music, textbooks, Bi- 
bles, friendship and encouragement, a 
minister for times of need anywhere 
night or day as near as your tele- 
phone. Having the interest of your 
Church at heart, and feeling that it is 
yours you will be patient with any 
imperfections, and render it your 
prayers and faithful cooperation. 

We want you, need you, and you 
need what the Church through Christ 
has to offer, but already there are 
more than fifteen hundred names on 
the roll; strive to help us be a bet- 
ter church, and add to its influence 
and good name in the community and 
in the Kingdom of God, and may God 
give you great joy and happiness as 
you become a part of this Church and 
through it of the faithful throughout 
the wide world. 

At the close of the service another 
couple waited at the door and told me 
they wanted to unite with the Church 
on the following Sunday. 

John G. Truitt. 



A LETTER TO THE LAYMEN. 

P. 0. Box 411, 
Burlington, N. C, 
January 7, 1949. 

To the Congregational Christian 

Laymen of North 'Carolina — 
Dear Fellow Laymen ■ 

Our Laymen and Pastors of North 
Carolina (E. N. C, W. N. C, N. C. & 
Va.) will meet at Elon College Sun- 
day, January 23, 1949, at 3 :00 p. m. 
and concluding with a banquet at 
6 :00 o 'clock. Please tell the men of 
your church and Sunday school about 
this meeting which has promise of be- 
ing one of the most significant meet- 
ings ever held by our church. Evan- 
gelism, Stewardship, and the work of 
the Layman in the modern church will 
be the emphasis. 

The program will include three 
great speakers and leaders of national 
and international reputation — Dr. 
Howell D. Davies, a Congregational 
Christian minister and secretary of 
Chicago, 111., a specialist in Steward- 
ship and modern Churchmanship ; 
Dr. Allan S. Meek, Evangelical and 
Eef ormed minister for thirty - two 



years, churchman, and president of 
the Lancaster Theological Seminary, 
Penna. ; Dr. Rockwell Harmon Pot- 
ter, Hartford, Conn., former Modera- 
tor of the General Council of Congre- 
gational Christian Churches, minister 
and teacher, a fascinating speaker 
with a great message for our day. 

Program. 

3 :00 Registration. 

Devotional Service. 
3 :30 Address and Discussion — Dr. 
Howell D. Davies. Subject: 
"Making and Spending Mon- 
ey — Tested by the Christian 
Gospel." 

4 :30 Address and Discussion — Dr. 

Allen ,S. Meek. Subject: 
"The Layman as a Christian 
_ . . . Witness. ' ' 
6 :00 Banquet. 

Speaker — Dr. Rockwell Harmon 
Potter. 

The price of the banquet will be 
$1.50 per plate. It is absolutely nec- 
essary that we know the number of 
plates to reserve. Please report to 
your pastor the number of men who 
will attend from your church, or write 
direct to Wm. T. Scott, Supt., Elon 
College, N. C. We need to know the 
number not later than Wednesday. 
January 19. Give us the names of 
those who will attend if possible. 

An unusual opportunity makes pos- 
sible the meeting on the 23rd. The 
Christian Workers' Conference being 
held at Elon College January 23-27 
makes it possible for us to have these 
unusual speakers. Plan now to be 
present for the meeting on Sunday, 
January 23. Tell other men from 
your church. Have a good delegation 
- present. Don't forget to get your res- 
ervations in for the banquet. 

Yours sincerely, 
George D. Colclough, 

Chairman. 



SEVENTY -FIFTH ANNIVERSARY 
TO BE OBSERVED. 

Protestant Churches of Puerto Ri- 
co will observe the seventy-fifth anni- 
versary of the founding of Protestant 
Missions in that island during the 
week of March 6-13. Dr. J. P. Bar- 
rett, who with his wife, represented 
the Christian Church for more than 
twenty -five years in the island, has 
been asked to represent our church 
at this celebration. There will, of 
course, be some expenses entailed in 
the matter, and contributions will be 
solicited. Further announcement will 
be made by Dr. H. S. Hardcastle, the 
chairman of the special committee in 
the near future. 



January 20, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Seven. 



News of Elon College 



By President L. E. Smith 



CHRISTIAN LIVING. 

in. IN THE CHURCH. 

The Church is divine. It was con- 
ceived in the heart of God and given 
to man by His son, Jesus Christ, our 
Lord. In the days of His flesh He 
asked many questions, many concern- 
ing others and some concerning Him- 
self. On one occasion he inquired of 
His disciples, "Whom do men say 
that I, the Son of Man, am?" They 
answered, "Some say that Thou art 
John the Baptist, some Elias, and 
others Jeremiah, or one of the proph- 
ets." Then he inquired, "But whom 
do ye say that I am?" Peter an- 
swered and said, ' ' Thou art the Christ 
the Son of the living God." Jesus 
answered, "Blessed art thou, Simon, 
for flesh and blood hath not revealed 
this unto you but my Father which 
art in Heaven. And I say unto you 
that thou art Peter and upon this 
rock I will build my church and the 
gates of hell shall not prevail against 
it." That, which believes that Jesus 
is the Christ, the Son of God and 
confesses Him as such to the world 
constitutes the basis upon which His 
church is built. The flood gates of 
hell may be opened wide from within 
and without and all the forces of evil 
hurled against it and still the church 
will stand. It is founded upon the 
rock, Jesus Christ. It is the pillar 
and ground of truth, the hope and ex- 
pectation of all who are within its 
love. 

What does Christian living within 
the church mean? Are you a mem- 
ber of the church ? How do you live ? 
Are those who are outside of the 
church impressed with the way you 
live? Are your habits, customs, and 
practices such as to convince the non- 
church members of your community 
and acquaintance that the church is 
of God and that those who are in the 
church are different to those who are 
without, that something has happened 
in your life which they have not yet 
experienced? Does the light of truth 
shine through you brightening the 
pathway of others, making plain the 
way of life, or do you in your living 
raise questions, cast shadows, and 
blur the way of life for others and 
cause them to turn from the church 
and from Christ? It is a glorious 
privilege to be in the church but a 



fearful award awaits those who are 
still of the world and yet in the 
church. 

To prove ourselves worthy of the 
church we should acknowledge Christ 
as its head and as our personal Sav- 
iour and dedicate ourselves daily to 
the services of Christ and His church. 
Here are some things that we might 
do to prove ourselves Christians and 
be of service to those who know us 
and observe our way of living. 

1. Guard our speech — James said 
the tongue is an unruly evil. Make 
sure that we do not injure others by 
careless and loose talk. When we do 
we injure ourselves and make fresh 
the wounds of Christ. Speech is giv- 
en man to bless and not to curse. 

2. Be kind and generous in your 
deeds. In living, the seeds for etern- 
ity are sown. They will spring up 
and come to fruitage in this and an- 
other world. Make sure that they 
are good and not evil. The Lord of 
the harvest will neither err nor sleep. 

3. Be thoughtful and considerate 
of others. There are many who are 
unfortunate. They need your assis- 
tance. Those who are tempted need 
strength. Those who sorrow need 
comfort. Those who hunger need 
bread. Those who are lonely need 
companionship. Those who are sinful 
need a Savior. Remember that inas- 
much as ye serve the least of these ye 
shall serve Christ. 

4. Be true and faithful — true to 
the vows that you gave when you 
sought membership in the church, and 
faithful to every duty and obligation 
that are yours as a member of the 
church, the body of Christ. 



APPORTIONMENT GIVING. 

Buildings, equipment, faculty, and 
students are required for the conduct 
of a college. Money is required to 
erect buildings and equip them for in- 
struction at the college level. Teach- 
ers who have spent weeks, months, 
and years in preparation for effective 
teaching must be paid for their serv- 
ices as anyone else. They have the 
usual bills to pay. Money for capital 
improvement is required but money 
for current needs is also necessary. 

Our Southern Convention has 
sought to assist the college in its cur- 
rent obligations by apportioning defi- 



nite amounts to the churches of our 
Convention for the college. The Con- 
vention is a delegated body. Every 
local church has a right to be repre- 
sented in the Convention and a voice 
in its actions. Each church in the 
Convention has an obligation to sup- 
port the institutions and enterprises 
of the church. Elon College is one of 
our Convention's principal institu- 
tions. As a rule, our local churches 
are willing to give the college fi- 
nancial support and take advantage 
of the opportunity monthly to make 
a contribution. By cooperation and 
generous giving the churches do help 
materially in the support of the col-, 
lege. The college is most grateful. 
Previously reported $ 200.00 

Eastern Va. Conference : 

Holland 100.00 

Norfolk, Second 21.00 

N. C. & Va. Conference: 
Durham S. S 22.03 

Va. Valley Conference: 
Mt. Olivet G) S. S 5.37 

Total $ 148.40 

Grand total $ 348.40 



Dr. J. H. Dollar of Elon College 
occupied his former pulpit in New- 
port News on Sunday morning, Jan- 
uary 9. The choir of the Rosemont 
Church presented a Festival of Music 
in the Newport News Church at the 
Vesper Service. 



Mr. Layman — Send your pastor to 
the Christian Workers' Conference 
next week ! 



THE PILGRIM PRESS DAYTON 
STORE CLOSES FEBRUARY 1. 

Formal action was taken recently 
to close the Dayton store February 1, 
1949. The decision was made after 
careful study and deliberation. In- 
creased overhead costs, mailing and 
transportation problems, combined to 
make it seem wise to take this im- 
portant step now. 

By far the greater part of the Day- 
ton business has been through the 
mail, and it has become increasingly 
evident that the constituency could be 
served better through our Boston and 
Chicago stores with their larger in- 
ventories and more direct transpor- 
tation facilities. Through the years 
the Dayton store has been fortunate 
in its leadership. Under the new ar- 
rangement, the Boston and Chicago 
stores are prepared to serve Dayton 
customers in the same cooperating 
spirit demonstrated by Mr. Tom Rad- 
abaugh, Miss Betty Mack and their 
associates. 



Page Eight THE CHRISTIAN SUN 




A LETTER FROM THE JACKSONS. 

American Board Mission, 
Shaowu, Fukien, China, 
December 29, 1948. 

Dear Friends: 

By the flickering Chinese oil lamp, 
I Ve been reading the Missionary Her- 
ald, November issue. It transported 
me back to America and our church 
life. I was getting all enthusiastic 
over the Every Member Canvass and 
the Pilgrim Fellowship, and wonder- 
ing if the Waverly women would have 
an Unseen Guest Meal. Then the clock, 
left here by the Storrs, struck its 
cheery ' ' cuckoo. ' ' Shivering with the 
chill of a Shaowu winter night, I 
came back to reality. But not with- 
out inspiration caught from the plans 
you American churches are carrying 
out for the World Mission. 

Your letters have been an inspira- 
tion to us, too; and, of course, The 
Christian Sun. A friend in New 
Hampshire sent a snapshot of herself 
and family. I saw Winnie Whitlock 
of Winchester smiling in a snapshot 
she'd sent a Chinese friend. Pictures 
do help reduce those thousands of 
miles that separate us; and for those 
of you whom we know only by letter, 
they make your signature come alive. 

And speaking of pictures, did you 
see Ed and Fran in that Herald? 
They meant Shaowu, China, not In- 
dia, of course. And Mary Dewar 
playing that Chinese "violin"? She 
was leading a busy, though rugged, 
life there in Communist territory, the 
last we heard. How privileged I feel to 
be one of such company as the Moul- 
tons, Bert Faurot, and Roderick Scott 
also pictured in that Herald. When 
I recall four years ago this time filling 
out all those papers the Board re- 
quires to investigate a prospecting 
missionary, I can hardly believe we 
really did leave our Waverly church 
to be foreign missionaries. But now 
I look up at the huge scroll of tigers 
hanging on our wall and remember 
our present church and responsibility. 
The picture was given us by South 
Gate Church. And there on the baby's 
play blanket is a doll made and sent 
by Mrs. Holland of Franklin to her 



missionary's firstborn. For that mat- 
ter I need only to feel the warmth of 
certain clothing the Waverly women 
gave me at parting and I remember 
we have left the American pastorate 
with its comforts (and problems!) to 
be your pastor on the foreign field 
with its peculiar discomforts and 
problems. Your prayers and letters 
and checks sent to the Board give us 
that feeling of support we need so 
sorely when overcome by that feeling 
of helplessness which comes to one 
minister in this huge area. 

Dick is gone now on a "quick" 
(three days by boat) trip to Yang- 
kow, a trip which should have been 
made in the pleasant weather of fall. 
But our radio news (Voice of Amer- 
ica) made us feel something drastic 
was about to happen any day, and we 
didn't want to separate for fear evac- 
uation might be necessary. Now we 're 
getting accustomed to that "state of 
emergency" feeling most China mis- 
sionaries have experienced off and on 
during their service here ; and we 're 
continuing our work as usual. Local- 
ly, nothing more unusual is happening 
than the regular inflationary rise of 
prices and the New Year 's increase of 
goods for sale. 

Yes, another China New Year is ap- 
proaching. This year the swell in 
market crowds came in time to give 
me a faint reminder of Christmas 
shoppers at home. But there was 
none of the light and music ; nor was 
there the harried hustling. Noise 
and shoving there was, though. The 
leaders of a heavily laden donkey 
shouting a way through the crowds 
made a touch of Bethlehem on De- 
cember 24. The well on East Gate 
Street is like the one in my creche at 
home ; and East Gate crowds seem 
just as ignorant of Christmas as those 
Bethlehem crowds must have been. 
Our own church members make us 
wonder sometimes how much of 
Christmas has actually reached Shao- 
wu. Of course, it is difficult for us 
foreigners to even know what goes on, 
much less understand it. But hap- 
penings in supposedly Christian fami- 
lies or business life and within the 



January 20, 1949. 

church itself have given us more than fj 
one heartache. 

Just as Christians at home need God 
to touch their businesses and pocket- 
books, so do they here, only more so. 
Just as Christians at home need hu- 
mility and concern for others, so do 
they here, only more so. As Leona 
said in her talk to the Synod, ' ' Shao- 
wu has suffered spiritually and mor- 
ally from the wars." To meet Shao- 
wu 's needs requires more spiritual 
power than just we five have. We 
need to feel the strength of the world 
mission and to know you Christians in 
America are back of that World 
Mission. 

As the World Day of Prayer ap- 
proaches, may we all grow in spirit, 
stretch our minds to understand the 
failings and hardships of the Chris- 
tian minority in every country. Then 
may we try to see ourselves, Ameri- 
cans, as we must look to them. And 
pray God for His viewpoint of us all, 
and His plan. 

Affectionately yours, 

Dorothy Jackson. 



DESTINATION : PUERTO RICO. 

Leaving his young doctor wife to 
complete her internship, Rev. Howard 
E. Spragg of Chicago, 111., with his 
children, Suzy, five and Peter, one 
year old, and his sister, Miss Con- 
stance Spragg of Waverly, Mass., 
flew from La Guardia Airfield, New 
York. Tuesday night, January 4, 
bound for San Juan, Puerto Rico. Mr. 
Spragg will become superintendent of 
all work in Puerto Rico conducted by 
The Board of Home Missions of the 
Congregational Christian Churches. 

Mrs. Spragg, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. B. S. Beach of Westfield, New 
Jersey, received her MD from the Uni- 
versity of Chicago last June and will 
complete her internship at Woodlawn 
Hospital, Chicago, this coming June, 
after which time she will join her 
family in Pureto Rico. Mr. Spragg, 
who was born in Boston, Mass., is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Spragg of 
55 Ashland Street, Maiden, Mass. He 
is a graduate of Union Theological 
Seminary, New York City, and holds 
his BD from Chicago Theological Sem- 
inary. 

In Puerto Rico Mr. Spragg will 
succeed Rev. Charles I. Mohler who is 
retiring after forty years of service 
there. He will be Director of all Con- 
gregational Christian work on the Is- 
land which consists of twenty-two or- 
ganized churches, forty-four rural 
chapels, the Ryder Hospital and the 
(Continued on page 10.) 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Nine. 



Church Women at Work 

With Emphasis on Missions 

Mrs. W. J. Andes, Editor 
637 S. Sunset Drive, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



BURLINGTON AUXILIARY. 

The Burlington Auxiliary publishes 
a news bulletin every month, con- 
taining information about what the 
women are doing. The auxiliary 
meets on this plan : 

Circles meet at 10 :30 a. m. 

General Meeting at 11 :30 a. m. 

Fellowship Luncheon at 12 :30 p. m. 

The pastor is conducting the Bible 
Study on Monday ofternoons at 5 :30 
at the church. 

The Auxiliary is also responsible 
for the church nursery, each circle 
taking its turn at being in charge for 
a month. 



ROWLAND MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
DEDICATED. 

For several years our Auxiliary in 
the Greensboro, First Church, has had 
a "Christmas Party," at which time 
we combined December circle meet- 
ings and an inspirational meeting in 
one evening of fellowship. It is al- 
ways one of the highlights in our 
year's work, and this year, we feel 
that it was one of the highlights in 
the entire work of not only the aux- 
iliary, but the church as a whole. 

Two years ago at our Christmas 
party, we launched the Rowland Me- 
morial Fund, in memory of Mrs. C. 
H. Rowland. The fund was desig- 
nated for a church library. This year 
we saw the dream become a reality in 
the dedication of the Rowland Me- 
morial Library and its presentation 
by the auxiliary to the church. 

A room in the church basement had 
been most pleasingly decorated and 
equipped as a library. Accumulated 
funds had been spent in the purchase 
of books and they had been placed on 
the new shelves as the beginning of 
a growing library. An effective pro- 
gram had been planned and was beau- 
tifully executed. The program was 
built around the theme of "Opening 
Windows" and the idea was expressed 
by four women who spoke briefly on 
how our library would open the win- 
dows of reading for children, young 
people, church leadership and spirit- 
ual living. The library was presented 
to the church and accepted by our 
minister. After the program, Mrs. 
Rowland's daughters received the 
church members in the new library. 



It was a joyous, yet deeply moving 
occasion. A hard-working and capa- 
ble committee had a beautifully deco- 
rated the entire church basement. The 
atmosphere of Christmas decorations, 
candle-lit rooms, well-spoken words 
and heart-filling music intensified our 
memory of one who touched our lives 
so effectively. In her memory, we 
will strive to make our library such 
a vital force in our church that we 
know she would approve. 

Mrs. Russell V. Powell. 



Be sure to order materials for 
World Day of Prayer early. 



RACIALISM RAMPANT IN 
SOUTH AFRICA. 

In the October issue of Time maga- 
zine appeared a startling article on 
South Africa. It described the new 
Nationalist government under Prime 
Minister Daniel Malan, which is 
founded on the principle of racial seg- 
regation or "apartheid." 

Two anti-Semitic ultranationalist 
organizations which had been forbid- 
den under Field Marshall Smuts' re- 
gime are now in power. One, the 
Afrikaner Broederbond, "the sinister 
secret society controls a good two- 
thirds of the government members of 
Parliament," says Time. 

Reference was also made to the re- 
stricting of immigration and the tight- 
ening up of requirements for citizen- 
ship. Prime Minister Malan has an- 
nounced that he will put out of the 
Parliament representatives of the Ne- 
groes and will take away the franchise 
of the Coloureds (mixed white) in the 
Cape Province. 

This article was so startling in 
spots that it was referred to Dr. Jas. 
Dexter Taylor, who has lived for near- 
ly 49 years in the very heart of the 
Union of South Africa, and has only 
recently returned to the United 
States. 

The following are some of his com- 
ments : 

"The National party won the elec- 
tion on the issue of "apartheid," 
which was almost the only and cer- 
tainly the main plank in their plat- 
form. They maintain that segrega- 
tion is the only policy that will save 
"white civilization" in South Afri- 



ca, by which they mean that it is the 
only means of keeping the white race 
dominant in all respects. In their 
campaign speeches, in order to soft- 
pedal their aims somewhat for the 
ears of the less extreme sections of the 
population, and to win some British 
support (which they did) that is 
English - speaking sec ti o n s, they 
claimed that apartheid did not mean 
oppression of the non-Europeans, but 
meant allowing them to develop to the 
full extent in their own segregated 
areas, but in the practical steps al- 
ready announced in parliament it is 
clear that they mean to deprive non- 
Europeans of every vestige of politi- 
cal representation and to re-orient all 
education and administration of these 
people toward providing cheap farm 
labor. 

"It is true that the Broederbond 
is a secret organization, claiming to be 
cultural but sponsoring an ideology 
differing but little from Nazism, ex- 
cept that it claims its basis in Cal- 
vanism. There is no doubt that its ul- 
timate policy and that of the Nation- 
alist party is to set up a "republic" 
which would be severed from the 
British Commonwealth and would be 
run on a one-party system with the 
franchise confined to those who have 
the Herrenvolk outlook, with the Af- 
rikaan's language dominant if not ul- 
timately the only one officially recog- 
nized. 

"All this was put in plain words 
during the early part of the last war 
when they believed that Hitler was 
winning and that he would encour- 
age and support the setting up of such 
a republic. Those aspects of policy 
have been soft-pedalled during the 
campaign but never repudiated. All 
liberals in South Africa are agreed 
in the fear that present trends in the 
new government indicate that democ- 
racy is very seriously threatened in 
South Africa, and not non-European 
interests only. 

"The new government is setting 
out to cancel all political rights of 
Natives, Coloureds and Indians. Even 
though such rights as they had were 
entrenched in the Constitution adopt- 
ed at the time of Union of the four 
Provinces, and according to that con- 
stitution could not be altered except 
by a two-thirds majority of both 
houses of parliament sitting together 
the government has announced its in- 
tention to cancel those rights by a 
simple majority vote of the house of 
Assembly. 

"It is true that Malan proposes to 
abolish the representation in Parlia- 
Continued on page 10.) 



Page Ten. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 20, 1949. 



Book Reviews 



The Fabulous "Dutch" Zellers. 
Raymond J. Jeffreys. 

This new book, written by the au- 
thor of God Is My Landlord, literally 
drags the liquor business out into the 
open and rips off its mask of re- 
spectability, and exposes it for the 
benefit of the young people who are 
"falling" for the wet propaganda. 
It is so "hot" that some publishers 
were afraid to touch it. 

It is the thrilling, true life-story of 
a daring gangster and notorious boot- 
legger who spread terror up and down 
the Ohio Valley in the "Gay Nine- 
ties." Then a miracle happened . . . 
he "hit the sawdust trail" in a Billy 
Sunday tabernacle meeting and be- 
came a sensational crusader for Tem- 
perance. 

The new book will be off the press 
soon. Watch for advertising an- 
nouncement in this paper. 

* # • * 

The Snowden Douglass Sunday 
School Lessons. Earl L. Douglass. 
Macmillan. New York. $2. 

It is not too late to get this practical 
exposition of the International Sun- 
day School Lessons, The first two 
quarters deal with the Life of Christ. 
The Third Quarter with the Psalms of 
of Ancient Israel and the Fourth with 
the prophets Isaiah and Jeremiah. 
The teachings of each lesson are em- 
phasized skilfully, using various types 
of print as well as by striking illus- 
trations and quotations. Why not se- 
cure this publication now for your 
teacher? 

# • • * 

Report to Protestants. Marcus 
Bach. Bob-Merrill Company. $3. 

This is a book that is definitely dif- 
ferent, It is unique in its approach 
to the problem which Protestantism 
faces, and in its presentation of data. 
The author is exceptionally well qual- 
ified to make his "Report" to Protes- 
tants both by reason of his personal 
religious background, his training, 
and his experience in religious work. 
He writes with conviction and with 
forceful diction. His style is in- 
triguing — his thought stimulating*. 
His analysis of the strength as well 
as of the weakness of Protestantism ; 
his fair consideration of the position 
of Romanism, of the Christian Science 
Movement and of the numerous mod- 
ern cults; and his presentation of the 
true basis of ecumenicity make this 



book one of the really great books of 
the year. It is "a must book" for all 
Protestant ministers, and for Protes- 
tant laymen who occupy positions of 
leadership in Protestantism. 

Roy C. Helpenstein, 
Mason City, Iowa. 

^ ^ 

Protestantism Faces Its Educa- 
tional Task Together. Dr. Wil- 
liam C. Bower and Dr. Percy R. 
Howard. 

The story of cooperative Christian 
education in the United States and 
Canada, as told by the authors, will be 
published February 7. 

This 228-page book, which recounts 
the important developments in inter- 
denominational religious education 
during the last quarter of a century 
will be released at the twenty-seventh 
annual meeting of the International 
Council of Religious Education at Co- 
lumbus, Ohio, February 6-12. 

Separate chapters relate how Prot- 
estant forces have cooperated in cur- 
riculum development, children's and 
young people's work, adult work and 
family life, leadership education, va- 
cation and week-day religious educa- 
tion, field work and conventions, re- 
search, public relations, meeting war 
and post-war needs, and in sponsor- 
ing the Revised Standard Version of 
the Bible. 

Copies may be ordered from the In- 
ternational Council of Religious Edu- 
cation, 203 North Wabash Avenue, 
Chicago 1, 111., for $3.25. 



PEN PORTRAITS OF THE DISCIPLES 
OF CHRIST. 

II. ANDREW. 

By Samuel Lawrence Johnson, 
Pastor, Park Manor Church, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

The name Andrew in Greek signi- 
fies "manly." He was the brother of 
Peter. However, whereas there are 
numerous references to Peter in the 
four gospels and in the Acts the only 
references to Andrew appear in Mat- 
thew 10 :2, John 6 :8, 10 :22, Mark 13 : 
3 and generally the traditions con- 
cerning him are unreliable. Yet, it is 
comparatively certain that he was the 
one who introduced Peter to the Mas- 
ter and would be important in our 
eyes if he had done nothing more. 
It is also thought that he was instru- 
mental in the call of Philip. 

Andrew was a man of keen obser- 
vation and when Jesus asked (John 6) 
"Whence shall we buv bread ?" it was 
Andrew who volunteered the infor- 
mation about the lad with the loaves 
and fishes. 



Tradition indicates Andrew as the 
hero of several romantic adventures. 
He was, for example, supposed to have 
been sent by Jesus to rescue Matthew 
who was a captive in the land of An- 
thropohagie. He assumed the disguise 
of a sailor; was tortured by savages 
but saved Matthew. 

This brother of Peter may have car- 
ried on an intensive preaching min- 
istry in the lands surrounding By- 
zantium and Thrace. Legend has it 
that he was crucified at Patrae because 
for some reason, by his preaching, he 
had induced the pro-consul's wife to 
leave her husband. 

It is thought that he did some writ- 
ing but no trace of it has ever been 
found. 



RACIALISM IN SOUTH AFRICA. 

Continued from page 9.) 
ment of the Natives who now elect 
European Senators, four to represent 
the whole 8,000,000 Africans and two 
M. P. 's to represent two constituencies 
in the Cape where Natives had the 
vote before Union. He also has an- 
nounced that he will abolish the Na- 
tive Affairs Commission, a statutory 
body established to advise the Secre- 
tary and Minister for Native Affairs, 
of which Senator Dr. Brookes is a 
member. The Native Representative 
Council, a purely advisory body of 
Natives elected by a special form of 
franchise, to consider proposed legis- 
lation especially affecting Natives is 
also booked for abolition. 

"Attempts are already being made 
to rally liberal forces to the defense 
of the rights of the non-European ma- 
jority from these hostile attacks of the 
dominant white majority, and to rally 
all lovers of democracy to the defense 
of the only principles on which de- 
mocracy can possibly exist. These are 
truly critical and dangerous days for 
South Africa. ' ' 



DESTINATION: PUERTO RICO. 

(Continued from page 8.) 
Yuquiyu Rural Life Community Cen- 
ter at Luquillo, a Christian coopera- 
tive community. 

"Until recently the average conti- 
nental American wasn't quite sure 
whether Puerto Rico was in the South 
Pacific or off the coast of Spain and he 
was even more vague about the char- 
acter and political status of the is- 
land," says Mr. Spragg. "Now that 
thousands of Puerto Ricans are com- 
ing to the mainland each month, a 
great deal of attention is being given 
to this child of the Caribbean. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Eleven. 



Youth at Work in the Church 

Ann Teuitt, Editor; Helen Jackson, C. B. Twiddy, Assoiates. 



YOUTH WEEK! AN" OPPORTUNITY 
FOR UNITED YOUTH ACTION- 

By Dr. Isaac K. Beckes.* 

Youth Week, January 30 to Feb- 
ruary 6, 1949, offers unlimited oppor- 
tunity for Christian youth through 
united action to make a real impact 
upon community life. It gives young 
people of all denominations and re- 
lated agencies an opportunity to unite 
in offering one hard and one common 
purpose in His Name. The 1949 
theme is "Let God Speak." 

Your Pilgrim Fellowship can take 
the lead in providing an effective 
Youth Week celebration in your own 
community. Guidance materials may 
be had through the United Christian 
Youth Movement office, 203 North 
Wabash Avenue, Chicago 1, Illinois, 
or our own denominational offices. 
Here is an outline of what can be 
included in the Youth Week program 
in your community. 

Sunday, January 30 — Local Church 
Day. 

"Let God Speak Through Me" is 
the theme for the Local Church Day. 
Center attention on the way in which 
God is seeking to speak through the 
youth of your church. The activities 
of this day should lead to personal 
commitment and the need for a real- 
istic Christian witness in all the areas 
of Christian witness. 

Through the Week Activities — 

1. A Town Meeting of the Air to 
consider a question of major concern 
to the Christian young people of your 
community. P o s,s i b 1 e suggestion : 
What should the church be doing in 
my community ? Is the church of to- 
day preparing youth for tomorrow's 
issues ? If there is no radio time avail- 
able, hold an old fashioned "town 
meeting. ' ' 

2. Discovery Groups on the Bible 
on a community-wide basis to find 
out how God is still speaking to us 
through the Bible. These groups 
might meet each morning for break- 
fast during the week. Your group 
might use the Bible discussion ma- 
terial of the Christian Youth Confer- 



*Director of Young People's Work of the 
International Council of Religious Educa- 
tion and Executive Secretary of the United 
Christian Youth Movement. 



ence of North America, available 
through the U.C.Y.M. office. 

3. A Youth Survey mid Enlistment 
Campaign to do something about the 
unchurched young people of your 
community. Evangelism can be an 
important feature of Youth Week. 
Teams of young people calling on oth- 
er young people can be an effective 
part of this effort. These teams can 
also make a survey and build up pros- 
pect lists to be used by the churches 
during Lent. 

4. Other Special Features may in- 
clude a Fellowship Night or service 
projects that will affect the communi- 
ty as a whole. 

Sunday, February 6 — An Ecumenical 
Service of Worship — 
The theme for this day is ' ' Let God 
Speak Through a United Church!" 
Bring all the youth of your communi- 
ty together on Sunday afternoon to 
face the question of "Why Are the 
Churches So Divided?" A specially 
prepared service of worship is avail- 
able for use in this service. Make it 
truly a great service. 



CONSTITUTION & CONSULTATIVE 
COMMITTEES TO MEET. 

For the next few months, two com- 
mittees, the Constitution Committee 
and the Consultative Committee, will 
be working together in preparing the 
groundwork of the new young peo- 
ple's organization of the United 
Church of Christ. Six young people 
from the Youth Fellowship and six 
from the Pilgrim Fellowship are di- 
vided among two committees. The 
first meeting was held on the week- 
end of November 27 and 28 in Phila- 
delphia. Baxter Twiddy represented 
the Pilgrim Fellowship in the south. 

Even the barriers and problems of 
forming a new organization were 
surmounted in the spirit of fellowship 
which prevailed. In the first meet- 
ing, many of the basic problems were 
faced as — what would be the relation- 
ship of the United Student Fellow- 
ship to the National Council? how 
many commissions would be necessary 
to carry out the actual work of the 
Council? and how may the program 
for young people reach the local 
church? Both of the committees met 
in order that all might be fully orient- 



ed and in order that the Constitution 
Committee would be able to offer its 
suggestions to the Consultative Com- 
mittee. 

The planning for a new young peo- 
ple's organization is a very difficult 
task, but there is wonderful opportu- 
nity to form this new group into a 
more perfect organization than either 
the Youth Fellowship or the Pilgrim 
Fellowship. We should learn from 
the imperfections of these two organ- 
ization. 

A second meeting was held on the 
week-end of January 8 and 9, 1949, 
again in Philadelphia. Concrete 
plans should be taking shape now. 

C. Baxter Twiddy. 



North Carolina and Virginia Pil- 
grim Fellowship is planning a Spring 
Rally the last of March or first of 
April. Watch for date and place. 
Miss Dorothy Ballenger of our First 
Church, Greensboro, is the president. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON. 
(Continued from page 12.) 

again the Master sees .the trick. He 
will not presume upon God. He will 
not put God. to irrational tests. He 
will go ahead in the quieter ways of 
service, teaching and preaching and 
letting His truth be His vindication. 
He had not come as a Miracle-worker, 
although on occasions He did perform 
miracles. He had come to preach a 
message of truth ; and that must be 
accepted for its own sake. There is 
no other way of accepting it. 

For a Season. 
This is the first record that we have 
that Jesus was tempted. But it is not 
the last one. The devil "departed 
from Him for a season." But again 
and again during His ministry, like 
us, He was tempted and tempted. 
But unlike us, He never yielded, He 
never sinned. Surely this man was 
the Son of God. 

The Sword, of the Spirit. 
It was not the only saving factor in 
the situation, but it was a big factor — 
"it is writeen" said Jesus. If we 
hide His word in our hearts, we will 
not be so likely to sin against Him. 
By their aid we can the better put to 
flight the evil one. 



Every one comes between men's 
souls and God, either as a brick wall 
or as a bridge. Either you are lead- 
ing men to God or you are driving 
them away.. — Canon Lindsay Dewar. 



Page Twelve, 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 20, 1949. 



Sunday School Lesson 

By Rev. H. S. Hardcastle, D. D. 



THE TEMTATION OF JESUS. 

Lesson V — January 30, 1949. 

Memory Selection : For we have not 
a high priest who is unable to sym- 
pathize with our weakness, but one 
who in every respect has been 

. tempted as we are, yet without sin- 
ning. — Hebrews 4:15. 

Lesson : Luke 4:1-13. 
Devotional Reading : James 1 :1-12. 
He Was Tempted. 
One reason why out Lord Jesus 
Christ means so much to us, is that He 
knows what it is to be tempted. He 
"was in every respect . . . tempted 
a.s we are" wrote the author of He- 
brews. That gives him a kinship with 
us. It also makes it possible for Him 
to sympathize with us in our tempta- 
tions and weaknesses. He knows how 
we feel and He knows how to help us. 
We need to be reminded that God is 
not standing off, impersonally looking; 
on, and rather waiting - for us to fall, 
but rather He is with us and within 
us, seeking* to give us the victory 
through His Holy Spirit. When you 
are tempted, remember that Jesus was 
tempted, too, tempted in a real sense, 
tempted with the possibility of yield- 
ing. That needs to be written in cap- 
ital letters. Jesus could have yielded. 
He was a free moral agent. He had 
to make His own decision when tempt- 
ed even as you and I have to make our 
own decision. He was like us in this 
He was tempted. 

The Temptation Put in Story 
Form. 

It is quite certain that the story of 
Jesus' temptation came from the lips 
of Jesus Himself. He was alone in 
the wilderness or the desert during 
the temptation and there was nobody 
at hand to see or to report the temp- 
tation. In fact it was an inner strug- 
gle and even if anybody had been 
present, they would not have seen 
anything. This does not mean that 
the story is fiction, or that it is not 
true. Jesus simply put in story or 
dramatic form the inner struggle 
which went on, as alone He consid- 
ered His life mission, and as He con- 
sidered the subtle suggestions that 
came from the evil one or the devil, 
the embodiment of the spirit of evil. 
Hollywood would, of course, have 
dressed up the story. Luke and Mat- 



thew tell it in simple, straightforward 
words, which tell their own story. 
In short, in a dramtaic way, by a 
series of images which His followers 
could well understand, Jesus told His 
disciples about the conflict which took 
place in His mind. The temptation 
was none the less real because it was 
an inner, spiritual struggle through 
which he passed. 

Consecration, Then Temptation. 
' ' And Jesus full of the Holy Spirit, 
returned from Jordan — He returned 
from His baptismal experience, at 
which He had publicly consecrated 
Himself to the Father's will, and at 
which He had heard the Father's 
commendation — and was led in the 
Spirit in the wilderness. The temp- 
tation came imediately after consecra- 
tion. As a matter of fact temptation 
sometimes comes not only after a high 
hour, it actually comes during a high 
hour. It is worth noting that Jesus 
did not deliberately court temptation. 
A man is a fool who deliberately puts 
himself in the way of temptation. It 
was while in the path of doing God's 
will that the temptation came and it 
was because of this fact that the di- 
vine resources were working for Him. 
We are to pray, "Lead us not into 
temptation." We are to avoid temp- 
tation whenever and wherever pos- 
sible. But when we are tempted we 
have a right to pray "Deliver us from 
evil." Every man is tempted. And 
the better he would be the more he 
will be tempted. 

Temptation Number One. 
"If thou be the Son of God — there 
is a subtle tone of doubt in these 
words, or else a cynical challenge — " 
If thou be the Son of God, command 
this stone that it shall become bread. 
The Master was hungry, He had 
fasted a long time. He was the Son 
of God. He had infinite power within 
Himself. Lying all around Him were 
flat stones, like unto the flat loaves of 
bread commonly used by the people. 
Why not use His divine power to turn 
at least one of those stones into a loaf 
of bread? No harm in that, was 
there ? But J esus saw the trick in the 
thing. It Avas the temptation to use 
His divine power for His own human 
need. It was the temptation to claim 
special privilege as the Son of God, to 
claim exemption from the limitations 



of the flesh. He would have none of 
the thing. Calmly, courageously He 
replied with a verse of Scripture: 
"Man cannot live by bread alone" — 
the Scripture says so. And man at 
his best also says so. Power is to be 
held in trust. It is to be used for 
others, not for self or selfish purposes. 
He refused to aid himself by any 
powers denied to me. 

Temptation Number Two. 
The devil is a persistent fellow. He 
comes back again and again and he 
uses new tactics and a new attack. In 
His imagination, Jesus saw in a mo- 
ment from a place of vantage, all the 
kingdoms of the world. They were 
His for the asking. All He had to do 
was to bow down and worship before 
the devil. The passion of his heart 
was the Kingdom of God. He wanted 
more than anything else for the King- 
dom of God to come. And here was 
an easy way to get it, at least that is 
what the devil suggested. It was the 
old, old, and ever new temptation to 
compromise with evil to attain good, 
to take the short cut, to sell out to get 
what one wants, even if it is some- 
thing good. Oftentimes one has only 
to strike a bargain or to fix a com- 
promise to get what he wants. But 
with God there can be no compro- 
mise with evil. Jesus must use God's 
powers on God's terms, and do God's 
work with God's tools. All or noth- 
ing — there is no other way for the 
Son of God.- Or for us. There are 
all too many of us trying to take short 
cuts, and compromising our ideals 
instead of paying the price of sacri- 
fice for worthy ends. 

Temptation Number Three. 
After failing to find the Master 
vulnerable to the first two tempta- 
tions, Old Big Boy tried again. This 
time in His imagination Jesus was 
sitting on the pinnacle of the Temple, 
from whence He commanded a mag- 
nificent view of one of the great 
scenes in the world of that day, and 
Old Big Boy suggested that He cast 
himself off and - make a spectacular 
descent to the ground far below. ' ' No 
danger in it, of course, good fellow, 
for has not your Father told you that 
His angels will take care of you, and 
bear you up, lest you dash your foot 
against a stone." By doing this you 
will get a hearing at once, much 
quicker than by the slow, painful, 
seemingly unfruitful way of teaching 
and preaching. It would be the quick- 
est, and the devil suggests the surest 
way to get and grip the people Avhom 
He wanted so much to serve. But 
Continued on page 11.) 



January 20, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Thirteen. 



iaiajaisiaf0iaMaiaiSJ3JMSi3J3Jsiajsisigisippaisisis 

| The Orphanage 1 

i Chas. D. Johnston, Supt. | 

Deak Friends: 

This letter is the beginning of the 
new year for the Christian Orphan- 
age. Our financial report is the first 
for the new year. We appreciate the 
splendid cooperation the churches and 
friends of these orphaned and depen- 
dent children gave us last year. I had 
hoped to reach our goal of $50,000.00, 
but circumstances did not so will it, 
and we bow in humble submission. 

I have been in this work for more 
than thirty-two years. The people 
have been good to me, and I appreci- 
ate it. We have trained and sent 
out more than five hundred boys and 
girls during my administration. Most 
of them have made good and we are 
proud of them. Of course, some have 
done better than others, which is ex- 
pected of any family. The majority 
of them have finished high school. 
Many of the girls have taken training 
in nursing and are now practicing 
their profession. Many of the girls 
have taken training in business 
courses at Elon College. Some of 
the boys and girls have taken the full 
college course at Elon College. One 
boy finished at State College where he 
took training in electrical engineer- 
ing and now holds a position with 
one of the largest corporations in the 
South. In nearly all of these cases the 
Orphanage has borrowed money and 
let them give their note without en- 
dorsement to pay their college ex- 
penses and let them work at the Or- 
phanage for their room and board. 
After they get through college and 
get a job and begin to draw a salary, 
they begin to pay it back five and ten 
dollars a month until they get it all 
paid back. I am glad to say that in 
every case not a child has failed me 
but everyone has paid his note in full. 
Some of them are now holding posi- 
tions with some of the largest cor- 
porations in the country. In fact, 
two of our girls, I am told, are now 
holding positions with the largest 
corporation of its kind in the world. 
I have not been able to accumulate 
any earthly goods to rest my head 
on in my old age, but I have given it 
freely and forgetting self in behalf of 
these little children. If I have been 
able to point them to a higher life and 
!help them when they had no other 
ihome to which to go, I am happy to 
have had this opportunity to serve. 
, When you support the Christian 
1 Orphanage you are supporting a 



worthy cause. You are helping little 
tots that have no other home. I have 
had a number of children say to me, 
' ' I will always love the Christian Or- 
phanage because it gave me a home 
when I had no other. ' ' It has helped 
many boys and girls who were home- 
less and dependent and gave them a 
chance in life. 

Chas. D. Johnston, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT FOR JANUARY 1-20, 1949. 
Sunday School Monthly Offerings. 

Eastern N. C. Conference : 

Bethel $25.69 

Beulah S. S 3.17 

Martha's Chapel 8.31 

37.17 

Eastern Va. Conference: 
Berea (Norfolk) T'giving $ 60.22 

Mt. Zion S. S 10.00 

Newport News S. S 11.35 

Union (Surry) 46.00 

127.37 

N. C. & Va. Conference : 

Lebanon $10.00 

Mt. Zion 20.00 

30.00 

Va. Valley Conference: 

Antioch S. S $ 8.09 

Mt. Olivet (G) S. S 19.13 

27.22 

Ga. Conference: 
United Columbus S. S 13.92 

Total $ 235.88 

Special Offerings. 

Mrs. Sullo, children $ 26.12 

Mrs. Leigh, children 38.99 

Mr. Cook, children 10.00 

Neese-Baracca Class, Reids- 

ville, J. O. Davidson's 

shoes 6.98 

National Bank 27.00 

Woman's Board, Mrs. W. V. 

Leathers, Treasurer . . . 10.00 

— 119.09 

County : 

Alamance, Doris Ward ..$20.00 
Guilford, Ridge children . 60.00 

80.00 



Total $ 199.09 



Grand total $ 434.97 

o 

CLOTHING DONATIONS RECEIVED 
FROM JULY 21, 1948, THROUGH 
JANUARY 5, 1949. 
Mrs. J. H. Tapscott, Burlington, N. C: 
clothing. 

Mrs. Alice Wilson, Robinson, 111.: cloth- 
ing. 

Mrs. J. A. Barnwell, Burlington, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Mrs. T. J. Earp, Milton, N. C. : clothing. 
Miss Bertha Iseley, Burlington, N. C. : 
clothing. 

A Friend, Box 37, Waverly, Va. : clothing. 
Mrs. Willie Duck, Dadeville, Ala.: cloth- 
ing. 

Mrs. Carl Hartman, N. Charleston, S. C: 
clothing. 

Mrs. J. B. Nicholson, Jr., Wakefield, Va. : 
clothing. 

Mrs. J. E. King, Burlington, N. C. : cloth- 
ing. 



Mrs. H. R. Farlow, Sophia, N. C. : cloth- 
ing. 

Mrs. J. A. Perry, Sunbury, N. C. : cloth- 
ing. 

Mrs. Clara M. Taylor, Burlington, N. C: 
clothing. 

Mrs. J. H. McEwen, Burlington, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Mrs. A. Y. Allred, High Point, N. C: 
clothing. 

Mrs. R. J. Dunn, Danville, Va. : clothing. 
Mrs. A. L. Goswick, Williamsburg, Va. : 
clothing. 

Mrs. Frank Mitchell & Sister, Burlington, 
N. C. : clothing. 

Miss Dorothy Williams, Franklin, Va. : 
clothing and shoes. 

Miss Rena M. Iseley, Burlington, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Mrs. F. E. Butler, Suffolk, Va. : clothing. 
Mrs. James Stone, Burlington, N. C. 
clothing. 

Mrs. Charlie Williams, Roanoke, Ala. 
clothing for Rachel Williams. 

Mrs. Stafford Foster, Burlington, N. C. 
clothing. 

Mrs. J. R. Truitt, Greensboro, N. C. 
clothing. 

Rev. James Home, Elon College, N. C. 
clothing. 

Mrs. M. B. Zoll, Portsmouth, Va. : cloth- 
ing for Dolly Hutchens. 

Mrs. A. B. McFoster, Guilford, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Mrs. A. L. Hanbury, South Norfolk, Va. : 
clothing. 

Reidsville Friends, ReMsville, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Damascus Missionary Society, Sunbury, 
N. C. : clothing. 

Miss Edith Walker, Burlington, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Mrs. W. C. Seely, Waverly, Va. : clothing. 

Mrs. Jerry Strader, Burlington, N. C. : 
grapefruit juice. 

Mrs. J. M. Byrum, Sunbury, N. C. : cloth- 
ing. 

Mrs. Clara Simpson, Chapel Hill, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Miss Mary E. Lassiter, Sunbury, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Mrs. E. W. Beale, Sr., Zuni, Va. : clothing. 

Reliable Bible Class, Portsmouth Christian 
Church, Portsmouth, Va.: clothing for Hel- 
en Cooke. 

Mr. Foster, Burlington, N. C. : hose. 

Mrs. Clyde Gordon, Burlington, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Miss Jennye B. Cobb, Richmond, Va. : 
clothing. 

Mrs. H. R. Byrd, Golden Rule Class, New- 
port News, Va. ; clothing. 

Mrs. T. A. Lamm, Burlington, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Miss Eula Tapscott, Burlington, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Mrs. Walter Kirkman, Burlington, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Hope Mills Christian Church, Hope Mills, 
N. C. : clothing. 

Mrs. G. H. Pierce, Windsor, Va. : clothing. 

Chapel Hill Missionary Society, Chapel 
Hill, N. C. : clothing. 

Mrs. W. F. Francis, Suffolk, Va. : clothing. 

Mrs. Lessie Pugh, Morrisville, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Rebecca & Joe Fogleman, Liberty, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Mrs. A. B. Williams, Norfolk, Va. : 
clothing. 

(Continued on page 15.) 



Page Fourteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 20, 1949 



BUDGET & APPORTIONMENT. 
( Continued from page 3. ) 

of God which gives to men and women 
common spiritual values and a com- 
mon sense of direction can save. And 
the force which can achieve this is a 
virile and conquering Christianity. 
The fate of our civilization — of our 
country, of our homes and of our 
children depends upon winning man- 
kind to the teachings of Christ. ' ' 

Our Christian World Mission is our 
response, as Congregational Chris- 
tians, to the cry of all people, both at 
home and abroad. Our Christian 
World Mission is our 1949 program of 
local, national and world-wide Chris- 
tian ministry. It is our enlarged mis- 
sionary and rehabilitation work 
placed in the setting of overall Call to 
Evangelism and the total program of 
our churches. It is our sector of an 
Advanced Movement of Protestant- 
ism in the United States and Canada 
toward a Christian Nation and toward 
One World in Christ. 

Our Southern Convention in ses- 
sion at Liberty (Vance) Christian 
Church, April 27-28, 1948, unani- 
mously voted to accept the challenge 
inherent in "Our Christian World 
Mission" resolving "that our spirit- 
ual, human, and financial resources be 
mobilized, committed and directed in 
a program of Advance during the bi- 
enninm 1948-50." Such an Advance 
equal to onr commission in Christ will 
not be possible with half-hearted al- 
legiance, the fragments or incidentals ! 
We must give ourselves, our all ! 
Holding the line is not sufficient to 
stem the tide of evil which threatens 
to engulf America and the world for 
which Jesus died to save ! Let us go 
forward to meet our God-entrusted 
stewardship with Christlike faithful- 
ness ! Are we able? Yes, we are able! 
Are we willing? That is the question 
we shall have to answer! Now! 

The accompanying Schedules of Ap- 
portionments of the various Confer- 
ences include our reasonable share in 
this urgent "Program of Advance" 
for Christlike services at home and 
abroad, together with slight increases 
in the apportionments of the Chris- 
tian Orphanage, Elon College, the 
Board of Christian Education, and 
the Convention Fund. 

A comparison of the new apportion- 
ment with the amounts paid by each 
church during the past two Confer- 
ence years will show that the churches 
actually gave amounts approximating 
the new apportionment totals. 

Your Convention and Conference 
are grateful for the hearty coopera- 
tion given in the past and urge each 



APPORTIONMENT TABLE— N. C. & VA. CONFERENCE. 













a 
o 


















p 
















"3 




NAME OF CHURCH 


a 

.2 
c-S2 
■SS 
«S 


ntion 
ign Missio 


M 
03 

a 


o 
be 

V 

o 


an Educa 


.nnuation 


Qtion Fun 


pita Dues 


ence and 


sterial Scb 
Fund 






^ P 


ID <1> 




O 
a 


•43 


2 

0J 


Qi 
> 


09 

O 


u 

"a 


3 & 


3 








a 






3 


O 


0 


c 


win 
3 » 


+a 
O 






O 


Q 


M 


O 


to 


O 


PH 


0 






Apple's Chapel 


$ 165 


_ t .„ 


% 136 


$ 135 


$ 44 


$ 4o 


$ 8b 


$ o4 


$ 


• Oft 


t 822 


Asheville 


37 


52 


25 


27 


8 


8 


15 


8 




6 


186 


Belew Creek 


64 


43 


29 


46 


1 Q 
Jo 


22 


24 






22 


297 




64 


43 


29 


46 


19 


13 


44 


10 




22 


290 


Bethel 


60 




71 


73 


if 


13 


25 








342 


Bet hlehem 


168 


1 onr! 


127 


141 


41 


40 


82 


97 




00 
00 


799 


Burlington 


490 


1 ,o99 


2,735 


607 


156 


148 


264 


DA 

64 




135 


5,998 


Carolina 


44 


20 


18 


27 


14 


1 1 


38 


6 




on 


198 


Concord 


71 


50 


43 


55 


22 


13 


00 


g 




23 


324 


Danville 


410 


™^ 


59 


61 


27 


1 1f 


56 


64 




31 


1,183 




672 




369 


534 


125 


151 




35 




108 


2,880 




24 


10 


12 


11 


7 




18 


2 




12 


99 




467 


435 


246 


427 


97 


94 


*s§ 


35 




77 


2,074 


Gobsonville 


81 


60 


44 


61 


20 


27 


51 


17 




25 


386 


Graham-Providence 


40 




10 


23 


HI 


n 


20 


Q 




18 


155 


Greensboro First 


578 


545 


312 


534 


yo 




239 


36 




OP, 


2,526 




124 


120 


119 


115 


27 


24 


45 


21 




23 


618 




138 


113 


104 


109 




00 


69 


22 




34 


668 




131 


100 


92 


107 


27 


26 


56 


13 




33 


585 


Hebron 


67 




32 


49 


14 


13 


26 


g 




22 


275 




84 


o4 


59 


61 


on 


27 


37 


10 




25 


407 


Howard's Chapel 


47 


27 


20 


32 


14 


1 j 


26 


0 




20 


205 


17 


7 


12 


11 


7 


7 


6 






12 


81 




191 


160 


149 


165 


AA 


O.G 

00 


BO 


17 




46 


892 


Ivy Hill 


3 


Q 
O 


I 


1 




j 


I 


1 




0 


14 




47 


97 


18 


30 


14 


22 


20 


n 




20 


194 


Lebanon 


71 


47 


42 


55 


16 


13 


38 


n 




22 


315 




71 


47 


38 


55 


19 


13 


38 


16 




23 


320 


Long's Chapel 


91 


67 


56 


70 


20 


19 


44 


13 




25 


405 


Lynchburg 


91 


67 


56 


69 


22 


19 


50 


10 




25 


409 


Mebane 


13 


7 


12 


21 


14 


7 


7 


2 




14 


97 


Monticello 


50 


27 


24 


30 


15 


11 


32 


7 




2 


198 


Mt Bethel 


74 


74 


71 


67 


16 


16 


28 


5 




13 


364 


Mt Zion 


81 


60 


50 


63 


22 


16 


50 


13 




23 


378 


New Lebanon 


121 


94 


86 


97 


27 


24 


50 


15 




34 


548 




34 


13 


12 


18 


14 


8 


20 


2 




16 


137 




104 


80 


71 


79 


29 


30 


56 


21 




28 


498 


Pleasant Ridge. . 


50 


27 


24 


35 


16 


8 


25 


4 




20 


209 




228 


194 


187 


194 


34 


54 


106 


44 




55 


1,096 


Rocky Ford 


24 


10 


12 


11 


7 


3 


18 


2 




12 


99 




50 


30 


24 


36 


14 


8 


38 


10 




18 


228 


Shallow Ford 


104 


80 


74 


80 


22 


22 


64 


16 




28 


490 


Tryon, Erskine Memorial 


134 


110 


95 


207 


35 


27 


64 


16 




33 


621 


Union, North Carolina 


121 


90 


82 


97 


35 


24 


71 


26 




57 


603 


Union, Virginia 


138 


114 


104 


115 


35 


34 


64 


35 




33 


672 


Winston-Salem 


71 


23 


14 


27 


10 


16 


26 


2 




32 


221 




$6,005 


$5,995 


$6,005 


$4,814 


$1,352 


$1,336 


$2,724 


$ 756 


$1 


,419 


$ 30,406 



*Includes Church Extension, 
flncludes Shaowu Special. 



APPORTIONMENT TABLE— WESTERN N. C. CONFERENCE. 













a 

_o 




















a 

0 






03 




■a 
a 






t 








a 
0 










a 

0 


3 






3 


a 

3 




NAME OF CHURCH 


ention 
me Missi 


ention 
eign Mis 


0 
u 
i 
a 
a 


College 


tian Edi 


rannuati 


ention F 


iterial Sc 
p Fund 


Capita D 


erence F 






a 0 
§w 


1 


a 


a 

0 


hris 


0 
0. 
3 


a 
0 


'3 


3 
01 


<a 


onf 


% 
0 




0 


0 


O 


W 


O 


03 


0 


3 




P4 


O 


(n 




$ 100 


$ 100 


$ 75 


$ 75 


$ 20 


$ 20 


$ 50 


% 


5 


$ 10 


$ 20 


$ 475 


Antioch fC) 


25 


25 


20 


25 


10 


10 


20 




5 


10 


10 


160 


Antioch (R) 


25 


25 


10 


10 


10 


5 


5 




5 


5 


5 


105 




100 


125 


50 


50 


20 


20 


20 




5 


10 


20 


420 


Bailey's Grove 


25 


25 


20 


25 


10 


10 


20 




5 


10 


20 


170 




25 


25 


20 


25 


10 


10 


20 




5 


10 


10 


160 


Big Oak 


25 


25 


20 


20 


10 


10 


20 




5 


' 10 


15 


160 




40 


40 


30 


30 


10 


10 


15 




5 


10 


10 


200 


Brown's Chapel 


40 


40 


20 


20 


10 


10 


30 




6 


10 


15 


200 


Ether 


60 


60 


40 


40 


10 


10 


40 




5 


10 


25 


300 


Flint Hill (M) 


25 


25 


20 


20 


10 


10 


15 




5 


10 


10 


150 


Flint Hill (R) 


25 


25 


20 


20 


10 


10 


15 




5 


10 


10 


150 


Grace's Chapel 


60 


60 


50 


50 


20 


20 


30 




5 


10 


35 


340 


Hank's Chapel 


100 


100 


60 


60 


20 


20 


30 




5 


10 


25 


430 


High Point 


40 


40 


30 


30 


10 


10 


20 




5 


10 


20 


215 


Liberty 


50 


50 


30 


35 


10 


10 


20 




5 


10 


20 


240 


Mt. p leasant 


30 


30 


25 


25 


10 


10 


20 




5 


10 


15 


180 


Needham's Grove 


30 


30 


20 


20 


10 


10 


20 




5 


10 


20 


175 


New Center 


30 


30 


20 


25 


10 


10 


20 




5 


10 


20 


180 


Parks Cross Roads 


30 


30 


20 


20 


10 


10 


20 




5 


10 


20 


175 


Patterson's Grove 


25 


25 


20 


20 


5 


5 


10 




5 


5 


10 


130 


Pleasant Cross 


25 


25 


20 


20 


10 


10 


15 




5 


10 


10 


150 


Pleasant Grove 


40 


40 


35 


35 


20 


20 


20 




5 


10 


25 


250 


Pleasant Hill 


120 


120 


75 


75 


35 


40 


60 




5 


20 


50 


600 


Pleasant Ridge 


110 


110 


65 


65 


20 


20 


50 




5 


20 


65 


530 


Pleasant Union 


25 


25 


20 


20 


10 


10 


15 




5 


10 


20 


160 




25 


25 


10 


10 


5 


5 


5 




5 


5 


5 


100 


Ramseur 


100 


100 


60 


60 


20 


20 


30 




5 


15 


30 


440 




50 


50 


35 


35 


10 


10 


20 




5 


10 


25 


250 


Seagrove 


40 


40 


40 


40 


20 


20 


30 




5 


5 


25 


265 


Shady Grove 


25 


25 


20 


15 


5 


5 


15 




5 


5 


5 


125 


Shiloh 


40 


40 


35 


30 


10 


10 


20 




5 


10 


20 
25 


220 




50 


50 


45 


40 


10 


10 


30 




5 


10 


275 


Sophia 


25 


25 


20 


20 


20 


10 


20 




5 


10 


25 


180 


Spoon's Chapel 


25 


25 


20 


20 


10 


10 


10 




5 


10 


15 


150 


Union Grove 


25 


25 


20 


20 


10 


10 


20 




5 


10 


25 


170 


Zion 


25 


25 


20 


20 


10 


10 


20 




5 


10 


15 


160 


Totals 


$1,660 


$1,685 


$1,160 


$1,170 


$ 470 


$ 460 


$ 840 


$ 185 


$ 370 


$ 740 


$ 8,740 



•Inclndes Church Extension, 
tlncludes Shaowu Special. 



January 20, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Fifteen. 



church that with high vision and 
prayer it will accept the challenge 
presented in the Schedule of Appor- 
tionment which is presented. 

Each church in the Convention is 
asked to accept a slight but necessary 
increase in its apportionment for the 
year 1948-49 as shown. 

The small increase asked for the 



Convention Fund is necessary to meet 
an unavoidable increase in running 
expenses. The Orphanage increase is 
absolutely essential because of the ris- 
ing cost of food, clothing, medical 
care, and other expenses involved in 
its operation. The increase for Elon 
College is to help provide more trained 
leaders for our churches. 



The 1948-49 apportionment for the 
first time includes special offerings 
which we are accustomed to make in 
addition to our regular apportion- 
ment. They are, for instance, our Spe- 
cial Easter Offering for Church Ex- 
tension under Home Missions, Shao- 
wu under Foreign Missions, and Spe- 
cial Thanksgiving Offering for the 
Orphanage. In other words, our spe- 
cial offerings, "Over and Above 
Gifts," "Cent- A- Meal Offerings," 
etc., will be credited to apportion- 
ment. 

In many instances our churches 
have a good practice of giving more 
than the total amount asked of them 
in the apportionment. Some churches 
over-pay their apportionment for 
some of the institutions of our church. 
This is a commendable policy and one 
that should be continued in order to 
make up for those churches that are 
negligent in meeting their obligation 
for these same institutions. It is also 
important that each church give due 
consideration to the support of those 
institutions and agencies in which 
some of our churches have shown but 
little or no interest in the past. 

We recommend and strongly urge 
that all ministers pledge themselves to 
keep the entire program, w ith all its 
financial requirements, constantly be- 
fore the churches throughout the 
year; In order that our people may 
become more impressed with the im- 
portance of giving full support to 
every department of our work. 

Increasingly our churches pay por- 
tions of the apportionment monthly 
or quarterly, instead of waiting until 
the end of the year. We commend 
this practice of regular monthly or 
quarterly payments and urge all our 
churches to follow it. 



ORPHANAGE GIFTS. 

(Continued from page 13.) 

Miss Nellie G. White, Greensboro, N. C: 
clothing-. 

Mrs. H. R. Clem, Burlington, N. C: one 
coat. 

Miss Grace Pickett, Burlington, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Pleasant Hill Missionary Society, Liberty, 
N. C. : clothing. 

Mrs. W. J. Baines, Suffolk, Va. : clothing. 

Ladies Aid Society, Albemarle Christian 
Church, Albemarle, N. C. : clothing. 

Woman's Missionary Society, Lowell 
Christian Church, Roanoke, Ala. : clothing, 
towels, one quilt. 

Mrs. J. C. Beale, Franklin, Va. : clothing. 

Mrs. O. C. Hopkins, Jr., Burlington, N. 
C. : clothing. 

Miss Nellie May Holt, Burlington, N. C. : 
clothing. 

Mrs. Jolly & Mrs. Sanders, Burlington, N. 
C. : clothing. 



APPORTIONMENT TABLE— EASTERN VIRGINIA CONFERENCE. 



NAME OF CHURCH 


Convention 
Home Missions* 


Convention 
Foreign Missionsf 


Orphanage 


Elon College 


Christian Education 


Superannuation 


Convention Fund 


Per Capita Dues 


Conference Fund 


Ministerial Scholar- 
ship Fund 


Conference Home 
Missions 


Virginia Council 
of Churches 


Totals 




$ 60 


i 57 


$ 12 


$ 85 


$ 22 


$ 13 


$ 22 


$ 10 


$ 5 


$ 5 


$ 10 


$ 5 


$ 317 




15 


14 


6 


20 


11 


7 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


2 


100 


Nerea (Nansemond) .... 


100 


99 


93 


60 


44 


33 


38 


10 


15 


15 


25 


4 


536 




130 


156 


60 


40 


55 


33 


55 


15 


15 


15 


35 


5 


614 


Bethlehem (Disputna).. 


30 


28 


12 


10 


11 


7 


11 


10 


5 


5 


5 


4 


138 




145 


142 


139 


125 


66 


80 


55 


35 


15 


15 


50 


15 


882 




15 


14 


10 


10 


11 


7 


11 


2 


5 


5 


5 


1 


96 




15 


14 


6 


15 


10 


5 


5 


4 


5 


5 


5 


2 


91 




145 


156 


151 


115 


44 


47 


49 


22 


15 


15 


50 


11 


820 




20 


20 


60 


15 


10 


7 


5 


2 


3 


3 


2 


1 


148 




50 


50 


50 


50 


10 


10 


30 


15 


10 


10 


10 


10 


305 




285 


311 


141 


245 


45 


80 


110 


22 


15 


15 


75 


12 


1,356 




300 


250 


275 


250 


58 


70 


132 


28 


10 


10 


75 


12 


1,470 




110 


100 


140 


140 


45 


45 


80 


20 


10 


10 


25 


9 


734 




30 


24 


6 


10 


11 


7 


5 


10 


5 


5 


4 


6 


123 




35 


42 


30 


75 


11 


7 


22 


5 


10 


10 


10 


2 


259 


Johnson's Grove 


20 


20 


10 


10 


11 


7 


5 


5 


5 


5 


3 


2 


103 




115 


113 


121 


145 


35 


40 


49 


22 


15 


15 


40 


12 


722 




145 


142 


82 


105 


44 


27 


55 


15 


15 


15 


35 


7 


687 




15 


14 


6 


15 


11 


7 


5 


4 


5 


5 


5 


2 


94 




45 


42 


12 


30 


11 


13 


16 


5 


10 


10 


10 


2 


206 


Newport News 


435 


600 


250 


400 


120 


150 


200 


30 


25 


25 


100 


15 


2,350 


Norfolk : Bay View — 


45 


42 


24 


40 


11 


7 


22 


5 


10 


10 


5 


4 


225 


Christian Temple. . . . 


940 


940 


300 


850 


132 


157 


400 


80 


35 


35 


100 


31 


4,000 




100 


100 


140 


140 


40 


40 


71 


20 


10 


10 


35 


9 


715 


Little Creek 


20 


20 


30 


5 


5 


3 


5 


5 


2 


2 


2 


1 


100 




500 


600 


800 


480 


90 


81 


175 


30 


25 


25 


80 


14 


2,900 
686 




115 


113 


114 


155 


22 


40 


60 


14 


10 


10 


30 


3 




60 


57 


24 


60 


11 


7 


27 


7 


5 


5 


10 


3 


276 




130 


128 


91 


125 


33 


27 


44 


25 


15 


10 


35 


10 


673 


Portsmouht: Elm Ave. 


145 


136 


46 


50 


22 


27 


33 


12 


5 


5 


30 


3 


504 




200 


199 


150 


185 


44 


47 


77 


10 


10 


10 


35 


6 


973 


Shelton Memorial. . . . 


45 


43 


24 


15 


22 


14 


22 


5 


10 


10 


5 


3 


217 




145 


142 


121 


185 


22 


27 


55 


10 


15 


15 


35 


5 


777 


South Norfolk 


240 


241 


161 


230 


44 


33 


93 


42 


15 


15 


60 


20 


1,194 




45 


45 


24 


30 


11 


7 


22 


5 


5 


5 


10 


2 


211 




960 


960 


781 


960 


166 


201 


433 


100 


40 


40 


300 


43 


4,984 


Sunbury, Damascus. . . 


75 


57 


63 


75 


11 


13 


33 


12 


10 


10 


15 


5 


379 


Union, Southampton . . . 


85 


85 


72 


75 


11 


13 


27 


10 


20 


20 


15 


5 


438 




25 


20 


12 


20 


11 


7 


5 


3 


5 


5 


5 


2 


120 


Wakefield 


65 


62 


24 


60 


22 


7 


22 


9 


5 


5 


10 


4 


295 




170 


170 


72 


185 


22 


13 


88 


15 


10 


15 


25 


5 


790 




130 


128 


121 


110 


22 


13 


44 


9 


15 


15 


3<y 


4 


641 


Totals 

Convention Asking 


$6,500 
6,500 


$6,696 
5,500 


$4,856 
4,800 


$6,005 
6,000 


$1,470 
1,470 


$1,485 
1,470 


$2,734 
2,725 


$724 

862 


$500 
500 


$500 

500 


$1,456 
1,456 


$323 
323 


$ 33,249 
33,106 



•Includes Church Extension, 
flncludes Shaowu Special. 



APPORTIONMENT TABLE— VIRGINIA VALLEY CONFERENCE. 



NAME OF CHURCH 


Convention 
Home Missions* 


Convention 
Foreign Missionsf 


p 
u 

a 

a 
d 
J3 
& 
u 

o 


Elon College 


Christian Education 


Superannuation 


Convention Fund 


Per Capita Dues 


Ministerial Scholar- 
l ship Fund 


Conference Fund 


es 
-tJ 
O 

H 


Apportionments 
Paid, 1947-'48 




$ 172 


$ 100 


$ 85 


$ 85 


S 


29 


$ 29 


$ 58 


$ 8 


$ 5 


$ 71 


$ 642 


$ 649 


Bethel 


114 


75 


67 


82 




24 


24 


45 


15 


9 


45 


500 


244 


Bethlehem 


100 


76 


67 


92 




24 


24 


45 


7 


5 


60 


500 


376 


Beulah 


13 


13 


6 


6 




2 


3 


4 


2 


1 


6 


56 


73 




40 


30 


21 


21 




7 


7 


14 


5 


3 


27 


175 


118 


Dry Run 


44 


30 


28 


42 




11 


11 


18 


7 


4 


35 


230 


148 




16 


16 


9 


9 




3 


3 


7 


3 


1 


9 


76 


44 




130 


80 


79 


109 




28 


28 


51 


15 


10 


105 


635 


494 




140 


110 


70 


90 




28 


28 


54 


15 


10 


105 


650 


626 




42 


26 


42 


26 




9 


10 


18 


7 


5 


65 


250 


100 




47 


37 


23 


23 




9 


10 


18 


9 


7 


17 


200 


101 


Mt. Olivet (G) 


54 


50 


33 


33 




11 


11 


22 


10 


7 


69 


300 


275 


Mt. Olivet (R) 


40 


30 


24 


24 




9 


9 


17 


10 


8 


60 


231 


185 


New Hope 


51 


45 


33 


33 




12 


12 


21 


5 


3 


35 


250 


188 




122 


35 


155 


88 




27 


27 


54 


14 


9 


69 


600 


595 


Palmyra 


19 


19 


12 


12 




4 


4 


9 


8 


5 


18 


110 


85 


Timber Ridge 


111 


91 


66 


66 




22 


22 


44 


19 


12 


69 


522 


441 




160 


607 


100 


100 




61 


58 


126 


23 


15 


110 


1,360 


1,183 




43 


19 


21 


21 




5 


5 


14 


4 


3 


18 


153 


80 


Wood's Chapel 


42 


20 


19 


19 




5 


6 


11 


7 


4 


20 


152 


89 


Totals 


$1,500 


$1,509 


$ 960 


$ 981 


$ 


330 


$ 330 


$ 650 


$ 193 


$ 126 


$1,013 


$7,592 


$6,094 



'Includes Church Extension, 
flncludes Shaowu Special. 



Page Sixteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 20, 1949. 



The Call to Christian Unity 

By ROY C. HELFENSTEIN 

Christian Unity does not require or even ask for uniformity in 
thought or in practice except the thought concerning faith in the good- 
ness of God and the practice of right living. Every denomination has 
within its own circle more than the traditional "57 varieties" of theological 
opinion. No religious leader today could be so naive as to think that any 
denomination has even within its own fold uniformity of theological 
opinion. But that fact has not militated against the denominational fel- 
lowship. Neither will the theological differences militate against the 
fellowship of a United Protestantism, for the spirit of Jesus Christ in the 
hearts of his followers enables them to rise above theological differences 
into The Unity of Christian Love and Service. 

Christian Unity does not seek its goal by the process of elimination 
but by the process of assimilation. Christian Unity does not seek to find 
the lowest common denominator of creedal statement, but instead it seeks 
the highest numerator of Christian thought and expression. Christian 
Unity recognizes the fact that there is good in all denominations and that 
no one denomination has a corner on divine truth; moreover that if any 
denomination sincerely feels that it has some peculiar asset of faith not 
known by other denominations, the only way such a denomination can 
demonstrate its Christian sincerity is by seeking to share its superior claim 
with all denominations by itself helping to promote Christian Unity. 
To refuse to share or to be unconcerned about sharing spiritual values 
is definitely unchristian. 

The sin of exclusive denominationalism for too long has justified 
each group in putting its "light under a bushel." In the days of men's 
ignorance God winked at this offense against His Son and against hu- 
manity; but today He calls the denominations to repent of their weak- 
nesses occasioned by their divisions and to bring forth the spirit of Chris- 
tian Unity as evidence of their repentance. Indeed it is little short of 
blasphemous for the divided Church longer to pray and plead for a 
United World, unless the Church itself is ready to present "a united 
front" to the world. Unless there is sincere effort made soon by all the 
Protestant Churches to set the example of Christian Unity before the 
nations of the world, they will forfeit their right even to ask for or talk 
about a United World. 



HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 1956. 
Southern Convention of Congregational Christian Churches. 

1844 - Over a Century of Service to the Denomination - 1949 

The CHRISTIAN 

ORGAN OF THE SOUTHERN CONVENTION OF CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 
In Essentials, Unity — In Non-Essentials, Liberty — In All Things, Charity 




Volume CI. 



RICHMOND, VA., THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1949. 



Number 4. 



The Christian Sun Salutes 

E'L-ON OOL-L-E-G-E 



ALAMANCE BUILDING 

The Alamance Building is the Administration Building. It houses class- 
rooms, the administrative offices, and the laboratories of the Business, Home 
Economics, Mechanical Drawing and Art Departments. It is one of five 
of the buildings known as the Greater Elon Group. The other buildings 
comprising the group are the Carlton Library, with a stack-room capacity 
for 187,500 volumes and a reading room with seating capacity for one hun- 
dred readers; the Whitley Memorial Auditorium, designed to seat 1,000 
persons, and housing the Music Department; the Mooney Christian Educa- 
tion Building, devoted to the religious and social activities of the College, and 
Duke Science Building, housing the Departments of Physics, Biology, Ge- 
ology and Chemistry. These buildings give teaching facilities unsurpassed 
by any small college in the country. 




Page Two. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 27, 1949. 



News Flashes 



The Virginia Council of Churches 
met this week in Richmond. 



Radio headliners on Tuesday eve- 
ning brought to the world the disturb- 
ing news of the death of forty-six- 
year-old Rev. Dr. Peter Marshall, out- 
standing Washington minister and the 
Chaplain of the United States Senate. 



It has been necessary to omit quite 
a bit of regular material this week in 
order to carry the various articles 
about Elon College. We commend 
these articles to our readers. Their 
perusal will add much to their knowl- 
edge of our Church College and the 
work that it is doing for the denomi- 
nation. 



Rev. Karl Key, who is now secre- 
tary of the North Carolina Council 
of Churches, with headquarters in 
Durham, was a visitor at The Chris- 
tian ,Sun office of publication on 
Tuesday of this week. Dr. Will B. 
O'Neill of Holland and his son were 
also in the office for a short while. 



Young People of the Forsyth Coun- 
ty Churches: Winston-Salem, Pfaff- 
town, Belews Creek and Salem Chap- 
el, are to meet at the Winston-Salem 
Church ,Sunday, January 30, at 4:30 
P. M. Special guests will be the Pil- 
grim Fellowship of the First Congre- 
gational Christian Church, Greens- 
boro, who will present the program. 
Each person of the Forsyth County 
churches is asked to bring sandwiches 
for the supper and the Winston- 
Salem young people will also furnish 
the drink. The program will close 
at 7:30 P. M. Max Marshall of 
Salem Chapel is president of this 
County-wide youth group. 



WE WANT TO SEND REV. D. P. 
BARRETT TO THE PUERTO 
RICO DIAMOND JUBILEE. 

The seventy-fifth anniversary of the 
founding of Protestant Missions in 
Puerto Rico will be observed during 
the week of March 6-13. Our Chris- 
tian Churches will have special serv- 
ives in their own churches a few weeks 
later. 

It is almost imperative that the 
Christian branch of the Congrega- 
tional Christian Church be represent- 
ed at this Diamond Jubilee, and it is 
most appropriate that we should be 



represented by Rev. D. P. Barrett, 
who with his gifted and devoted wife, 
spent more than twenty-five years in 
missionary work in the Ponce area. 
The Mission Board of the Southern 
Convention has asked Mr. Barrett to 
represent our Church, and it is the 
hope of the Board that he will not only 
attend the Union Jubilee, but will also 
visit among the former Christian 
Churches during their special celebra- 
tions. 

The Mission Board has made an 
appropriation toward Mr. Barrett's 
expenses, and the Home Board has 
also graciously and generously voted 
an appropriation for the same pur- 
pose. But more money is needed, and 
it is the feeling of the members of the 
Boards that many of the churches in 
the .Southern Convention, and espe- 
cially in the Eastern Virginia Con- 
ference will want to have a part in 
this project. Furthermore there may 
be many individuals who would be 
glad to make a personal gift as a tok- 
en of appreciation of the long and 
faithful and fruitful services of Mr. 
and Mrs. Barrett. 

Thus it is that as Chairman of the 
Special Committee, I am making this 
appeal for contributions to this wor- 
thy cause. The time is short, the need 
imperative, the cause worthy. Please 
send contributions promptly. Make 
checks payable to me as Chairman of 
the Committee. Acknowledgement 
will be made later in The Christian 
Sun. Pastors are asked to present 
this matter to their churches or Wo- 
men's Missionary Societies at once. 
Thanks for your cooperation. 

H. S. Hardcastle, Gh'm'n, 
Special Committee. 
2308 Roanoke Avenue, 
Newport News, Virginia. 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION FOR 
THE LAYMAN. 

By George D. Colclough. 

In the early history of the church 
in America, we paid the preacher 
very little and expected very little in 
return. In recent years, the majori- 
ty of the ministers are making more 
money than the average member of 
the congregation. As this situation 
has developed, we have pushed the re- 
sponsibility of the church from the 
shoulders of the congregation to that 
of the minister and his staff. As a re- 
sult a great many of our churches are 
doing very little insofar as building 
stronger and better churches in the 
service of the community. Denomina- 
tional schools such as Elon can serve a 
great purpose in helping shift the re- 



sponsibility for the growth of the 
church back to the shoulders of the 
congregation. Perhaps students should 
not have to take courses in Bible or 
religious education while attending a 
denominational college but they 
should certainly be encouraged to do 
so. Some ministers may seek igno- 
rant congregations but the majority 
of the ministers of the Congregational 
Christian Church are anxious to serve 
an educated group of people. If the 
denominational college is to hold its 
own in comparison to the state schools 
in the education of our generation, we 
must do a better job in the training 
of our ministers and in the training of 
all our students to be good laymen. 
Too many of our people have had the 
privilege of college training but when 
they return to their home church, 
they are unwilling to assume respon- 
sibility of teaching in the Sunday 
school and many other tasks that lay- 
men are due to perform. I am per- 
sonally very happy that when I was 
a student at Elon College I was re- 
quired to take at least one year in 
Bible study under Dr. J. U. Newman. 
No other course taken during my col- 
lege career has meant as much to me 
as the course in Bible. A denomina- 
tional college does not need to apolo- 
gize for requiring students to go to 
Sunday school, church services, or to 
take a course in Bible or religious ed- 
ucation. The denominational college 
is supposed to be different from the 
state school and since the most of them 
are small, they can be different and 
give a personal touch to the religious 
life of their students that cannot be 
provided in the larger universities. 



ELON COLLEGE SERVES CHURCH 
THROUGH LAYWOMEN. 

By Mrs. 0. H. Paris, President, 
The Woman's Convention. 

As we look at the churches of the 
Southern Convention and other areas 
being served by ministers who re- 
ceived their under-graduate work at 
Elon College, likewise laymen who 
were trained and inspired during 
their days there, we immediately rec- 
ognize the part our college plays in 
the real work of the denomination. 
We feel except for Elon the leader- 
ship of our churches might not be on 
the high level that it is today. How- 
ever, we sometimes overlook the great 
service the college renders through 
the training of laywomen, a service 
which eventually touches all areas of 
life — the home, the school, the com- 
munity, the church, the state and the 
(Continued on page 15.) 



January 27, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Three, 



Southern Convention Office 



Kev. Wm. T. Scott, Superintendent 



ELON COLLEGE — CONVENTION 
HEAD QUARTERS . 

By Supt. Wm. T. Scott. 

Elon College is the headquarters 
of The Southern Convention. When 
we think of The Southern Conven- 
tion we naturally think of Elon Col- 
lege because since the founding of 
Elon that institution has offered its 
facilities to the Convention and its 
various interests. When the Conven- 
tion was incorporated, Elon was listed 
as the principal office of The Southern 
Convention, Inc. The College has 
given freely of its facilities to the 
Convention to make it possible for our 
churches to have a center for the ad- 
ministrative offices of the Convention. 
For many years Dr. J. 0. Atkinson 
maintained his office as Mission Sec- 
retary at Elon, and The Christian 
Sun has been edited at Elon College 
for many years of its existence. At 
the present time Elon College makes 
available to The Southern Conven- 
tion three splendid offices. This makes 
it possible for the bookkeeper, treas- 
urer and Superintendent to have 
clean, warm and light offices in which 
to do their work. The college does 
this without charge to the Conven- 
tion. The college not only furnishes 
offices, lights, heat and janitor serv- 
ice, but the college is always gen- 
erous in other services which it can 
render to the Convention. It is dif- 
ficult to see how the Convention could 
manage to maintain its offices were it 
not for the generosity of Elon College. 

The motive back of making avail- 
able offices for the Convention head- 
quarters is the fact that Elon College 
and its president recognize that the 
college is a vital part of the Conven- 
tion. Elon has supplied ministerial 
leadership for most of our churches 
throughout the years. It has in- 
spired and made it possible for us to 
have a church consciousness and to 
have a trained lay leadership. The 
Convention is under great obligation 
to Elon and we are happy to pay our 
tribute to this splendid institution of 
ours. We urge our people to recog- 
nize the vital place which Elon has in 
the life of the Southern Convention 
and urge the generous support fi- 
nancially of the institution. Not only 
should we support Elon with our 
finances, but we should send our boys 
and girls to this, our institution, that 



they may be trained by a Christian 
faculty to take their places in their 
chosen life's work. 



ELON COLLEGE AND THE BOARD OF 
CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. 

By Jesse H. Dollar, Chairman, 
Board of Christian Education. 
Southern Convention. 

Elon has, for fifty-nine years, been 
the spring-board for the program of 
Christian Education for the churches 
of the Southern Convention. Through 
her influence, ministers have been 
sent out to man the churches of the 
Convention — and far beyond its 
bounds. Thousands of young people 
have come in from the churches to re- 
ceive instruction and inspiration and 
have gone back to take their places in 
the local churches as church officers, 
Sunday school teachers and leaders. 
The contribution our college has made 
to the progress of the churches of our 
fellowship is immeasurable. 

The Board of Christian Education, 
of the Southern Convention of Con- 
gregational Christian Churches, is 
charged by the Convention with de- 
veloping plans for Daily Vacation 
Bible Schools, Young People's Camps 
and Conferences, Leadership Train- 
ing Courses, departmental emphases 
and institutional and missionary ed- 
ucation. For many years Elon Col- 
lege has given space on its program 
and facilities for taking care and en- 
couraging many conferences, not only 
for young people, but for smaller 
groups of church people and leaders 
(Continued on page 11.) 



The Christian Sun 

Established 1844 by Rev. Daniel W. Kerr. 

A Religious Weekly for the Home, devoted 
to the interests of the Kingdom as represent- 
ed by the Congregational Christian Churches. 
Our Principles. 

1. The Lord Jesus Christ is the only 
Head of the Church. 

2. Christian is a sufficient name for the 
Church. 

3. The Bible is a sufficient rule of faith 
and practice. 

4. Christian character is a sufficient test 
of fellowship and Church membership. 

5. The right of private judgment and the 
liberty of conscience is a right and a privi- 
lege that should be accorded to and exer- 
cised by all. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor Robert Lee House 

Managing Editor John T. Kernodle 

Associate Editors — J. B. Allen, H. G. Coun- 
cil Jr., J. H. Dollar, F. B. Eutsler, S. C. 
Harrell, R. M. Kimball, B. V. Munger, 
J. E. Neese, W. W. Sloan, H. S. Smith. 
Corresponding Editors — J. F. Apple (E. N. 
C), W. M. Stevens (N. C. & Va.), F. C. 
Lester (W. N. C), J. G. Truitt (E. Va.), 
R. A. Whitten (V. Va.). 
Departmental Editors — Wm. T. Scott, Con- 
vention ; Mrs. W. J. Andes, Women's 
Work; Miss Elizabeth Chicoine, Young 
People's Work; Mrs. R. L. House, Chil- 
dren; L. E. Smith, Christian Education; 
Clias. D. Johnston, Orphanage; H. S. 
Hardcastle, Sunday School. 
Board of Publications — W. J. Andes, S. E. 
Madren, W. M. Stevens, W. E. Wisseman, 
T. F. Wright. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Six Months $1.00 

One Year $2.00 

Published by the Board of Publications, 
agent for the Southern Convention of Con- 
gregational Christian Churches, and printed 
every Thursday except the last in June and 
December by the Central Publishing Co., 
Inc., Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Post 
Office at Richmond, Va., July 25, 1922, un- 
der Act of March 3, 1879. 

Remittances for subscriptions should be sent 
to the Convention Office, Elon College, 
N. C. 

All other matters of business should be ad- 
dressed to The Christian Sun, 1536 East 
Broad Street, Richmond, 19, Va. 

Contributions should reach the editor at 
S20G Grove Avenue, Richmond, 21, Va 



The Christian Sun Subscription Blank 

FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 
FIFTY ISSUES FOR $2.00 

Dr. Wm. T. Scott 
Elon College, N. C. 

Enclosed find $ for which please send The Christian 

Sun for one year to 

Address 

Name 

t ] New [ ] Renewal 



Page Four. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 27, 1949. 




'S J^jXSSAGE, 



PARTNERSHIP IN HIGHER EDUCATION. 

For nearly three score years the people of the South- 
ern Convention have been cooperating in a major enter- 
prise, the -support and conduct of a Christian college. 
With unflagging zeal and unfailing faith a loyal but 
limited constituency has promoted and maintained Elon 
College. Its early and arduous days developed the 
stamina of those who shouldered this joint educational 
responsibility. We need not survey all the historical 
landmarks, but note that this cooperative enterprise has 
yielded demonstrable results in the fields of education 
and religion, in pulpit and pew, in church and state. 

Who among us is not interested in contemporary 
education, in maintaining contact with first-rate minds, 
with making available the primary sources of knowl- 
edge, with the preservation and transmission of culture ? 
We cannot afford to go ahead with our intellectual 
blinders on. We have seen the abyss before us in the 
example of the Nazis and we are not sure that "It can't 
happen here." 

In such a time in such a world Christian colleges, 
no less Christian churches, must assume leadership. We 
as a people must exercise our intellectual as well as fi- 
nancial stewardship. Christian colleges may not be the 
lump of the educational world, but they may be the 
leaven in our civilization. Here then is an opportunity 
which should not be by-passed. If we as a great com- 
munion in the most influential nation in the world are 
to measure up to the challenge of these years of oppor- 
tunity we must utilize to the full every worthy institu- 
tion which the churches have fashioned to extend their 
work. 

There are homes which no longer have financial 
responsibility for the children, but salary continues. Re- 
member the government says that 15 per cent of your 
income is not too much to give to worthy causes. Now 
while so many veterans are in college would be an 
appropriate time for numbers of people to erect suitable 
memorials to sons or brothers lost in the war. 

Many people have had a part in our educational 
project at Elon. Many lives have been touched by its 
enlightening influence. All of us may share in its 
ongoing and expanding program. Join heartily in this 
exalted partnership. 



COLLEGE MAN? 



"Are you a college man?" One replies noncha- 
lantly and unimaginatively, "Nope, never went to col- 
lege — didn't even finish high school." For the same 
reason, and the additional reason that he has no children, 
that is to say no children he expects to send to college, 
at least to any particular college — this man never makes 
any voluntary contribution to appeals from Christian 
colleges for support. 




"Are you a college man?" Another replies with 
feeling and discernment: "Yes, I am a college man. 
It is true that I never attended college personally, but 
I am definitely a college man. My wife, from whom 
I have learned so much and to whom I am eternally 
indebted, is a college graduate. I read books, papers and 
magazines written by college-bred men. I am min- 
istered to daily by men of high responsibility in profes- 
sional and industrial circles who are academically 
trained. Yes, I am a college man." 

"Moreover," this gentleman adds, "I sit regularly 
at the feet of a minister who is a college graduate and 
want my church to have college men in its pulpit for 
years to come. College trained and inspired people 
write regularly for my church paper. Therefore, I am 
not simply a college man. I am a Christian college man. 
I want my children to go to college, but not just to any 
college, I prefer they attend a Christian college." 

Here then, is a college man in the finest sense. He 
realizes that colleges, like the Almighty, rain their bless- 
ings down upon the just and the unjust. He will not 
willingly be deprived of a share in this great interprise. 
The support of a Christian college is a cheerfully accept- 
ed part of his life's stewardship. He is consciously and 
gladly a college man. May his tribe increase! 



ACCEPT AND ATTEMPT YOUR 
APPORTIONMENT. 

Did you study those apportionment tables in our 
last issue? In all probability there were various and 
mingled reactions. Now is the time, if it has not been 
done already — to tackle the problem of an increased ap- 
portionment. Naturally the easiest thing to do is to 
throw up one's hands, admit defeat and make no heroic 
effort to raise it. 

The minister will have a difficult time persuading 
a reluctant finance committee or an indifferent church, 
but great things can be done when pastor and people 
work together in faith toward a common objective. 
By using the "Cent-A-Meal" offering during Lent, by 
enlisting the aid of Sunday School and Church organiza- 
tions, by presenting the full scope of our Christian 
World Mission, be developing a church-wide program of 
Christian stewardship, every church in the Convention 
should enjoy the fruits of victory. Accept and attempt 
your apportionment now! 



The worthwhileness of one's work is a standard of 
value of judgment that every thoughtful toiler should 
consider as well as the pay envelope and the shortness 
of hours. The products of some labor of millions of 
people debase instead of exalt. Workers should ask 
themselves the perturbing, evaluating question whether 
the products which they have had a small or large share 
in making build or destroy. — C. E. Wagner. 



January 27, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Five. 



Veterans As Students 

By James R. Hailey. 



Our nation points with pride to 
the splendid job the boys did in bring- 
ing the war to a successful conclu- 
sion. But the attention does not end 
with the cessation of the conflict, but 
is focused on what the veterans are 
doing now, how they are adjusting 
themselves to civilian life after those 
gruelling days in the military serv- 
ice, and whether that experience has 
been helpful or harmful to them. 

As we mingle among the students 
here at Blon, it is difficult to single 
out the veterans as "different" peo- 



definitely how people should not have 
to live, they have buckled down with 
earnestness to prepare themselves for 
the role of contributing something to 
the progress of civilization and the 
relief of mankind. 

With a strange purpose and de- 
termination they bridged the gap and 
entered college. Some have found it 
difficult to pick up where they left 
off, especially those Avho are past the 
thirty mark, and who perhaps did 
not originally plan to attend college 
at all. But the experience that caused 



We find the veterans as a rule very 
alert, with a keen interest in current 
events, Avorld affairs, geography, trav- 
el, politics, and foreign policy. It is 
sometimes surprising to find what a 
keen insight they have in affairs of 
government, the trends of the times, 
and our general social ills. Many of 
them have had rich experiences, how- 
ever regrettable, which have served to 
give them a better understanding of 
life. While they do not talk much 
about war experiences, these experi- 
ences are an integral part of their 
education and help them in compre- 
hending a broader outlook. Their 
travel experiences have helped them 
to understand better the cultures of 



AIR VIEW OF VETERANS APARTMENTS. 



pie. Perhaps we can say we expect to 
find them a little older than the stu- 
dents fresh from the high schools. 
They display a little more poise and 
confidence in going about their tasks 
and meeting new situations because 
of their previous experience. Two, 
three, four, or five years out of a 
man's life devoted to military service 
is quite a slice, and naturally we ex- 
pect him to be a little more mature. 

The experience of war makes an in- 
delible impression on the participants. 
Some came out apparently unscathed, 
but none escaped the searching ques- 
tion, "What were we fighting for?" 
At least that started the boys think- 
ing. There mus be a purpose in life. 
Yes, it is our responsibility to see that 
the world must be made a better place 
in which to live. After experiencing 



them to make this decision somehow 
made them strong enough to keep 
working sufficiently hard to do gen- 
erally better work than the non-vet- 
eran students. What they lack in 
agility, they compensate for in sheer 
plugging. 

The first wave of veterans to enter 
school after the war, with the horrors 
still vivid in their consciousness, went 
about their studies with a more fever- 
ish pace than those entering now. 
The need for the alleviation of the 
world's suffering seemed more urgent 
to them, and they consequently pur- 
sued their goals with more intense ef- 
fort. Most of the veterans today 
have readjusted themselves and have 
settled down to a more normal pace. 
Their attitudes are favorable and 
conducive to higher learning. 



the world, and to see more clearly the 
part our country is to play in helping 
mankind. 

We were proud of the job they did, 
and now we can be just as proud of 
the course they are taking in better 
preparing themselves for their places 
in life. It speaks well for the calibre 
of these boys who would not let ad- 
versity spoil them, but use all of those 
dismal experiences as stepping stones 
to higher education, higher achieve- 
ment, and higher goals. 

You will find in them a disposition 
to be pretty independent in their 
thinking. They have had to rely on 
quick decisions, and many of them. 
That practice has developed in them 
a sense of confidence, though they are 
generally unassuming in their atti- 
( Continued on page 13.) 



Page Six. THE CHRISTIAN SUN 

CONTRIBUTIONS I 



SUFFOLK LETTER. 

The class of nearly forty seventh- 
grade boys and girls had come quietly 
into the library, taken their seats 
about the brightly polished tables, and 
were going about their accustomed 
business of selecting books, returning 
books, and doing bits of research as- 
signments under the direction of the 
librarian and the teacher of that 
grade and class. Now when the bulk 
of the borrowing had been done, and 
activity had slowed down to quietude 
about the tables the librarian quietly 
suggested to their teacher that it 
might be informative and pleasant to 
have her turn on the radio and let the 
pupils hear the inauguration of the 
President of the United States. The 
teacher readily agreed, and it was an- 
nounced to the class, and pronto there 
was the voice from Washington. 

The boys and girls were all atten- 
tion. It was just at that moment 
when last minutes were ticking off 
before the Rev, Dr. Pruden led the 
opening prayer. The children were 
quiet. The librarian could ' ' feel ' ' the 
signs of reverence, although no one 
had suggested being quiet or reverent. 
By the time the prayer was over al- 
most every head was bowed. Fol- 
lowed, as you know the oath by Vice- 
President Barkley, then the prayer 
by the Rabbi. It was during this 
prayer that the "notice" gong rang 
out in the building for noon recess, 
but not a boy or girl moved. It re- 
mained significantly quiet. Before 
the prayer ended the supreme test 
of their reverence and quietude came, 
because the second bell rang, and all 
the other classes began to pour into 
the halls and corridors, but not one 
child lifted his bowed head, nor 
moved. There was perfect reverence 
and quiet, and when they finally left 
the room there was an unusual order- 
liness in their going. 

It was an inspiring moment. There 
they were seventh graders in a hust- 
ling, head-on atmosphere, but the line 
of reverence held ! Those boys and 
girls showed that they were the right 
sort of youth, and that they, of their 
own accord, without any instructions 
from the elders, knew to be in the 
spirit of reverence — and who can say 
that their brave little hearts were not 
beating heavenward one of earth's 
best prayers. I wish to register my 
congratulations to their teachers, their 



school, their homes, and their churches 
and synagogues, for a small number 
of them were Jews. They were a lit- 
tle section of united America, joining 
with the voice of prayer without 
thought as to wether it was Protes- 
tant, Catholic, or Jew. 

And what is more I have heard 
nothing about it on the streets, nor 
have I heard it in conversation, ex- 
cept as it happened to be told to me. 
By which I mean to say it did not 
occur to the seventh graders that they 
had done anything unusual. It was 
right, and proper, and that was that. 
As to me I feel like singing "God 
Bless America," and bless America's 
noble public school teachers, and their 
pupils and the homes from which they 
come. And Gk>d bless the churches, 
the Sunday schools, and the citizens 
of this goodly land as we seek to keep 
the channels of freedom and right- 
eousness open to all. 

John G. Truitt. 



OUR CHURCH COLLEGES. 

The Congregational and Christian 
Churches from the beginning of their 
rise in America have been concerned 
about Christian education, prompted 
by the conviction that the welfare of 
individuals and the nation depended 
in large measure upon a trained min- 
istry and laity. As a part of the de- 
veloping of higher education in Amer- 
ica, it is significant that of the first 
280 colleges established in this nation 
only seventeen were state institutions. 
The Congregationalists, beginning 
with the establishment of Harvard 
College in 1636 and Yale in 1701, hav- 
ing been responsible for the founding 
of more than forty colleges including 
the two above mentioned, Dartmouth, 
Williams, Bowdoin, Middlebury, Am- 
herst, Mt. Holyoke, Wellesley, Smith, 
Oberlin, Pomona, Carleton, and oth- 
ers. Consequently as the nation ex- 
panded westward and southward, 
Congregational men, women, teach- 
ers, and ministers were everywhere 
present and leading. 

Likewise, the Christian Church was 
concerned with and took action for 
the establishment of higher education- 
al institutions. Under the leadership 
of Horace Mann, Antioch was estab- 
lished in Ohio in 1852, the first col- 
lege in America to admit women for 
graduation on the same basis as men. 



January 27, 1949. 

The Christian Church also established 
colleges in Missouri, Kansas, Ohio, 
and in other states. 

In the field of higher education in 
the Southern Convention, the Chris- 
tian Church's major contribution has 
been Elon College, though the Con- 
vention also founded Bethlehem Col- 
lege (now Southern Union Junior 
College) in Wadley, Alabama, in 
1923. 

The majority of ministers of the 
Southern Convention have been 
trained at Elon College, and many of 
the lay leadership of the area have 
likewise received their training at this 
institution. 

Prior to the founding of Elon Col- 
lege, the leaders of the churches of 
the South evidenced 'their interest in 
education by encouraging young men 
preparing for the ministry and assist- 
ing them financially. Also some of the 
ministers maintained academies and 
normal schools, notably Rev. Daniel 
W. Kerr, founder of The Christian 
Sun, who established in 1826 in Wake 
County, North Carolina, The Wake, 
Forest-Pleasant Grove Academy and 
in 1838 Mt. Pleasant Acamey, and 
later Junto Academy, Orange County, 
North Carolina. Rev. W. B. Wellons 
founded Suffolk Collegiate Institute, 
Suffolk, Virginia, in 1872, where Dr. 
W. W. S'taley taught a course particu- 
larly for young ministers. In 1865, 
Graham Normal School was ' estab- 
lished at Graham, North Carolina. 
These specific efforts to promote high- 
er education by the church were fore- 
runners of Elon College which was 
established by the Southern Conven- 
tion and Avhich opened its doors on 
September 2, 1890. 

Elon College since its founding has 
been the center of the life and de- 
velopment of our churches of the 
South, and today the churches are 
depending upon Elon to train its min- 
istry and to promote higher education 
for the laity on a Christian level. 
The college in 1948-49 has an enroll- 
ment of approximately 800 students 
and a faculty of approximately 50. 
Physical properties are valued at over 
a million dollars and the college has 
an endowment of approximately four 
hundred thousand ($400,000) dollars. 

There are in the Congregational 
Christian fellowship 17 colleges serv- 
ing the general church and which have 
more or less direct affiliation with the 
denomination : B e 1 o i t, Wisconsin ; 
Carleton, Minnesota; Defiance, Ohio; 
Doane, Nebraska; Drury, Missouri; 
Elon, North Carolina ; Grinnell, Iowa • 
(Continued on page 13.) 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Seven. 




ELON INAUGURATES A BROADER 
PROGRAM OF EDUCATION. 

By President L. E. Smith. 

Extra-curricular courses when 
properly planned and directed often 
make considerable contributions to 
students enrolled in college. Aside 
from the usual campus activities and 
extra-curricular privileges, Elon is in- 
augurating three definite courses of 
instruction for the enjoyment and the 
improvement of students and others 
in nearby communities who are in- 
terested in improving themselves. 

We have arranged a lyceum course 
and engaged artists of wide reputation 
whose performances are sought by 
larger communities and leading edu- 
cational institutions throughout the 
country. Appearing on the lyceum 
course this year are : Norman Cor- 
don, Metropolitan Opera Company; 
Mercel Duprez, French organ virtu- 
oso, one of the foremost living or- 
ganists; Barter Players, theatrical 
troup from Abingdon, Va. ; Touring 
Players, theatrical troup from New 
York City; Betty Smith of Chapel 
Hill and New York, author of A Tree 
Grows in Brooklyn and Tomorrow 
Will Be Better; Semas MacManus, 
Irish poet and historian of Interna- 
tional reputation, and others. These 
artists are attracting attention and 
adding greatly to the student and 
community life of the college. 

Sunday, January 23, at 11 :00 a. m., 
the Christian Workers' Conference 
opened with a sermon by Dr. Rock- 
well Harmon Potter, Hartford, Conn. 
Dr. Potter is well known in church 
circles of all denominations and is a 
profound scholar, preacher and lec- 
turer of note. Dr. Potter addressed 
the students and members of the con- 
ference, speaking from the standpoint 
of the Gospel ministry and with par- 
ticular reference to the problems of 
the pastorate. 

Dr. Allan S. Meek, president of the 
Theological Seminary of the E. & 11. 
Church, Lancaster, Pa., addressed the 
conference on Evangelism, instructing 
those present as to the responsibilities 
and privileges of the local minister 
and the layman as an Evangelist in 
their home churches. 

Dr. Howell D. Davies, specialist in 
Christian Stewardship and Modern 



Churchmanship, endeavored to guide 
the ones present in their approaches 
to the question of stewardship and 
the problems of the stewardship of 
life in general and the financial prob- 
lems of the church in particular. Dr. 
Davies addressed the conference on 
Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. 

Dr. Elbert Conover, an inter-de- 
nominational spirit and a specialist in 
church architecture and planning, ad- 
dressed the members of the confer- 
ence and students on the problems of 
planning and constructing houses of 



were fortunate in having such a large 
number of the members of the Mer- 
chants Association present for this 
service. 

The conference, as a whole, meant 
much to delegates and visitors. It was 
also an inspiration to faculty mem- 
bers and students. 

A course of Adult Education is be- 
ing inaugurated at Elon. This is an- 
other effort to offer to the general 
public the many fine facilities that 
are for the cultural and intellectual 
advancement of men and women of all 
ages. Weekly classes will be offered 
in the afternoons and evenings. Prac- 
tically the entire curriculum now be- 
ing taught in the college with new 
courses added will be offered to those 
enrolled in the school for adults. No 
course will be offered unless there is 




THE FULL TIME LIBRARY STAFF 
Left to Right: Miss Arabella Gore, Cataloguer; Mrs. Oma U. Johnson, Librarian; 
Mrs. Winnie C. Howell, Assistant Librarian. 



worship in keeping with and adapt- 
able to the Christian religion. 

Dr. Sylvester Green, minister, edu- 
cator, lecturer, and editor of the Dur- 
ham Herald-Sun;, spoke to the con- 
ference in general and to the ministers 
in particular about publicizing the 
Christian Gospel, calling attention to 
the fact that the pastor plays an im- 
portant part, in that the news of his 
church and of his message must come 
through him to the press. No editor 
can handle news concerning which he 
knows nothing. With proper co- 
operation, the newspaper may be of 
great assistance to any pastor. 

The conference closed with an ad- 
dress by Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, 
pastor of the Marble Collegiate 
Church, New York City. Dr. Peale 
came under the auspices of the Bur- 
lington Chamber of Commerce. We 



a minimum of ten applicants. The 
regular faculty will constitute the fac- 
ulty for the adult school with possi- 
bly some additions. Registration will 
begin Friday, February 5 at 7 p. m 
Classes will begin in the afternoon of 
February 7. Considerable interest 
is being manifested in this recent ad- 
venture in this field of education. A 
good enrollment is anticipated. 

The faculty holds itself in readi- 
ness to answer invitations on the part 
of the local church or groups of 
churches to assist in leadership train- 
ing schools in different sections of the 
Convention. Elon is responsible for 
the conduct of the College and of the 
instruction of those who are enrolled 
as students. It is also interested in 
the needs of our churches and the 
communities wherever it is possible 
to serve. 



Page Eight. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 27, 1949. 



Department of Physical Education 

By J L. Pierce, Professor of Physical Education. 



For many years I have felt that the 
small church-related colleges have 
been making a distinct contribution 
to physical education and recreation 
in the South, particularly, in North 
Carolina and Virginia. I have no 
statistics to back me up but from my 
observations, I believe that the ma- 
jority of the high school coaches, 
physical education teachers, and rec- 
reation workers have received their 
training at the smaller church-related 
colleges During the period just prior 



coaches. The people in the fields of 
athletics, recreation, and physical ed- 
ucation, have an opportunity to train 
and develop the boy and girl in ac- 
tivities that are naturally interesting, 
that have an element of competition 
at all levels, and which offer greater 
opportunity for teaching, self-con- 
trol, cooperation (team play), hon- 
esty, adherence to the rules, etc., than 
any other phase of education. 

Elon has and is still making its 
contribution to physical education 




GROUND-BREAKING CEREMONY FOR NEW GYMNASIUM. 



to the last war, however, the State 
Teachers Colleges greatly emphasized 
this phase of their training. 

Since the war most of the church- 
related colleges have seen the impor- 
tance of increasing and improving 
their departments of physical educa- 
tion. This was caused by a growing 
demand for teachers of physical edu- 
cation and coaches who have had 
training in physical education One 
reason for this increased emphasis is 
the fact that the school patrons, school 
administrators and church leaders 
have come to realize the importance of 
physical education, athletics and rec- 
reation in the process of education, 
and in our national life. Our churches 
are awakening to the fact that recre- 
ation is a valuable means of promot- 
ing religious education and develop- 
ing Christian living For many years 
some of our better educators have felt 
that the best job of teaching has been 
done by our high school athletic 



and recreation in the sections of the 
country from which it draws its stu- 
dents. Many of our older graduates 
are continuing to make their contri- 
butions directly while others are mak- 
ing theirs indirectly through admin- 
istrative positions and as parents and 
citizens. A man seldom remains many 
years in the field of physical education 
as a teacher because it is easy for him 
to advance into allied fields which pay 
a much larger salary. Ordinarily, a 
person who has the personality, ener- 
gy, enthusiasm, and character, which 
it takes to do a good job in physical 
education, will have many opportuni- 
ties to become a school administra- 
tor, a personnel director, or go into 
business in some capacity I could 
cite a dozen examples of each. When 
the armed forces were looking for men 
to be commissioned as officers, they 
were particularly interested in those 
who had had coaching and athletic ex- 
perience because these men had dem- 



onstrated leadership ability. A good 
example of this is that of Wade Mar- 
lette, Elon graduate of 1923, who had 
a wonderful record as a coach and 
physical educator and made a dis- 
tinct contribution to the war effort. 
Marlette entered the furniture busi- 
ness when he returned from his mili- 
tary service. 

Many of our former students have 
served many years as coaches and 
teachers, both in high schools and col- 
leges, and after they have gained ex- 
perience have moved up into more re- 
sponsible administrative and super- 
visory positions. These are too nu- 
merous to list but I think it is of in- 
terest to name some of these with their 
present positions They are : 

John L. Cameron, Haleigh, N 0- — 
Advisor for Health and Physical Ed- 
ucation, State Department of Public 
Instruction. 

L. J. " Hap ' ' Perry — Executive 
Secretary of the North Carolina High 
School Athletic Associations with of- 
fices in Chapel, N C. Prior to taking 
this position, ' ' Hap ' ' was Director of 
Athletics and head coach at his Alma 
Mater, and before that, football coach 
and Superintendent of Schools in 
Reidsville, N. C 

Elby S. Johnson, Washington, N. 
C. — Superintendent of schools and di- 
rector and owner of a private camp 
for boys. 

William Joseph Story, Norfolk, Va. 
— Assistant High School Principal 
and former head coach of Davidson 
College. 

Paul G. Hook, Clifton Forge, Va.— 
Superintendent of Schools; owner of 
boys and girls camp. 

Some of our men who have estab- 
lished names for themselves in the 
field of athletics and physical educa- 
tion are : 

John L. Beaver, Hargrave Military 
Academy, Dry Forks, Va. — Director 
of Athletics and Coach. 

Gordon A. Kirkland, Catawba Col- 
lege, Salisbury, N. C. — Director of 
Athletics and Head Coach 

D. C. Walker, Wake Forest, N. O— 
Head Football Coach. "Peahead" 
completed his college degree while 
serving as head coach at Elon. 

Wendell E. Beattie, Cedarville Col- 
lege, Cedarville, Ohio. — Director of 
Athletics and Dean of Men. 

It is interesting to note that during 
the 1947 football season four of the 
coaches of the major colleges in North 
Carolina were Elon College gradu- 
ates. These were: "Bill" Story at 
Davidson, "Hap" Perry at Elon, 
(Continued on page 13.) 



January 27, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Nine. 



Religion Majors at Elon College 

&y Ferris E. Reynolds, Ph. D., Professor of Religion. 



The*effectiveness of the program for 
religion in the post-war world will 
depend largely upon the supply of 
fresh leadership together with the 
calibre, training, and measure of pro- 
phetic insight of these new recruits. 
That statement might be made by al- 
most any thoughtful person in our 
churches. Who would challenge the 
truth of it? To observe a sequence of 
facts, however, and draw a valid con- 
clusion from them does not go far 
enough. If modern science has taught 
us anything, it is that even a true 
judgment is not an end in itself. To 
be significant, a true judgment must 
become the basis of intelligent action 
and control. The recognized need 
for competent Christian leadership 
in our day raises this question : How 
is our society to produce this leader- 
ship which the post-war world needs ? 
Certainly this question concerns all 
thinking persons. It is a special chal- 
lenge to the church-related institu- 
tions of higher education. 

Whence are these religious leaders 
to come ? The plain answer is : From 
among our young people upon whom 
God has laid His hand and urged to- 
ward that vocation. Some experience 
of personal commitment is the start- 
ing point for a career of genuine 
Christian leadership. To attempt to 
force this experience into any stan- 
dard pattern or to condition it upon 
any pre-established emotional expres- 
sions is surely presumptuous. Who 
woidd dare to specify how the Al- 
mighty should accomplish His pur- 
poses, or what earthen vessels He 
might use in recruiting the ranks of 
His servants? To assume, however, 
that He will take care of the matter 
without any effort or concern on our 
part may be more of pious neglect 
than Christian faith. Observe the 
number of cases in which God has 
used someone who cared to enlist 
new reapers for His harvest. What 
greater honor could one receive than 
that of being appointed the divine 
agent to suggest to a young person 
that he consider seriously a Christian 
leadership vocation ? 

Again, there is no set schedule in 
which this commitment must take 
place. Some of our strongest leaders 
have begun their careers rather late 
in life. The most natural time to 
confront young people with religious 
service as a life's vocation is during 
high school and early college years. 
But care should be taken to show how 



varied and extensive the fields of 
Christian service are. In our day, it 
is a mistake certainly to assume that 
the preaching ministry, missions, and 
religious education are the only areas 
in which a young person can devote 
his life to religious leadership. One 
of the reasons for the shortage of men 
in the preaching ministry is that so 
many trained religious leaders have 
found their Christian vocation in so- 
cial work, counseling, the work of 
chaplains, and other such highly sig- 
nificant areas. Indications are that 
the opportunities for full-time relig- 
ious work in these newer fields will 
continue to increase even more rapid- 
ly in the future, and that the demand 




DR. FERRIS E. REYNOLDS. 

for trained personnel will be doubled 
many times oA^er. This vast extension 
of the areas in which trained religious 
leadership is sought and used allows 
for a proportional extension of the 
types of natural gifts and interests 
which may find employment in Chris- 
tian life-vocations. Why not suggest 
many of these to our young people at 
the time when they are making their 
vocational choices? Here then, is 
where our religion majors actually be- 
gin their careers. Here is where our 
program of training wins or loses its 
first decisive contest with secular and 
material interests. It is in our homes, 
and in our local churches even more 
than on our college campuses that 
these primary decisions are made. If 
Ave fail in the matter of securing these 
personal commitments to Christian 
life-vocations how can we escape fail- 
ure all along the line ? 

Following the personal commitment 
comes the basic training for Chris- 
tian service. Those who enter Elon 
for this training are enrolled as re- 
ligious majors. At the present time 
they number forty - four — fourteen 
young women and thirty young men. 
Some of them plan to enter the 



preaching ministry, others look to- 
ward careers in religious education, 
missions, or teaching. Some have not 
determined which of the various fields 
they wish to enter. In planning a 
program of study for these students 
the controversial question is raised : 
Should the religion major devote any 
considerable portion of his undergrad- 
uate studies to religion ? Or, is it bet- 
ter for the student who plans to enter 
a religious vocation to spend his en- 
tire four years in college pursuing a 
broad cultural education and to de- 
fer the study of religious subjects for 
graduate study ? Much may be said 
on both sides of the question. 

Certainly a young person's inter- 
est in the field of religion calls for 
some cultivation during the four 
years of college life. Knowledge sus- 
tains and deepens interest. To omit 
every academic pursuit of religious 
knowledge diiring the time a young 
person is gaining the knowledge in 
science, economics, sociology, and oth- 
er fields would seem to place undue 
strain upon the person's commitment 
to religious service. It may be too 
much to suppose that the religious 
interpretations of high school days 
should be adequate for college experi- 
ences. Further, religious ideas, be- 
liefs, and convictions grow with the 
growth of personality and experience. 
It would seem wise, therefore, to in- 
clude some courses in religion within 
the plan of studies for religious ma- 
jors at the college. 

Can the objections to undergradu- 
ate specialization in religion be met? 
In arranging the program of studies 
for our religion majors, we feel that 
we do avoid, to a large extent, the 
valid objections to undergraduate spe- 
cialization in religion. The courses 
in religion are broad and basic in 
their scope. Each student is coun- 
seled with respect to his plans, his 
special needs and capacities. The 
purpose of preparing students for 
graduate study is zealously adhered 
to in drafting programs. Members of 
the faculty of the department of re- 
ligion being seminary graduates are 
especially fitted to do this. Courses 
in Greek, German, philosophy, sci- 
ence, literature, and comparative re- 
ligions constitute much of this basic 
training for graduate studies in re- 
ligion. The Bible courses that are 
offered are held to the non-profes- 
sional level so as to avoid duplicating 
the work of professional schools. 

In this manner the majors in relig- 
ion at Elon are prepared to carry out 
their plans to enter a vocation of 
(Continued on page 13.) 



Page Ten. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 27, 1949. 



THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

By Fletcher Moore, 
Professor of Music. 

The Department of Music at Elon 
has always been one of the outstand- 
ing schools of music in the State of 
North Carolina. Its graduates have 
everywhere been accepted for, and 
have proved successful in, positions of 
responsibility in teaching and per- 
forming in many sections of the 
country. In entrance and placement 
examinations given graduate students 
in leading universities, Elon music 
graduates have been among the high- 
est scorers. Elon may well be proud 
of the achievements of its music grad- 
uates and of its contribution, through 
them, to the cause of better music. 

Elon is a church institution and as 
such has the responsibility and op- 
portunity not given to a non-church 
school for furthering the cause of 
good sacred music. The college has 
met this challenge by promoting one 
of the outstanding choirs in the South 
■ — a choir which provides the best of 
religious music for the Elon Commun- 
ity Church, as well as for a wide- 
spread audience which hears it on its 
radio program every Sunday after- 
noon, and on annual tours extending 
from North Carolina and Virginia to 
New England These activities of the 
choir bring the best music to the 
choir's audiences both at Elon and 
elsewhere, and provide a wealth of 
experience for young people who in 
turn will go out and use this experi- 
ence in contributing to good stan- 
dards of church music in their own 
localities. 

In many other ways also does Elon 
contribute to the cause of good mu- 
sic It offers courses in applied music, 
church music, and music appreciation 
to any student in the college at large. 
It presents an outstanding concert 
series given by top-ranking artists, 
these programs being open to all aca- 
demic students. One notable feature 
of these concerts is the fact that for 
the second successive year Elon stu- 
dents will be soloists with the North 
Carolina. Symphony when it appears 
at Elon. Furthermore, for several 
years Elon has made available its fa- 
cilities for the spring student mu- 
sicians' contests for this state spon- 
sored by the National Federation of 
Music Clubs, with Elon faculty mem- 
bers serving as state contest chairman. 

These, as well as many others, are 
the types of contributions that Elon 
College makes to good music. It is to 
be hoped that these contributions may 
continue and become even more valu- 
able as Elon goes forward. 



NATURAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT. 

By James Earl Danieley, 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

The Department of Natural Sci- 
ences of Elon College is an integral 
part of the curriculum. It embraces 
the work in biology, chemistry, ge- 
ology, home economics and physics. 
During the past five years, nearly one- 
fourth of the students graduated from 
Elon have majored in these subjects. 

Since the founding of the college 
sixty years ago, most of the students 
who have matriculated at Elon have 
taken one or more courses in the De- 
partment of Natural Sciences. Each 
graduate must have two years in 
mathematics, two years in natural 
science or one year of mathematics 
and one year of natural science. This 
means that many students taking the 
introductory work in the Department 
are sudents who are graduated with 
majors in other fields. In addition to 
the first year courses in each special 
field, the Department offers a survey 
of the physical sciences. This course 
has proven very popular in recent 
years, probably because it gives a 
survey foundation for the student 
who otherwise would not have the op- 
portunity to study the sciences. 

Throughout the years, it has been 
apparent that a majority of the sci- 
ence majors were preparing them- 
selves for medicine and dentistry. 
During the past fifteen years, we have 
sent approximately sixty students in- 
to these fields, in addition to a large 
number who have gone into nursing 
and the field of medical technology. 

During these fifteen years, approx- 
imately twenty-five of our graduates 
have gone into the universities to 
study further in their chosen fields. 
Many others have gone into the teach- 
ing profession, both in secondary and 
higher education. Others have taken 
their places in industry after receiv- 
ing their education at Elon. These 
graduates have made and are making 
a real reputation for their Alma Ma- 
ter. Almost everywhere the reputa- 
tion of the Department is linked with 
the growth of the college and with the 
names of Christian scholars such as 
Dr. Ned F. Bran nock, present Chair- 
man of the Department and Professor 
Alonzo L. Hook, professor of physics, 
who have led, and continue to lead, in 
the growth and development of our 
program in this field. 

More and more the medical schools 
of the country are calling upon us to 
give to the pre-medical students a lib- 
eral arts education. It is this field in 
which Elon has excelled in the past, 
and it is in this field that we will con- 



ADULT EDUCATION. 

By W. W. Sloan, Professor of 
Bible and Religious Literature. 

Elon is expanding its service to peo- 
ple living within forty or fifty miles 
of the college. Late afternoon and 
night classes for adults and young 
people who are not regular college 
students will start February 7. 

Recognizing that more education 
means better living and better jobs, 
older people are asking that some ar- 
rangement be made whereby they may 
secure additional education. Elon 
College has the facilities for doing 
this. A committee has worked out a 
series of courses to be taught by reg- 
ular members of the college faculty 
in the college class rooms. 

Classes will be held from 4 :00 to 
5 :30 Monday and Thursday after- 
noons (or if preferred Tuesday and 
Thursday). Other casses will be held 
from 7 :30 to 9 :00 the same days. If 
a large group prefers classes once a 
week they will be held from 7 :00 
to 10 :00 Monday, Tuesday or Thurs- 
day nights. 

All classes will meet a total of three 
hours a week for twelve weeks. No 
examinations will be given, except to 
those who wish credit toward a college 
degree or teacher's certificate. Such 
people will be given two semester 
hours' credit for each course com- 
pleted. The cost of each course taken 
will be $20.00 plus books or other 
equipment bought. 

A variety of classes will be offered, 
in the fields of Bible, Business, Edu- 
cation, English, Home Economics, 
Modern Languages, Music, Psycholo- 
gy, Science, Sociology and Speech. 

Although the date for the begin- 
ning of these adult classes has been 
set as February 7, details as to just 
what classes will be taught and the 
hours will depend upon the wishes of 
those who expect to use this opportun- 
ity Elon is providing. Those who are 
interested are asked to Avrite the di- 
rector of adult education at Elon 
College, telling what classes they want 
and days and hours. A catalogue giv- 
ing details about the courses avail- 
able will be sent those who request it. 
Readers of The Christian Sun can 
be of service by telling their friends 
about these adult classes. 



tinue to do our utmost. We realize 
that the man who ministers to the 
physical needs of our bodies must also 
have some depth of insight into hu- 
man values if he is to minister effec- 
tively. It is this challenge which con- 
fronts us and to it we dedicate our- 
selves without reservation. 



January 27, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Eleven. 



RELIGIOUS LIFE ON THE CAMPUS 
OF ELON COLLEGE. 

By Rev. Clyde L. Fields. 

Is it possible for a young person 
to retain his religious faith in the 
face of modern education ? On every 
hand the assertion is made that vital 
religion and college education are 
antinomies. Some would point to 
an isolated example of a young person 
who, supposedly, lost his religious 
faith while a student in college. Here 
at E 1 o n, every spiritual resource 
known is utilized to conserve all the 
worth while religious faith of the 
student. In addition, opportunity is 
given for the student to profit from 
modern scholarship. 

The founders of Elon insisted that 
good education is not complete with- 
out some knowledge of our Christian 
religion. The college still believes 
this to be true, and the faculty and 
administration work with this goal 
in view. Because of this policy of 
the college, I entered to prepare my- 
self as a minister of the Gospel. 

Christian atmosphere is a good en- 
vironment in aiding the student in de- 
veloping into his highest potentiality. 
The Christian spirit becomes appar- 
ent from the moment a freshman ar- 
rives on the campus, for one of the 
first greetings comes from a student 
wearing a card with the letters S.C.A. 
on it. He soon learns that the letters 
mean Student Christian Association, 
one of the active groups on the campus 
for putting the message of Chris into 
action by the youth of the college. As 
the student becomes a part of the 
Student Christian Association, he 
learns that it is very much like the 
young people's group back home. 
Early in the college year the student 
is invited to become a member of the 
group. Forums, devotionals, discus- 
sions, plans, parties, games — these 
and other activities are a part of the 
work of the association in helping to 
develop character among the student 
body. Permeating all this activity is 
the desire of young people to apply 
the Christian faith to the needs of 
modern youth. Allow me to offer a 
personal thank you to the S.C.A. for 
the kind assistance given me to help 
find my balance when I arrived on 
the campus. 

"A good start makes a good end- 
ing" is one of the proverbs practiced 
by the students who attend Morning 
Watch. Just after breakfast, a group 
of students make their way to Whitley 
Chapel for a few minutes of morning 
meditation. Morning Watch, a short 
devotional service, seems to give the 



necessary impetus to make the day 
worthwhile. This service is conduct- 
ed by the students and the leadership 
is rotated to allow for training in lead- 
ing public worship. 

Evening Vespers, another devotion- 
al service at the close of the day 
brings together the experiences of the 
day and gives the sense of the abiding 
presence of God. Morning Watch 
and Evening Vespers are voluntary 
as to attendance, yet many feel drawn 
to these gatherings. 

Religious Chapel is held twice week- 
ly, bringing to the campus some of 
the outstanding pastors of the 
churches in the Piedmont area, as 
well as from other parts of the coun- 
try. All students are expected to at- 
tend Religious Chapel and are privi- 
leged to hear excellent speakers. These 
services are similar to the services in 
the local church. Music, hymns, 
prayer, devotional and inspirational 
messages, plus a feeling of kinship and 
fellowship pervades the Chapel Hour. 

All students are expected to take 
courses in the New and Old Testa- 
ments. The college has been fortu- 
nate through the years in having good 
men to work in the Department of Re- 
ligion. Dr. Ferris Reynolds now is 
head of this department, assisted by 
Dr. W. W. Sloan and Dean D. J. 
Bowden. All three of these men have 
served churches as pastors and are 
able to bring to the classes the benefit 
of vears of 6Xp6I*16nC6 aS teacher and 
pastor. My own life has been en- 
riched by the patient guidance and 
scholarly instruction of the members 
of the Department of Eeligion. 

The Elon College Community 
Church ministers to the student body 
and residents of the community in 
providing worship and instruction in 
church and Sunday school each Sun- 
day. Dr. Jesse Dollar, pastor of the 
church, is delighted to help the stu- 
dents in any way he can ; he is a 
friend to all the members of the stu- 
dent body. He is well qualified to 
counsel and advise on problems of 
students because of his twenty-five 
years of experience as a pastor. 

The Community Church offers Sun- 
day school classes for all ages, compe- 
tent teachers, a full time Director of 
Religious Education, the College 
Choir, other music, helpful and inspi- 
rational messages by the pastor- — all 
these with the hope that each Sunday 
will be a day of worship and fellow- 
ship with God for all the students, 
faculty and citizens of Elon. 

Many churches have periods of con- 
centrated spiritual emphasis called by 



various names, and Elon follows this 
practice. Each year some outstand- 
ing leader is brought to the campus 
for a week of concentrated spiritual 
emphasis. Services are held twice 
daily during this period. These ser- 
vices are similar to the church service 
in the local churches. Out of these 
periods of special emphasis comes 
new dedication to purpose and voca- 
tion for many, through the public 
services of worship and the clinics for 
all who desire private interviews. 

The Ministerial Association with 
Dr. Ferris Reynolds as faculty ad- 
viser, offers a workshop for the re- 
ligion majors. Future ministers, and 
full time religious workers, meet once 
each week for fellowship, information, 
and directed activities. The direction 
given by Dr. Reynolds and others in 
these sessions proves invaluable to all 
of us entering the field of Christian 
service. 

As a student, I have found a source 
of power and help in the many re- 
ligious activities on the Elon campus. 
It has been one of the highest privi- 
leges of my life to be a part of Elon 
College. 



ELON COLLEGE AND BOARD 
OF CHRISTIAN EDU- 
CATION. 
(Continued from page 3.) 

as well. Elon is the natural pivot, 
around which our whole Christian 
Education emphasis revolves. Indeed, 
one is made to wonder just what the 
program of Christian Education for 
this area of our church life really 
would be, or could be, without the 
ready facilities and accessibility of 
Elon College. The fine spirit of co- 
operation between the college admin- 
istration and those of us who are re- 
sponsible for the furtherance of 
Christian education has paid big divi- 
dends in both directions : It has been 
the means of interesting hundreds of 
our young people in Elon College, and 
they have come here for their college 
work. It has been invaluable to the 
Board of Christian Education to know 
that our college, and its facilities, are 
ours for the asking, and that we have 
such splendid facilities at our dis- 
posal in carrying forward the respon- 
sibilities, and the privileges, which 
have been assigned to us. 

The position of Elon College in the 
field of Christian Higher Education 
is unique in our entire fellowship. In 
recognition of this fact she will re- 
ceive constantly increasing support, 
from an ever widening constituency. 



Page Twelve. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 27, 1949. 



THE PRESENT STUDENT BODY. 

By Dean D. J. Bowden. 

If progress and development are 
measured in numbers, we have every 
reason to be proud of the growth of 
Elon. For the first time in history 
our enrollment for the fall term 
reached the figure of 830. Each year, 
since the termination of World War 
II, our student body has continued to 
expand. The four student classes are 
enrolled as follows: 



Seniors 129 

Juniors 156 

Sophomores 222 

Freshmen 276 

Special 47 



We expect, in May of this year, to 
graduate the largest senior class in 
the history of the college. 

According to states, our distribution 
is heavily weighted by sudents from 
North Carolina and Virginia, with a 
healthy sprinkling from other states 
and other countries. The distribution 
is approximately as follows : 



North Carolina 610 

Virginia 155 

Fourteen other states 61 

Foreign countries 4 



The denominational distribution is 
equally interesting. For many years, 
the Methodists, Baptists, and Congre- 
gational Christians have vied for first 
place. At pre ent, the distribution is 



as follows : 

Methodist 215 

Baptist 180 

Congregational Christian 140 

Presbyterian 80 

Catholic 35 

Others 180 



Because of the large number of 
veterans, we find an unusual situation 
in the ratio of men to women in our 
student body. At present, the ratio 
is consistent with last year, being ap- 
proximately four men to each woman. 

Finally, the ratio of dormitory stu- 
dents to day students is also out of 
proportion, due to the large student 
body and comparatively limited dor- 
mitory space. At present, approxi- 
mately forty-five per cent of our stu- 
dents live off the campus, either in 
their own homes or in rented apart- 
ments. The latter group is composed,.- 
of course, of the married veterans, for 
the most part, who live in apartments 
near the campus provided by the gov- 
ernment, or in or near Burlington. 

As we describe the present student 
body, we are naturally led to the hope 
that we may continue to minister to 
more and more young people who 
seek college education, and shall en- 
deavor, so far as possible, to expand 
our facilities to take care of them. 



MAJOR INTERESTS OF ELON COL- 
LEGE SENIORS— 1945-49. 

By A. L. Hook, Registrar. 

Not a few readers will be interested 
in the statistical growth of the senior 
class at Elon College during the past 
five-year period. The accompanying 
table reflects the trend and desire of 
college students, since the veterans 
of World War II started back to the 
civilian class rooms. 

Nearly all the gainful occupations 
claim the services of Elon graduates. 
The professions, such as dentistry, en- 
gineering, journalism, law, medicine, 
ministry, nursing, teaching, etc., are 



for either medicine, dentistry or 
chemical engineering; business ad- 
ministration majors plan to enter 
some phase of the business world ex- 
cept for a few young women in this 
field who prepare to teach commercial 
subjects in the public schools. The 
majors in English, foreign language, 
history, general science, home eco- 
nomics, physical education and mu- 
sic, usually prepare for teaching posi- 
tions in the public schools of the vari- 
ous states. Seniors with majors in 
mathematics and physics are claimed 
by industry and research. Majors in 
religion and social sciences are pre- 
paring for either the Christian min- 




PROFESSOR A. L. HOOK GIVES INSTRUCTION IN AERONAUTICS. 



represented by Elon men and women. 

In interpreting the percentage giv- 
en in the table below bear in mind 
the following trends : most of the stu- 
dents using either biology or chemis- 
try as majors enter the various gradu- 
ate institutions to prepare themselves 



istry, religious education or social 
welfare work. 

Majors during the period 1945-49, 
showing the number in each major 
field and the percentage of the whole 
class as well as the total for the five- 
year period: 



Major 1945 


% 


Biology 


3 


11.1 


Business Adm. . 


2 


7.4 




1 


3.7 


English 


12 


44.5 








General Science . 












Home Economics 


3 


11.1 


Mathematics . . . 








2 


7.4 


Physical Ed. .. 






Physics 


1 


3.7 


Religion 


3 


11.1 


Social Science . . 













Total 27 



946 


% 


1497 


% 


1948 


6 


17.1 


6 


8.2 


3 


2 


5.7 


14 


19.2 


20 


3 


8.6 


2 


2.7 


2 


11 


31.2 


19 


26.0 


13 










1 










3 


4 


11.4 


11 


15.0 


12 


3 


8.6 


8 


11.0 


4 










5 


2 


5.7 


3 


4.1 


3 










7 










1 


4 


11.4 


10 


13.7 


1 










2 


35 




73 




77 



% 


1949 


% 


Total 


% 


3.9 


14 


10.7 


32 


9.3 


26.0 


45 


33.3 


83 


24.1 


2.6 


8 


6.1 


16 


4.7 


16.7 


13 


10.0 


68 


19.8 


1.3 


1 


0.7 


2 


0.5 


3.9 


4 * 


3.3 


7 


2.0 


15.6 


10 


7.6 


37 


10.8 


5.2 


4 


3.3 


22 


6.4 


6.5 


7 


5.4 


12 


3.5 


3.9 


4 


3.3 


14 


4.1 


9.1 


6 


4.6 


13 


3.8 


1.3 


5 


3.8 


7 


2.0 


1.3 


6 


4.6 


24 


7.0 


2.6 


1 


0.8 


3 


0.9 




3 


2.3 


3 


0.9 




131 




343 





January 27, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Thirteen. 



VETERANS AS STUDENTS. 
(Continued from page 5.) 
tudes. They know how to be gentle- 
men. Their courtesy and general 
sense of propriety are to be commend- 
ed. 

Elon boasts over 400 veteran stu- 
dents. It is a delight to mingle with 
these pleasant good - natured boys. 
They come from varied backgrounds. 
They are of different heights, widths, 
and weights. But their congeniality 
is always manifest. They are inter- 
ested in scholarship, athletics, and so- 
cial activities. They know part of 
what goes on in this world, and want 
to know the rest and why ! If they 
appear somewhat independent at 
times, and flaunt a few "classic con- 
ventions," can we not say that they 
have earned this privilege, so long as 
questions of morality and gentlemanly 
propriety are not involved? 



' OUR CHURCH COLLEGES. 
(Continued from page 6.) 
Illinois, Illinois ; Knox, Illinois ; Mari- 
etta, Ohio; Northland, Wisconsin; 
Olivet, Michigan; Pacific University, 
Oregon; Piedmont, Georgia; Ripon, 
Wisconsin; .Schauffler, Ohio; Yank- 
ton, South Dakota. 

The following theological seminaries 
either have foundations or direct re- 
lationship to the denomination by 
election of trustees or other connec- 
tions : Andover- Newton, Massachu- 
setts; Atlanta Seminary Foundation, 
Tennessee ; Bangor, Maine ; Chicago, 
Illinois; Hartford, Connecticut; Ob- 
erlin, Ohio; Pacific, California; Yale, 
Connecticut; Yakton, South Dakota. 

The churches of the denomination 
have been leaders in the establishment 
of schools and colleges for Negroes. 
Hundreds of high schools and colleges 
have been established and maintained 
by the denomination. The Christian 
Church established Franklinton 
Christian College, Franklinton, North 
Carolina, which today functions as 
Franklinton Center and which spe- 
cializes in training Negro ministers 
and church leaders. The U n i te d 
Church maintains the following Ne- 
gro colleges and universities: Dil- 
lard, Louisiana ; LeMoyne, Tennessee ; 
Talladega, Alabama; Tillotson, Texas; 
Tougaloo, Mississippi; Fisk, Tennes- 
see. 

Higher education in our day is 
tending toward secularism. It will be 
unfortunate for our country and for 
our church if there should be any les- 
sening of emphasis upon support of 
our church institutions. America 



needs higher Christian education, and 
an investment in the schools and col- 
leges of the church will not only de- 
velop the church but will have a 
strong effect upon the whole character 
and strength of our national, econom- 
ic, and social life. 

Wm. T. Scott. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 
(Continued from page 8.) 

"Peahead" Walker at Wake Forest, 
and ' ' Chubby ' ' Kirkland at Catawba. 

There are also a large number of 
younger fellows who are making a 
name for themselves in this and oth- 
er states. Those who are included in 
the new alumni directory are: T. S. 
Cheek, 209 W. Smith St., Greensboro, 
N. C. — teacher and high school coach; 
Scott Boyd, Louisburg College, Louis- 
burg, N. C. — director of athletics and 
dean of men ; Donald Gen Aunnan, 
Hillsboro, N. C. — high school coach; 
Silvo W. Caruso, Tabor City, N. C— 
teacher and coach; Garland Causey, 
Goldsboro, N. C, — head football and 
basket ball coach (formerly line coach 
at Elon) ; Robert Lee "Jack" Boone, 
Greenville, N. C. — assistant football 
coach and head baseball coach at 
E.C.T.G; Charles Donate, Water- 
bury, Conn. — high school football 
coach; Warren Burns, Elon College, 
N. C. — head football coach at Burling- 
ton High ,School; Raymond "Pud" 
D 'Antonio, Wayne, Pa. — high school 
coach; Robert E. Lee, Aberdeen, N. 
C. — high school coach; J. C. Casey, 
Elon College, N. C. — high school 
coach at Gibsonville, N. C. ; W. J. 
Palantonio, Ardmore, Pa. — football 
coach ; Hal Bradley, Lillington, N. C. 
— high school coach. 

Most of these listed above gradu- 
ated before or just after the second 
World War and before the present 
training program in Physical Educa- 
tion began. This program actually 
was begun in the Fall of 1946 and the 
first full class from this program will 
not graduate until 1950. However, a 
number of students who had had work 
at Elon or elsewhere before this date 
have graduated with either a major 
or a minor in physical education. 
These students who have left us dur- 
ing the past two years are : Richard 
Staton, Greenbrier Military Acad- 
emy, Lewisburg, W. Va. — assistant 
football coach; J. W. Knight, Reids- 
ville, N. C. — assistant football coach ; 
Lewis Brownie, Stoneville, N. C. — 
high school coach; Edna Rumley, 
Minueral Springs, Forsyth County, 
Winston-Salem, N. C. — physical edu- 



cation teacher; Frank Roberts, Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, chapel Hill, 
N. C. — graduate study ; Frances St. 
Clair, University of North Carolina, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. — graduate study; 
Steve Castura — teaching and gradu- 
ate study in the District of Columbia; 
Robert W. Wooldridge, Columbia Un- 
iversity, New York City — graduate 
work; Franklin McCauley, George 
Peabody College, Nashville, Tenn. — 
graduate study ; Frank Hayes, Jr., 
University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. — 
graduate study. 

At the 1949 commencement we 
shall graduate approximately eight 
people with a major in physical edu- 
cation. At present we have 65 to 70 
majors studying in this field ; with 
some planning to teach, some to coach 
and teach, and others to enter the field 
of public recreation. This depart- 
ment is also offering several courses 
in the area of recreation and physical 
activity which are proving of inter- 
est and value to those who are major- 
ing in religion or religious education. 

Several of our graduates are al- 
ready working in the field of recre- 
ation and boys' work. „ Some of them 
with their present situations are : 
Jerry David Hardy, Catonsville, Md. 
— boys' work, secretary, Baltimore 
Y.M.C.A. ; Oscar B. Gorman, Atlanta, 
Ga. — executive of Boy Scouts' or- 
ganization of America ; Garland 
O'Mann — athletic director of Greens- 
boro (N. C.) Recreation Dept. ; Oka 
T. Hester — director of Greensboro 
(N. C.) Recreation Dept.; Paul 
Cheek, Asheboro, N. C. — director of 
athletics and recreation, McCrary Ho- 
siery Mills; Roney Cates, Burlington, 
N. C. — director of recreation ; Claude 
Comer, Burlington, N. C. — assistant 
director of recreation. 



RELIGION MAJORS AT ELON. 
(Continued from page 9.) 

Christian leadership. Their religious 
interests are guided, cultivated, and 
extended. Their convictions are al- 
lowed to grow in accord with a natural 
pattern. The foundations are laid for 
fruitful careers that will increase in 
effectiveness with the passing of years. 

These religion majors and this pro- 
gram of training constitute Elon's 
answer to the challenge of the post- 
war world for consecrated and able 
Christian leaders. Its success depends 
in a large measure upon the concern 
of thoughtful people in our churches 
who are able to read the signs of the 
times and are determined to heed 
them. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 27, 1949. 



Sunday School Lesson 

By Rev. H. S. Hardcastle, D. D. 



JESUS' EARLY TEACHING AND 
HEALING. 

Lesson VI — February 6, 1949. 

Memory Selection : He went about 
all Galilee, teaching in their syna- 
gogues, and preaching the gospel of 
the Kingdom, and healing every 
disease. — Matthew 4 :23. 

Lesson : Mark 1 =14-15 ; 21-45 ; Luke 
4 :16-30. 

Devotional Eeading : Luke 4 :40-5 :3. 

"Jesus came into Galilee preaching 
the gospel of God" — thus does Mark 
introduce the public ministry of Je- 
sus. Matthew says the same thing in 
a little different way, ' ' He went about 
all Galilee, teaching in their syna- 
gogues, and preaching the gospel of 
the kingdom. ' ' The important fact is 
that Jesus came preaching. There 
are many people today who speak 
lightly of preaching, and who often 
dismiss preaching as words, words, 
words, nothing but words. In fact a 
graduating class of a high school had 
as it motto, ' ' Deeds, not words. ' ' Well 
to be sure deeds are important. Jesus 
himself had something to say about 
those who ' ' say and do not. ' ' But so 
far as the record goes Jesus never 
wrote anything except on one occasion 
when he scribbled something on the 
ground. He depended upon the pow- 
er of the spoken word. He believed 
in the power of preaching, which 
Philipps Brooks once defined as 
"truth communicated through per- 
sonality." The more one thinks about 
the matter, the more impressive does 
the thing become. The proclamation 
of the Kingdom began with preaching. 
The great eras in the history of the 
church have been eras marked by 
great preaching. And preaching still 
has a place in modern life. Now, as 
then, the spoken word can come with 
power. In fact the great Apostle under 
the inspiration of the Spirit said that 
God had chosen "the foolishness of 
preaching to save them that believe. ' ' 
Not foolish preaching, but the fool- 
ishness of preaching. Mr. Minister, 
you still have a function, a vital func- 
tion in our modern world. 

Jesiis Came Teaching. 

"He went about all Galilee, teach- 
ing in their synagogues." Here again 
He depended upon the power of the 
spoken word, on the quickening power 



of truth in the minds and hearts of 
people. It is difficult to know when 
Jesus was preaching and when He 
was teaching, so easily did the one 
shade off into the other. Both as a 
preacher and as a teacher, Jesus was 
the Master. Modern pedagogy simply 
discovers the principles of sound 
teaching when it goes back to Jesus. 
The common people heard Him 
gladly, for he taught simply, clearly, 
informally, vitally. He taught them 
as one who had authority, and not as 
the scribes who simply repeated par- 
rot-like what somebody else had said. 
Christianity has always had a place, 
and a prominent place, for teaching. 
Mr. Sunday School Teacher, you still 
have a vital function in our modern 
world. And the message of Jesus 
and the method of Jesus give you a 
vital and powerful combination. 
Jesus 'Came Healing. 
"He went about all Galilee . . . 
healing every (or all) manner of dis- 
ease." We call Him the Great Phy- 
sician, and we do well, for so He was, 
and is. There is significance in the 
fact that most of the miracles of Jesus 
were concerned with healing the bod- 
ies and the minds of men. It is sig- 
nificant, too, that the word salvation 
really means "wholeness." God's will 
for men is a sound mind in a sound 
body, and all under the discipline of 
a sound spirit. There is an element 
of mystery and even of miracle in the 
healing' ministry of Jesus. There is 
no doubt about the fact that He did 
heal both diseases of the body and of 
the mind. And it would appear that 
He was able to exercise His healing 
ministry in the case of organic as 
well as functional diseases. There 
were occasions when he used the pow- 
er of suggestiveness in working his 
healing miracles. Several times he 
used physical aids as when he anoint- 
ed the eyes of the blind man with clay. 
In -every case He sought to awaken 
faith. And He enabled more than 
one person,' mentally ill and even de- 
ranged to find sanity and serenity of 
mind and peace of heart. Whether 
we can account for the healing mira- 
cles of Jesus, there they stand, his- 
torically attested acts of healing. 
They would tell us that God is not 
only concerned with physical and 
mental health, but that after all He 
is the One Who heals. Long before 



the day of Jesus the Psalmist sang, 
"Who healeth all thy diseases" and 
he knew what he was singing. For 
today the wise physician will say that 
he cannot heal — God is the healer, and 
as a physician he simply stands in the 
breach, administering such aids as he 
has, in the hope and in the faith that 
Nature and God alone can truly heal. 
And many people who are running off 
to secular sources for help in mental 
ills would do well to try religion. In- 
deed the best psychiatrists frankly 
admit that religion has healing power. 
The doctors say the same thing. — ■ 
faith has healing values. Here then 
in this three-fold ministry of Jesus, 
teaching and preaching and healing, 
we find the key to His mission. And 
we find the broader outlines, of the 
program of the Kingdom of God for 
our modern world, and fields of ac- 
tivity for the Church of our Christ. 

Preaching Out of the Overflow. 
A great teacher of our day some- 
time ago wrote a series of articles on 
great preachers, and the general 
theme of the series was that these 
men "preached out of the overflow." 
Although He did not list Jesus 
among these great ministers — he was 
dealing with more modern ministers — 
he might well have done it. For Je- 
sus preached out of the overflow of a 
great and deep spiritual life. He 
dwelt deep. The springs of His life 
were deep and full and constant. And 
Mark gives us an insight as to why 
this was so. ' ' In the morning a great 
while before day, He rose up and went 
out into a desert place, and there 
prayed." Jesus constantly renewed 
His inner life by waiting on God in 
prayer, by being still before God, by 
communion with God. One reason 
why so much of our modern preach- 
ing is so weak is because, it is so shal- 
low and thin. The modern minister 
must be so much a jack of all trades 
that if he is not careful he will be 
caught up in many things, good 
things, even important things, but he 
will be so busy that he does not take 
time to renew the intake, and there- 
fore the out-flow is thin and weak. 
-Again and again Jesus withdrew from 
the busy world, from the crowd, and 
even from His intimate friends to 
renew the springs of His inner life. 
And all that He did and was was the 
overflow of this inner life of the Spir- 
it. Our deepest need is for greater 
and richer inner resources. 

Preaching, or Medling? 
When Jesus came back to Naza- 
reth where He had been brought up, 
(Continued on next page.) 



January 27, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Fifteen. 



!The Orphanage § 
Chas. D. Johnston, Supt. 1 

Dear Friends : 

Orphanages are very worthy insti- 
tutions. They deserve and should 
have the love and cooperation of the 
churches and the people at large. They 
go to the rescue of a great number of 
little children throughout the land, 
who are homeless and dependent, and 
give them a home and care. Can you 
imagine a more helpless being than a 
little child left helpless and alone? 
Many times this is the case. We have 
many calls to take children who are 
in needy circumstances, and we can- 
not take them because of the lack of 
funds. 

In taking children from all kinds of 
homes and environments, you may not 
believe it, but sometimes we get some 
of the sweetest little fellows you can 
imagine. The writer went up to the 
building, known as the Christian Or- 
phanage Building, some days ago of 
which Miss Hattie Brakefield is in 
charge. Miss Hattie, as we all call 
her, had just returned from the hos- 
pital where she had had an operation. 
I think she has two very sweet little 
girls in her building. While I was 
talking to her these two little girls 
came in and put their little arms 
around her and said, "Miss Hattie, 
we prayed for you every night while 
you were away. We are so glad you 
are back." The writer had an acci- 
dent during the Christmas holidays 
and the doctor put him to bed for 
three days or more, and these same lit- 
tle girls turned to me and said, "Mr. 
Johnston, we prayed for you, too." 
Such simple faith. Such a beautiful 
spirit manifested by these two little 
jewels. It makes one better to know 
that these two little tots in their little 
simple prayers remembered us. Yet, 
they are two little girls in the Chris- 
tian Orphanage. Who knows but that 
God heard and answered their peti- 
tions. 

The writer has always been a great 
believer in earnest sincere prayer. We 
like to know that our church people 
pray for us in this work. If you have 
forgotten us, it would make us strong- 
er if we could know that you were 
holding us up before the throne of 
Mercy. We have our troubles as well 
as our joys. We have our disappoint- 
ments. We are not resting on a bed 
of roses. This is no easy job; it's 
work every day. In my thirty-two 
years in this work I have tried to be 
faithful and make every day count 



for something worthwhile. Pray that 
in my declining years here, which are 
soming to a close one of these days 
and others will take up where I leave 
off, that God will bless me and turn 
my dark days into sunshine and our 
disappointments into blessings. 

Chas. D. Johnston, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT FOR JANUARY 27, 1949. 
Sunday School Monthly Offerings. 

Amount brought forward $ 235.88 

Eastern N. 0. Conference : 

Mt. Carmel $ 9.00 

Piney Plain 20.00 

Turner's Chapel (T'giving) 33.37 

Turner's Chapel 35.00 

97.37 

Eastern Va. Conference : 

Cypress Chapel (T'giving)$ 31.45 

Rosemont (Simmon's chil- 
dren) 25.00 

Rosemont 42.00 

Portsmouth, Eirst, S. S. . 16.66 

115.11 

N. C. & Va. Conference: 

Burlington S. S $ 54.41 

Reidsville S. S 21.00 

Union (Va.) 50.00 

Western N. C. Conference : 

Spoon's Chapel 24.04 

Total this week from churches $ 361.93 

Total this year from churches $ 597.81 
Special Offerings. 

Amount brought forward $ 199.09 

Mr. Hughes, children . . . .$ 45.00 
Mr. Hairfield, children . . . 20.00 
Mr. Rumley, Jerry Wilkins 10.00 
Mr. Whittaker, Tommy Wil- 
kins 10.00 

Oak Grove Y. P. Society . 5.00 
Interest, National Bank . 50.00 

Mable Haith, rent 2.00 

L. S. Holt 150.00 

292.00 

Total this week from 

Special Offerings $ 292.00 

Total this year from 

Special Offerings $ 491.09 

Grand total for the week ... $ 653.93 

Grand total for the year . . . $1,088.90 



ELON AND LAYWOMEN. 
(Continued from page 2.) 
nation. For it is women who are will- 
ing to serve in small or great places ; 
it is women who glorify the little tasks 
and make them great ; it is women 
who are not only willing to do the 
job at hand but are eager to reach 
out into broader fields of service. 

We can think of any number of 
"Elon girls" that have served well 
in their local churches and communi- 
ties, in their state conferences and 
Convention, yet who have not been 
content to stop there, but have gone on 
to make good in broader fields, serving 



with ability and dignity on our Na- 
tional Church Boards and other places 
of responsibility. For instance, there 
is Lucy Eldridge rendering invalu- 
able service in the field of Missionary 
Education for Young People; and 
Pattie Lee Coghill who as a secretary 
of The Missions Council has traveled 
and worked in many areas of the 
United States and other parts of the 
world. Right now, she is temporarily 
"back home" helping to promote Our 
Christian World M i s s i o n among 
churches in this area. Then there is 
Graham Wisseman who does so much 
so well at home and is now serving as 
one of the directors of the Home Mis- 
sion Board. We could mention oth- 
ers whose places are hard to fill that 
got their start at Elon, for it was 
there, perhaps, they were first inspir- 
ed toward Religious Education work. 

Women have always been and will 
always be among those who serve, and 
we are grateful for our own Elon Col- 
lege which through the years has laid 
the foundations for such service. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON. 
(Continued on page 15.) 
his fellow-townsmen heard Him glad- 
ly and wondered at the gracious words 
that proceeded out His mouth. But 
when He began to tell them that God 
cared for other people and that He 
had revealed His compassion and con- 
cern for hated foreigners, the people 
just could not take it. They felt sure 
that He had stopped preaching then, 
and gone to meddling, as the old Ne- 
gro woman said when the minister 
mentioned the filthy habit of dipping 
snuff in a sermon. As a matter of 
fact, the truth, while it sets men free, 
often hurts. People do not always 
like to be told the truth. All too many 
times, folks want to hear what they 
like instead of what they need. They 
like to hear a minister denounce sin 
in others, but they do not want him to 
interfere with their personal vices and 
sins. The words of Jesus are often 
rejected in many a modern church, 
and if it could be done, they would 
cast Him out of the church. 



APPORTIONMENT GIVING. 



Previously reported $ 348.40 

Eastern N . C. Conference : 

Mt. Auburn 38.(T 

N. C. & Va. Conference: 

Hebron 9.00 

Western N. C. Conference : 

Spoon's Chapel 2.15 



Total $ 49.75 



Grand total $ 398.15 



Page Sixteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



January 27, 1949. 



The COLLEGE PERIOD 

By PRESIDENT L. E. SMITH 



January and February constitute the college 
period so designated by the Southern Conven- 
tion. During this period the College, its ad- 
vantages, it assets, and its needs are to be 
brought to the attention of our church people 
with instructions how to take advantage of 
what the College offers and to assist in meeting 
its needs. The Convention has directed that 
fifteen thousand dollars be apportioned to the 
churches of the Convention for the current 
support of the College during the church year 
1949. This amount has been apportioned to 
the conferences of the Convention which in 
turn have made 
apportionments to 
the local churches 
within each con- 
ference. The col- 
lege period is not 
so much for the 
collecting of mon- 
ey but to confront 
the churches with 
the fact that they 
are asked to secure 
the amount appor- 
tioned during the 
year. 

When we are 
asked to support 
our College we 
should be remind- 
ed that it is needed 
by our church 
more sorely today 
than ever before. More stress is laid upon the 
need for Christian education in our public 
schools and in our institutions of higher learn- 
ing than we have known, certainly, in the past 
two decades. The world is beginning to sense 
the fact that the hope of society and of the 
human race lies in the Christian religion. 
That, if the Christian religion is to be a vital 
force in the lives of individuals, the spirit and 
principle of the Christian religion must find 
their places in the education and the training 
of the individual himself. Our schools and 
colleges are founded for that purpose. They 
dtp duly constituted agencies for instructing 
and guiding the children and the youth of our 
homes in their preparation for life. 




THE COLLEGE CAMPUS LOOKING EAST 



Lines are being pretty clearly drawn be- 
tween church and state — between state schools 
and church schools. Politicians and aspirants 
to public office and positions of trust are calling 
for the continuation of separation of state and 
church to which we agree. We, perhaps, would 
differ, however, on what constitutes the sepa- 
ration of church and state. The Christian lay- 
man is to give his money through the govern- 
ment, if you please, and then to contend that 
that money given by a Christian layman can- 
not be administered for the education of his 
and his neighbor's children enrolled in a tax- 
supported college 
without the viola- 
tion of the prin- 
ciple of the sepa- 
ration of church 
and state is ridicu- 
lous. The funds 
given by the pub- 
lic should be used 
for the training of 
young people to 
improve society 
and advance the 
interest of truth 
and right, without 
regard to the col- 
lege in which he 
may be enrolled. 
It is the responsi- 
bility of the state 
to assist in the 
education of its 
support any par- 



young people and not to 
ticular school. 

Elon College is a church school. It needs 
support. It must have support. It cannot meet 
the demands of the day without increased sup- 
port. It must have funds which will enable it 
to measure arms with sister institutions in the 
matter of Christian higher education. Elon 
looks to its church, its alumni, and the friends 
of Christian higher education to provide neces- 
sary funds for the enlarged curriculum that it 
must launch if it is to meet the demands of 
this present day. 

In this issue of The Christian Sun Elon 
speaks from different angles. We trust that it 
may be heard gladly and with appreciation. 



1844 ^&^P^9B9i<»^ the Denomination - 1949 

The CHRMTAN SUN 

ORGAN OF THE SOUTHERN CONVENTION OF CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 
In Essentials, Unity — In Non-Essentials, Liberty — In All Things, Charity 



Volume CI. 



RICHMOND, VA., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1949. 



Number 5. 




The Virginia Council of Churches held its Annual Meeting last week in St. John's 
Evangelical and Reformed Church at Richmond. Bishop Frederick D. Goodwin was 
elected president to succeed Dr. R. B. Montgomery. Rev. Robert Lee House was elected 
Chairman of the Commission on Activities and Dr. Will B. O'Neill was elected to the 
Executive Committee. The ten departments of the Council are : Christian Education, 
Comity and Missions, Council of Church Women, Evangelism, Interracial Cooperation, 
Radio, Rural Church, Social Education and Action, Worship and Youth Council. 
Dr. Minor C. Miller is the Executive Secretary. 



Page Two. 

1 News Flashes f 

Our issue for March 3 will be de- 
voted to Evangelism. 

Ten members were received last 
Sunday by Rev. J. E. Neese at Sec- 
ond Church, Norfolk, Va. 



It is reported that Rev. G. H. Vea- 
zey and Miss Mabel Higgs were mar- 
ried last Sunday at Newport Church, 
Shenandoah, Va. Congratulations ! 



Subscriptions for the 1949 Far East 
Literary Newsletter may be had for 
$1.00. Dr. Frank Laubach is editor. 
Address : Room 1111, 156 Fifth Ave- 
nue, New York City 10. 



On the week end of February 18, 
Mr. James E. Walter, secretary of the 
Project Department of the American 
Board, will visit the Reidsville church 
and speak at the Sunday services. 



The parsonage at Sophia which is 
sponsored by Flint Hill (R) and So- 
phia churches is expected to be com- 
pleted within a short time, and the 
minister, Rev. W. T. Madren, and 
family moved into this beautiful new 
home. 

The 1948 Elon College Alumni Di- 
rectory has been published. Cover 
pages in color, pictorial section, direc- 
tory by classes and localities make this 
an interesting and useful publication. 
Copies are available from Mr. James 
F. Darden, Alumni Secretary. 



The Rev. A. Lanson Granger, Jr., 
preached each evening last week at 
our Asheboro church. This is the first 
Preaching Mission held in the new 
building, and Mr. Granger was the 
first pastor of the church. He spoke 
both morning and evening on Sunday. 



Miss Pattie Lee Coghill recently 
visited the Reidsville Church, speak- 
ing to the Sunday school teachers 
about missionary materials and meth- 
ods; to the Woman's Auxiliary on a 
"Report from China;" and to the 
church officers on ' ' Opportunities for 
Christian Service." 



The Rev. L. M. Presnell, pastor, re- 
ports that a parsonage is to be built 
shortly at Seagrove. That will be a 
good place for a minister to live and 
serve Seagrove and some near - by 
churches, perhaps Ether, Shady Grove 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 

and New Center, or such others as 
might like to cooperate in a pastorate. 



In accordance with a vote of the 
Western North Carolina Conference, 



VIRGINIA COUNCIL PRESIDENT 




The Rt. Rev. Frederick D. Goodwin 

Newly elected president of the Virginia 
Council of Churches, is a graduate of the 
College of William and Mary and of the 
Virginia Theological Seminary. He has 
served as the Bishop of the Diocese of Vir- 
ginia since 1942. 

VIRGINIA COUNCIL EXECUTIVE 




The Rev. Minor C. Miller 

Executive Secretary of the Virginia Council 
of Churches, has completed 25 years of co- 
operative work in Virginia. His primary 
interest has been that of religious education. 
He succeeds Rev. Henry Lee Robison. 



an Institute on Evangelism and Stew- 
ardship was held on Sunday, January 
30, at the Asheboro Church. Ad- 
dresses were given by Rev. Lanson 
Granger, former pastor, and Rev. W. 



February 3, 1949. 

M 

H 

C. Lyerly, secretary of the Southern / 
Synod of the Evangelical and Re- 
formed Church. In the afternoon spe- 
cial classes were' held : for ministers, 
by Rev. Joe A. French; for teachers, 
by Mrs. F. C. Lester; for deacons, by 
Rev. W. M. Stevens; missions (wo- 
men), Mrs. E. P. Boroughs; others, 
Rev. W. W. Hall 



Reports at the annual meeting of 
the Asheboro church, Wednesday of 
last week, indicate that the church 
owns property worth $70,000 on which 
there is an indebtedness of $20,000; 
that the members of the congregation 
gave more than $11,000 last year, and 
have averaged $233 per Sunday this 
year ; that last year the resident mem- 
bership increased from 52 to 74, and 
that there are ten non-resident mem- 
bers of the church; that the average 
attendance at Sunday school last year 
was 90, while the usual attendance 
now is near 125 ; that the committee 
on membership has a prospective list 
of fifty people ; and that the church 
appears to be ready for steady growth. 



REV. KENNETH REGISTER ELECT- 
ED TO N. C. RURAL CHURCH 
INSTITUTE. 

At a joint meeting of the N. C. Ru- 
ral Church Institute Directors and 
the Rural Affairs Commission of the 
N. C. Council of Churches on Janu- 
ary 11, 1949, at Durham, Rev. Ken- 
neth Register was elected as a Direc- 
tor of the Rural Church Intitute and 
as a member of the Rural Affairs Com- 
mission. Mr. Register is president of 
the N. C. & Va. Conference and pas- 
tor of the Union Ridge Congregation- 
al Christian Church, Burlington, N. 
C. 

Heading both the Directors and the 
Commission is Rev. Garland Stafford, 
a Methodist minister of Taylorsville, 
N. C. Dr. Trela Collins, a Baptist 
minister of Durham, is vice-president 
of the Directors of the Rural Church 
Institute. Rev. J. H. Carter, a Pres- 
byterian minister of Newton, is the 
secretary-treasurer. One of the fam- 
ous members of the Directors and the 
Rural Affairs Commission is the pres- 
ent Governor of North Carolina, the 
Honorable Kerr Scott. 

The Rural Church Institute will be 
held in conjunction with the Pastors' 
School at Duke University this June 
7-10. Registration will be $2 and 
then you will have the privilege of 
eating where you like. All pastors of 
our churches should plan now to be 
present. 

W. J. Andes. 



February 3, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Three. 



Southern Convention Office 



Rev. Wm. T. Scott, Superintendent 



EASTERN VIRGINIA LEADERSHIP 
TRAINING SCHOOLS. 

Leadership Training Schools will 
be held in the Eastern Virginia Con- 
ference February 13-23. These schools 
are being arranged by pastors of the 
conference in cooperation with the 
Board of Christian Education of the 
Convention Division of Leadership 
Training headed by Rev. Robert Lee 
House and Superintendent Wm. T. 
Scott. 

Two schools will be held (Norfolk- 
Portsmouth and Suffolk Areas), The 
school for the Norfolk-Portsmouth 
Area will begin Sunday afternoon, 
February 13, at the Rosemont Church. 
Rev. Herbert G. Council, Jr., of Rose- 
mont Church, is the general chairman 
of this school and is supported by a 
committee consisting of Rev. Johnson 
L. Griffin (Bay View), Rev. Peter 
Young (Christian Temple), Rev. John 
L. Gwin (Norfolk, First), Rev. Ellis 
Clark (Berea), Rev. M E. Taylor 
(Little Creek), Rev. J. E. Neese (Nor- 
folk, Second), Rev. 0. D. Poythress 
(South Norfolk), Rev. Stanley Carne 
(Portsmouth, First), Dr. Frank H. 
Lewis (Portsmouth, Shelton Memor- 
ial), and Dr. H. S. Hardcastle (New- 
port News). 

The Norfolk - Portsmouth Area 
School will include three courses : 

1. (211a) — "Planning for Chil- 
dren in the Sunday School." This 
course will be taught by Miss Leila 
Anderson, of the Division of Chris- 
tian Education of the Board of Home 
Missions, Boston, Mass., and the 
course will be for teachers of children 
in the Sunday school, dealing with 
materials and methods for successful 
teaching and guiding children of the 
Beginner, Primary and Junior ages. 

2. (311a)— "Teaching Youth," 
taught by Rev. Bernard V. Munger, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. Mr. Munger is a 
graduate student at Duke University 
and pastor of our Chapel Hill Church. 
This will be a course for teachers of 
youth and will deal with such mat- 
ters as how learning takes place ; how 
to use lesson materials; how to sup- 
plement these materials and relate 
them to the ongoing experiences of 
that age ; how to deal with the actual 
problems and needs of the group ; how 
to link teaching with actual living. 

3. (610a) — "How to Improve Our 
Sunday School," taught by Dr. W. 



W. Sloan of the Elon College Depart- 
ment of Religious Education. This 
courses will be primarily for superin- 
tendents and officers, young people 
and adult class teachers of the Sunday 
school, and the purpose of the course 
will be to help these officers to dis- 
cover some of the points at which 
their schools may be improved, and 
some practical steps that can be taken 
immediately. 

The Norfolk - Portsmouth Area 
School will have two sessions on Sun- 
day, February 13 — afternoon and eve- 
ning; sessions on Monday, Tuesday 
and Wednesday evenings, the school 
closing on Wednesday evening, Feb- 
ruary 16. 

The Suffolk Area School will begin 
Sunday afternoon, February 20 and 
will be concluded on Wednesday eve- 
ning, the 23rd. At this school the 
courses taught will be "Planning for 
Children in the Sunday School" by 
Miss Leila Anderson, "Teaching 
Youth" by Rev. Bernard V. Munger. 
Dr. Ferris E. Reynolds will teach in 
this school instead of Dr. Sloan, and 
Dr. Reynolds' course will be 120a— 
"The Life of Christ." Dr. Reynolds 
is the head of the Department of Re- 
ligion at Elon College. This course 
on the Life of Christ will be designed 
to help teachers in presenting the Life 
of Christ, which is the theme of the 
Sunday school lessons for the next six 
months. 

The Suffolk Area School will be 
held in the Suffolk Christian Church 
and Dr. John G. Truitt is the General 
Chairman. His committee consists of 
(Continued on page 10.) 



The Christian Sun 

Established 1844 by Rev. Daniel W. Kerr. 

A Religious Weekly for the Home, devoted 
to the interests of the Kingdom as represent- 
ed by the Congregational Christian Churches. 
Our Principles. 

1. The Lord Jesus Christ is the only 
Head of the Church. 

2. Christian is a sufficient name for the 
Church. 

3. The Bible is a sufficient rule of faith 
and practice. 

4. Christian character is a sufficient test 
of fellowship and Church membership. 

5. The right of private judgment and the 
liberty of conscience is a right and a privi- 
lege that should be accorded to and exer- 
cised by all. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor Robert Lee House 

Managing Editor John T. Kernodle 

Associate Editors — J. B. Allen, H. Q. Couu- 
cill Jr., J. H. Dollar, F. B. Eutsler, S. C. 
Harrell, R. M. Kimball, B. V. Munger, 
J. E. Neese, W. W. Sloan, H. S. Smith. 
Corresponding Editors — J. F. Apple (E. N. 
C), W. M. Stevens (N. C. & Va.), F. C. 
Lester (W. N. C), J. G. Truitt (E. Va.), 
R. A. Whitten (V. Va.). 
Departmental Editors — Wm. T. Scott, Con- 
vention; Mrs. W. J. Andes, Women's 
Work; Miss Elizabeth Chicoine, Young 
People's Work; Mrs. R. L. House, Chil- 
dren; L. E. Smith, Christian Education; 
Chas. D. Johnston, Orphanage; H. S. 
Hardcastle, Sunday School. 
Board of Publications— W. J. Andes, S. E. 
Madren, W. M. Stevens, W. E. Wisseman, 
T. F. Wright. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Six Months $1-00 

One Year $2.00 

Published by the Board of Publications, 
agent for the Southern Convention of Con- 
gregational Christian Churches, and printed 
every Thursday except the last in June and 
December by the Central Publishing Co., 
Inc., Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Post 
Office at Richmond, Va., July 25, 1922, un- 
der Act of March 3, 1879. 

Remittances for subscriptions should be sent 
to the Convention Office, Elon College, 
N. C. 

All other matters of business should be ad- 
dressed to The Christian Sun, 1536 EaBt 
Broad Street, Richmond, 19, Va. 

Contributions should reach the editor at 
3120b' Grove Avenue, Richmond, 21, Va 



The Christian Sun Subscription Blank 

FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 
FIFTY ISSUES FOR $2.00 

Dr. Wm. T. Scott 
Elon College, N. C. 

Enclosed find $ for which please send The Christian 

Sun for one year to 

Address 

Name ; 

L J New 1 J Renewal 



Page Four. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 3, 1949. 




THE EDITOR'S J^ESSAGE 




THE RELEVANCE OF COMITY. 

Comity (courtesy) arrangements are essential in 
modern churchmanship. This belated realization is 
gradually dawning on our Protestant consciousness. Our 
leaders, as lucidly stated in the accompanying article 
by Dr. North, are keenly and painfully aware of its 
relevance. The hope is that the idea will percolate down 
into state, city and county church organizations. This is 
slowly but surely taking place. More people are becom- 
ing acquainted with the word itself. The plan is being 
accorded wider recognition and acceptance. 

The Virginia Council of Churches has a department 
of Comity and Missions. This Department, ably headed 
by Dr. Ernest Trice Thompson of Union Theological 
Seminary, recommends that committees on comity be 
set up by all local councils of churches and all ministerial 
associations in rural or urban areas. It recommends that 
the following "Comity Principles" be considered in con- 
nection with the establishment of such committees: 

It shall be policy of the Comity Committee — by in- 
vestigation, conferences, advice and recommendation — to 
aid in securing the organization and distribution of the 
churches of the city (or county) so as to promote primari- 
ly to advancement of the Kingdom of God; seeking that 
no portion of the city (or county) shall be overchurched ; 
and that every church may feel the cooperative support of 
the other churches of the city (or county). 

In addition to the adjustment of specific cases 
through common counsel, the Committee will seek to de- 
velop a comprehensive plan based on the comparative 
study of community needs. It will endeavor to effect 
modifications in the number, placement, equipment and 
program of the churches to match changes in the com- 
munity such as growth or decline of population, changed 
character of different areas of the community, emergent 
needs and the challenge of specific deficiencies or evils. 

The Council (or Ministerial Association) recognizes 
that there are certain conscientious limitations felt by some 
Christian bodies in the matter of Comity between denomi- 
nations and gives assurance that such conscientious con- 
victions will always be respected by members of the Coun- 
cil (or Ministerial Association). 

The Committee will seek to implement its conclusions 
by rendering advisory judgments on specific issues which 
may come before it, as reached through the democratic 
processes of mutual discussion and finding their authority 
in their essential reasonableness and the obligations of 
Christian solidarity and good will. It is believed that the 
joint wisdom of the churches arrived at through common 
counsel will lead to the acceptance of advisory judgments 
by the parties concerned. 

Before a cooperative congregation or denomination 
takes definite action in such matters as the organization 
of a church, purchase of church property, the relocation 
of a church, a radical change in its program or the aban- 
donment of a field, it should be encouraged to make its 
intentions known to the Comity Committee and seek its 
counsel. 

This provision would apply equally to Sunday 
Schools and missions, and the same course should be fol- 




lowed in any preliminary action such as the establishment 
of a temporary preaching point or Sunday School. 

In some communities, or larger areas, it may become 
desirable to effect a mutual exchange of fields. In others 
it may seem desirable for two or more churches to de- 
velop an integrated or cooperative program in some par- 
ticular phase of their work that the needs of the com- 
munity may be more adequately met. 

In all such cases the Comity Committee will give its 
advice and aid upon request or it may make such sug- 
gestions on its own initiative. 

It recommends that these resolutions be submitted 
to the constituent bodies of the Council for their endorse- 
ment and approval. 



CHRISTIANS AT THEIR BEST. 

One of the fine statements which has gone the ec- 
clesiastical and homiletic rounds is this: "When the 
world is at its worst, Christians ought to be at their 
best." Now this writer does not subscribe to the belief 
that the world is at its worst. Far from it, for there are 
too many evidences of good and noble work. However, 
the world is at its worst in many respects and in many 
places. Undeniably there is a vast and distressing 
amount of crime, bloodshed, hatred, injustice, violence, 
poverty, disease, suffering, war, premature and unneces- 
sary death. 

The Biblical record indicates that when and where 
the world was at its worst, Christians were at their best. 
Stephen, the first Christian martyr; Paul, the suffering 
saint, theologian and missionary; the Seer of Patmos; 
these and many other superlative Christians have left an 
undying record of demonstrable Christianity. 

Edward H. Pruden is right in his insistence that 
"Mediocre Christians will never do much to make a bad 
world better. Much of our present distress is due largely 
to inadequate Christians." Christ's prescription, we re- 
member, was this: "Be ye also perfect, even as your 
Father which is in heaven is perfect." 

Christians are at their best, to be sure, when they 
are nurtured and habituated in righteousness, in ex- 
emplary living. Christians are at their best when they 
serve cooperatively. Every local church is a monument 
to cooperative endeavor. One of the hopeful things 
about contemporary Christianity is the growth of co- 
operative work among the denominations. The Vir- 
ginia Council of Churches completed a most successful 
year with operating expenses amounting to $46,801.00. 
The budget this year is $49,146. The Virginia Founda- 
tion for Religious Work in State Institutions is operat- 
ing on a budget of $21,267.44. Cooperative work on city, 
state and national levels is growing. 

Christians are at their best, we cannot be reminded 
too often, in prayer. This is aptly expressed in the fa- 
miliar Negro spiritual: "You can talk about me as 
much as you please. I'll talk about you when I get on 



February 3, 1949. 

my knees." The larger spiritual di- 
mensions of Christian living are re- 
vealed in the prayers of our Savior. 
Prayer on high levels, such as the fol- 
lowing by St. Francis, is the key to 
noble living. 

"Lord, make me an instrument of 
Thy peace ; where there is hatred, let 
me sow love; where there is doubt, 
faith ; where there is despair, hope ; 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 

where there is darkness, light; and 
where there is sadness, joy. 

"0 Divine Master, grant that I may 
not so much seek to be consoled as to 
console ; to be understood, as to under- 
stand ; to be loved, as to love ; for it is 
in giving that we receive, it is in par- 
doning that we are pardoned, and it 
is in dying that we are born to eternal 
life." 



What are Mission Boards Expected to Do 
in the Light of Comity? 

By Dr. Stanley U. North, Chairman 
Committee on Comity of the Home Missions Council 



No single factor in modern Prot- 
estantism is of greater importance 
than comity relationships. That is 
true in terms of existing woefully in- 
adequate comity which reflects upon 
the quality of the religion that is pro- 
fessed, seriously discrediting all Prot- 
estantism in the eyes of intelligent 
people. It is especially true, also, in 
terms of the imperative necessity for 
an aggressive, cooperative facing of 
the needs* of the city and of the coun- 
tryside. 

As regards the urban situation, Dr. 
H. Paul Douglass, in a report to the 
Home Missions Council, made the 
following statement, based on numer- 
ous urban studies made of recent 
years under his direction : 

It must be flatly stated the urban church 
stands in a mighty precarious position. 
Many ancient Protestant territorial strong- 
holds have been swept clean of their in- 
stitutions, or their churches reduced to 
mean and dwindling survivals of ancient 
power and glory. It is happily true that 
many of these losses are counter-balanced 
by great gains on the part of new and 
growing suburban churches. But when- 
ever all the factors have been combined 
so as to give an honest total picture of the 
church in a metropolitan community, its 
lot has been revealed as highly uncertain 
and beset with many dangers. 

As regards the rural situation, the 
Master Plan has been helpful, but it 
has not been adequately implemented. 
Too frequently building departments 
act as if they were unrelated to the 
home missionary divisions of their re- 
spective denominations. The o n 1 y 
way to eliminate competitive fields is 
to elimininate them. For salary aid 
to be withdrawn and building aid to 
be granted just doesn't make sense, 
in spite of all a superintendent or a 
bishop may say to the contrary. I 
submit for Protestantism to condone 
a condition in which multiple church 
units exist in small rural communi- 
ties, each of them holding one service 
a month, each of them inadequate in 



terms of preaching, pastoral care and 
program, the buildings in disrepair 
and the grounds in disorder, the con- 
gregation in each case consisting 
largely of the same people, is not only 
indefensible sectarianism, it is more 




REV. STANLEY TJ. NORTH, D. D. 

properly labeled, if I may coin a word, 
sin-tarianism ! Such is a denial rath- 
er than a service to the Kingdom for 
the coming of which we claim to labor. 
It is wasteful. It is inefficient. It 
is ineffective. The primary purpose 
it serves is statistical. 

Comity's crucial problem, however, 
is urban. That is so because of sev- 
eral factors. Since the first census in 
1790 the nation has become increas- 
ingly urban, and since 1920 has been 
predominantly urban. Influential in 
this trend has been industrialization 
which not only led to the expansion of 
urban centers but brought to this 
country through immigration vast 
numbers of laboring - class people 
from southern and eastern Europe 
and elsewhere, a large proportion of 
whom were Roman Catholics. Im- 
migration likewise brought to these 



Page Five. 

shores a large number of Jewish peo- 
ple who also settled in urban centers. 
The Census of Religious Bodies re- 
ports that as of 1936 the Roman 
Catholic Church stood in first place 
among the denominations as to num- 
ber of members in thirty-five states, 
and in second place in four states. 

According to the Christian Herald, 
as of 1947 there were approximately 
46 million Protestants as over against 
25 million Roman Catholics, If you 
can take any pride in that — make the 
most of it, for the fact is that the 46 
million Protestants are divided among 
223 different and distinct denomina- 
tions, and let it be added in much part 
non-cooperating, whereas the Roman 
Catholics not only face the city in its 
totality they face the nation — 25,268,- 
000 strong, with a unified strategy. 

Jewish congregations in 1936 held 
second place as regards number of 
members in five states and third place 
in four states. The Christian Herald 
reports that the Jewish congregations 
numbered 4,600,000 members as of 
1947, making them the fourth largest 
denomination of the nation. This all 
has had a profound influence upon 
neighborhoods and -communities hith- 
erto Protestant. 

In terms of ttrban experience, the 
1936 Census of Religious Bodies re- 
ports that in 41 of the 50 major cities 
of the nation the Roman Catholic 
Church stands first in number of 
members and in three cities stands 
second. Jewish congregations hold 
first place in New York City and sec- 
ond place in eight cities. 

This all has meant not only a 
change in the character of urban 
neighborhoods through the influx of 
industry and commerce, but it has 
meant, too, a change in the cultural 
and economic status. 

Another factor that has had pro- 
found influence upon urban church 
life is the migration of the Negro 
from the South to northern cities. An 
index of this impact upon urban life 
is given in the Census Report of Re- 
ligious Bodies for 1936, in the fact 
that Negro Baptists stood in second 
place in number of churches in seven 
major northern cities, among which 
are Chicago, Detroit and Cleveland 
(the four remaining four cities are : 
St. Louis, Kansas City, Mo., Cincin- 
nati and Youngstown, Ohio) ; and in 
third place in five cities, namely, 
Flint, Dayton, Toledo, Akron and 
Pittsburgh. 

In a recent comity matter a spokes- 
man for a major denomination stated 
that a certain adverse decision was 
(Continued on page 13.) 



Page Six. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 3, 1949. 



CONT RIBU TIONS 



SUFFOLK LETTER. 

Members of the recent Christian 
Workers' Conference held at Elon 
voted commendation of President 
Smith and the college, and of Mrs. E. 
E. Holland, who is establishing a 
foundation for the maintenance of the 
Workers' Conference annually. This 
foundation is a memorial to the late 
Col. E. E. Holland, a founding trus- 
tee of Elon, and for fifty yeax'S a 
faithful member of that body. It is 
good that he is being thus memorial- 
ized. And the Church will be greatly 
blessed by the Christian Workers' 
Conference. 

I was thrilled to see some eight hun- 
dred students, along with their teach- 
ers, and a number of pastors assem- 
bled in the Whitley Memorial Audi- 
torium for many of the sessions. And 
the messages they were hearing Avere 
greatly worth their while. Who can 
estimate the good which was done as 
the Christ was lifted up, the work of 
the Christian emphasized, and youth 
challenged to adventure for righteous- 
ness whatever their calling might be ? 
Dr. Smith and his committee are to be 
congratulated on the men they 
brought there to lead the Conference. 
They were real leaders of Christian 
thought and activities in their 
churches. 

The fellowship and inspiration of 
being on the college campus was most 
enjoyable. Dr. and Mrs. Smith were 
most gracious hosts. Many others of 
the homes about the campus were gra- 
ciously opened to the visitors. I en- 
joyed my stay in the home of Rev. 
Jesse H. Dollar, college and commun- 
ity pastor. Mrs. Dollar was called to 
Alabama to the bedside of her father 
who is quite ill, and so we had bache- 
lor's quarters, although with the many 
sessions of the Conference, and a few 
sessions of committees in between, 
there was not very much time to enjoy 
the restful quiet of the Dollar home. 
Other house guests at that address 
were : Eev. T. Fred Wright, Hender- 
son; Rev. Herbert C. Council, Jr., 
Norfolk ; and Rev. C. Carl Dollar, of 
Sanford. Dr. Rockwell Harmon Pot- 
ter, and Dr. Allen S. Meek, came over 
to visit us (they and the other speak- 
ers were entertained in President and 
Mrs. Smith's home) and wherever 
they w T ent others followed. One 
group of students said to me : "How 
we love to hear them talk ! " I my- 



self esteem it a great privilege to have 
had the opportunity to hear all the 
men who spoke there — Drs. Davies, 
Conover and Greene — and to have be- 
come acquainted with them. I look 
forward to next session during the 
second week in February of next year. 

John G. Truitt. 



PFAFFTOWN CHURCH THRIVING. 

Doubling the average attendance 
at Sunday school and at morning 
church service isn't too easy. The 
Pfafftown Church, however, accom- 
plished this in less than three years. 
From an average attendance of 25 to 
52 in three years are the fig-ures. Due 
credit goes to each worker in the 
church and Sunday school. 

Our Pfafftown Church is located 
ten miles west of Winston-Salem. For 
many years it was just a Sunday 
school and then under the leadership 
of Dr. W. W. J ay, then pastor of our 
Winston-Salem Church, the Sunday 
school was organized into a church. 
During the 1947-48 conference year 
thirteen new members were received 
which was almost one half of the 
church membership. Four have al- 
ready united with the church this 
present conference year. 

Last October we held our revival 
meeting with Rev. Victor Murchison 
of the Winston-Salem Friends 
Church doing the preaching. Great 
interest was manifested and the av- 
erage attendance was 51. 

Leading the Sunday school this 
year is James Cohn, a new member of 
the church. Mr. Cohn's father was a 
Baptist minister and Mr. Cohn is re- 
vealing the excellent training given 
him by his father. Leading the young 
people is Mr. Lee Grubbs, also a mem- 
ber of the church. Each Sunday night 
the group meets with excellent pro- 
grams being planned for three months 
in advance and with an average of 15 
out of 22 members present. 

Like many others the Pfafftown 
Church must take care of its increase. 
Plans are being studied for a complete 
renovation of the present building, 
adding a social and recreation room, 
several Sunday school rooms and re- 
working the present auditorium. 

This past Christmas the young peo- 
ple decided not to exchange gifts 
among themselves. Instead each gave ' 
money to the Christian Orphanage at 
Elon College, amounting to $25. 



If you drive to the mountains in 
North Carolina this Spring and travel 
over Highway No. 421, west out of 
Winston-Salem, watch for the sign, 
"Community Church," and look for 
the church sitting about 300 yards 
from the main highway. You will be 
welcome to attend the services or to 
visit the church building which is al- 
ways open. W. J. Andes. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF NORTH 
CAROLINA AND VIRGINIA 
CONFERENCE. 

Executive — K. D. Register, W. M. 
Stevens, W. J. Andes and S. C. 
Harrell. 

Program — • K. D. Register, W. M. 

Stevens, W. J. Andes, S. C. Harrell 

and pastor of the host church. 
Evangelism — Thurman Bowers, M. V. 

Welch, Joe A. French and J. L. 

Neese. 

Ministry — S. C. Harrell, D. J. Bow- 
den, Ferris Reynolds, W. M. Stev- 

• ens and M. W. Andes. 

Christian Education — Mrs. W. E. 
Wisseman, F. E. Reynolds and Jas. 
Allen. 

Men's Work—W. T. Dunn, G. D. Col- 

clough and W. B. Truitt. 
Social Action — James Allen, William 

Smith, H. S. Smith, D. J. Bowden. 
Ministerial and Church Ethics — Rob- 
ert Woodruff, Jr., Allen Hurdle and 

W. W. Sloan. 
Budget and Apportionment — G. D. 

Colclough, Russell Powell and W. 

E. Walker. 
Foreign Missions — W. M. Stevens, C. 

L. Fields and Joe French. 
Historian — Dr. C. E. Newman. 
Memoirs — Earl Farrell. 
Stewardship—3. H. Dollar, M. W. 

Andes, A. L. Hook and E. D. 

Weed. 

Superannuation — D. R. Fonville, W. 
W. Snyder and C. L. Simpson. 

Religious Literature — W. E. Wisse- 
man, W. W. Sloan and Dr. Wm. T. 
Morgan. 

Home Mission Board and Rural 
Church— W. W. Snyder, Mrs. J. D. 
Strader, W. T. Dunn, Mrs. 0. H. 
Paris, W. M. Stevens, Mrs. Howard 
Gerringer, J. A. French and C. R. 
Wicker. 

Pilgrim Fellowship — Dorothy Bol- 
linger, Bland Leebrick and S. M. 
Andes. 

The first person named on each of 
these committees will act as chairman. 
You will want to contact the members 
of your comittee as soon as possible 
that you may get your work for the 
year under way. 

Kenneth D. Register, Pres. 



February 3, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Seven. 



News of Elon College 

By President L. E. Smith 



CHRISTIAN LIVING. 
IV. In the World. 

By Pres. L. E. Smith. 

We all live in the world but not all 
of us are world citizens. Many of us 
are Christians but not all of us, I fear, 
are world Christians. We have not 
been able to see beyond ourselves and 
our own selfish interests. Too many 
of us are as restricted in our interest, 
or nearly so, as the old man who 
prayed, "God bless me and my wife, 
my son, John, and his wife, us four 
and no more." We know that the 
Christian religion is a world religion 
but we fail to make ourselves or our 
resources available for its world-wide 
expression. We are glad enough to 
enjoy its blessings but fail to give it 
our blessing in its round-the-world 
reaches. 

We feel that our first duty is to the 
needs that are near us — our own home 
and family our own church and local 
community. Does not charity begin 
at home ? Why should I be interested 
in any other church or enterprise since 
my home church needs a new church 
house or the old one is in need of ex- 
tensive repairs, or why should I give 
to the support of other ministers, 
either at home or abroad, when my 
own pastor is underpaid. Others may 
help in these general causes but cer- 
tainly they are not going to help in 
my local church and community. If 
these needs at my own door are met, 
I shall have to help and that quite 
generously. I can express my Chris- 
tian faith at home. This will be my 
share and about all that I can do. 
Others who do not have such respon- 
sibilities at home may give their help 
to causes abroad. 

Some good Christian people express 
themselves after this fashion. They 
are Christians but strictly provincial 
Christians. They have arrived at this 
position by reasoning, selfish reason- 
ing and not by reading Biblical read- 
ings. The Christian religion is de- 
cisively a world religion and the New 
Testament puts the emphasis on the 
world aspect of the Christian relig- 
ion. When God loved He loved the 
whole world. When He gave, He 
gave a gift sufficient for the whole 
world. Because of the gift of Christ, 
His Son, the world may be saved. In 
the days of His flesh He invited all 



men to come unto Him. His prom- 
ises were equal to all, the poor as well 
as the rich. He did not exclude any 
in His affection and the place of sal- 
vation is all inclusive. 

His teachings were world wide. His 
sacrifices were for all men — all classes 
and all countries. When He would 
extend His Kingdom, He placed the 
responsibility upon the hearts of His 
disciples and told them, "Go ye into 
all the world and preach the gospel 
to every creature. ' ' It was obligatory 
upon those to whom He spoke telling 
them to carry the gospel with its love, 
forgiveness, hope and assurance to 
every man. The responsibility is 
equally binding upon every living 
Christian today. We are confronted 
with the task of giving Christianity 
a world wide application and Ave can- 
not evade that task. If we go, we do 
not have to go alone. His presence is 
assured every step of the way and to 
the end of the way. 

As Ave think of Christian living in 
the home, the community, the church, 
and the Avorld, may Ave count it a 
privilege to give the Christian gospel 
a Avorld Avide application through our 
daily living and practices. Chris- 
tianity is the only hope of the world 
and the folloAvers of Christ constitute 
the only hope of giving Christianity 
its world Avide application. 



APPORTIONMENT GIVING. 

There are approximately two hun- 
dred churches in our Southern Con- 
vention. These churches are asked to 
contribute for various causes of the 
denomination including Elon College. 
The apportionment for 1949 has been 
increased $2,500 over that of 1948. 
Our report this Aveek shows a total of 
$115.15. This amount was given by 
one Sunday school and three churches. 
If the other 190-odd churches had 
sent a small contribution the total 
would have been enough. Sometimes 
a church fails to send in a contribu- 
tion because it seems small. No gift 
is too small but too many of our 
churches make no gift at all. There 
is a united budget for the college and 
there is a united appeal for this budg- 
et. If there could be a universal re- 
port there would be no difficulty 
about financing the school. It is sug- 
gested that all of our churches might 
take the matter of the support of the 
college seriously and count it a privi- 
lege rather than a duty. 



Churches. 

Previously reported $ 398.15 

Eastern Va. Conference : 

Damascus S. S 60.00 

Union (South.) 21.00 

N. C. & Va. Conference: 

Hebron 14.15 

Western N. C. Conference : 

High Point, First 20.00 



Total $ 115.15 



Grand total $ 513.30 



A mind once cultivated Avill not lie 
falloAv for half and hour. — Bulwer. 



pillll!lllllll!ll!IIINIII!l!lll!lll!lllllll!!l!lllllllllll!llll^ 

J STANDAART ORGAN CO-, Inc. | 

BUILDERS OF FINE CHURCH PIPE ORGANS 
| Suffolk, Virginia P. O. Box 696 

We gladly submit estimates and drawings for a new 
"Standaart" organ without any obligation on your part. 

1 • I 

When building a new church, we will be only too 
glad to cooperate with your architects in designing the 
organ chambers, without any charge to you. 

I- • 1 

All our instruments are custom-built and guaranteed 
| for a period of twenty years. 

I • | 

Contact our service department for a yearly main- 
tenance contract for/or restoration of your present organ. 
| • 

1 Builders of the four-manual Cathedral Organ in Main 

Street Methodist Church, Suffolk, Virginia. 

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Page Eight. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 




WHAT OUR MISSION DOLLARS DO 
IN THE WEST INDIES. 

By Dr. W. W. Sloan. 

We have all had the experience of 
buying something and discovering we 
haven't got our money's worth. We 
have made poor investments. How 
about the dollars we have put into 
missions? I have visited many for- 
eign mission projects in Asia, Africa 
and South America. Some have been 
better than others, but foreign mis- 
sions as a class appeal to me as the 
best possible investment Christians 
can make. 

How about home missions? I have 
seen a lot of work that comes under 
this title and I have questioned the 
value of some of it. That was one 
reason Mrs. Sloan and I went to 
Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands 
over Christmas. We have come back 
definitely convinced that our invest- 
ments there are good. 

The people of Puerto Rico and the 
Virgin Islands have been called Chris- 
tians for four hundred and fifty years. 
But the Christianity of Puerto Rico 
has been of a very poor type. No 
Protestant work was allowed among 
Puerto Ricans until 1899 when the 
United States had taken over the Is- 
land. Probably any religious group 
that gets a complete monopoly tends 
to degenerate. The Roman Catholic 
Church in the states is a comparative- 
ly good church. Priests have con- 
fessed to me that this is because of 
the competition Protestants give here. 
This is barely becoming tine in the 
West Indies. After fifty years' work 
in Puerto Rico but ten per cent of the 
two and a half million inhabitants are 
Protestant, but. the success of no mis- 
sion can be measured by the number 
of names on the church roll. 

The Roman Church in Puerto Rico 
has been static, doing practically noth- 
ing but conduct formal services in its 
clmrches, which are almost entirely 
located in the cities. Such high fees 
have been charged for baptisms, mar- 
riages and funerals that many people 
who call themselves Roman Catholics 
have managed to get along "without 
benefit of clergy" and have seldom 



if ever been inside a church building. 
Church schools and hospitals were al- 
most unknown. 

Because of medical, educational and 
social services Protestants are bring- 
ing to Puerto Rico, Roman Catholics 
are beginning to serve their people. 
Vigorous American priests are re- 
placing the easy-going Spanish pad- 
res. Roman Catholic "sisters," al- 
most unknown until recently, are serv- 
ing in schools and hospitals. Because 
so many Puerto Rican leaders have 
had their education in the Protestant 
Polytechnic Institute the Roman 
Church started a little college at 
Ponce last fall which one over-en- 
thusiastic gentleman told me "will 
soon have more than seven thousand 
students." A "Boys' Town" in imi- 
tation of the Nebraska institution of 
that name is being established. 

Recently I mentioned discovering 
congregational singing at a Roman 
Catholic mass. This is but one of the 
influences our approach to Christi- 
anity has had on the Roman Church. 
Clubs and societies are being organ- 
ized in imitation of similar activity 
in Protestant churches. Making the 
church that was already in Puerto 
Rico more Christian is possibly the 
chief task of Protestant missions. 
However th,at is a continuous process. 
If we should withdraw, the Roman 
Church would soon slide back where 
it was. The Roman Church has done 
very little for the hundreds of thou- 
sands of rural Puerto Ricans. Some 
time ago the Episcopalians established 
a country church and social service 
center. Soon the Roman Catholics 
built a similar plant across the road. 
With such great need in the Island the 
Episcopalians decided they could be 
of greater service where the Romans 
were inactive, so moved on to another 
needy spot, This had hardly been 
done when the Roman Catholics closed 
up their project, leaving the first com- 
munity with no help of any kind. 

Puerto Ricans who have become 
Protestant are enthusiastic about their 
religion. They don't take it for 
granted. It means much to them. 
Would Protestants here were as en- 



Feiruary 3, 1949. 

I 

thusiastic! The Island Protestants / 
know that emphasis upon the abun- 
dant life for all people and following 
the example of Jesus brings far great- 
er satisfaction than worshipping a 
church. They find a living Christ 
rather than the figure on a crucifix. 

Puerto Rican Protestants are more 
world-minded in their religion than 
are many members of the Southern j 
Convention. They want to know what 
Christianity is doing in other parts j 
of the world. They know what this 
religion has meant for them and they 
want to share it with others. They 
are sending the good news beyond 
their own Island. We found a group 
who had sent one of their members to 
the mountains of Peru as a missionary ] 
and are now helping to finance the 
task of bringing a vital Christianity 
to the Peruvians, despite their own 
poverty. They know no one can keep 
real Christianity to himself ; it has to 
be shared. 

In contrast to Pureto Rico the in- 
habitants of the Virgin Islands have 
nearly all been Protestants — Morav- 
ians and Lutherans. The sugar and 
rum industries in the Virgin Islands 
have been "going on the rocks" leav- 
ing many of the people there unem- j 
ployed and impoverished. They do 
not need to be "converted" but their 
churches do need help from the states. 
There are no Congregational Chris- " 
tian Churches there- — none are need- 
ed — but as patriotic Americans we 
should take an interest in the people 
of these little islands, people whose 
language was English long before we 
bought, the Virgin Islands from Den- 
mark in 1917. 

Our mission dollars spent in the 
West Indies are proving an excellent 
investment for the Kingdom of God. 



VETERAN CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY 
PASSES. 

Rev. Alonzo D. Woodworth, D. D., 
for 39 years a missionary of the Chris- 
tian Church in Japan, died January 
11, 1949, at Merom, Indiana. Dr. 
Woodworth first went to Japan in 
September, 1892, and spent the great- 
er part, of his years in Tokyo. He was 
a graduate of Oberlin College with 
a. D. D. from Union Christian College 
in Merom. When he left Japan for 
the last time the Japan Advertiser 
said, "He was a man who devoted his 
entire life to straightforward evan- 
gelism." At times Dr. Woodworth 
often preached in the streets to thou- 
sands. He never sought for any ma- 
terial accomplishment which might 
(Continued on page 15.) 



February 3, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Nine. 



Church Women at Work 

With Emphasis on Missions 

Mrs. W. J. Andes, Editor 
637 !S. Sunset Drive, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



SCHOOL OF MISSIONS. 

We will have a School of Missions 
this summer — probably the last of 
June — at Elon College. Plans are be- 
ing made to combine the Biennial 
Meeting of the Southern Convention 
Women and the School of Missions so 
that both will be held in the same 
week. This would make it possible 
for more people to attend both. The 
School of Missions this year will be 
for only the women, including' study 
courses about our emphases for next 
year. We hope that many women will 
be able to come and spend the week at 
Elon. Definite announcements will be 
made later. 



THE YOUNGEST SOCIETY 
PRESIDENT. 

Mrs. Lester has received three nom- 
inations for the youngest Society 
President and all three are the same 
age ! These nominations are from 
High Point, Pleasant Grove, N. C, 
and Monticello. 

Maybe your society has a president 
who is younger than these three. If 
you think so, send her name to Mrs. 
Lester. 



SPRING RALLIES. 

Get ready for Spring Rallies — they 
will be here before we know it. Dates 
are March 30, 31, April 1, 2, 3. 



WORLD DAY OF PRAYER. 

For a record attendance at your 
World Day of Prayer service educate 
your community now — use film strips 
to bring to life the missions projects 
of the World Bay of Prayer. Between 
now and the first Friday in Lent, the 
World Day of Prayer, arrange for 
showing a film strip in your church. 

1. March of Missions — A unified 
presentation of World Day of 
Prayer projects at home and 
overseas. Purchase price, $2.00. 
Write to : Home Missions Coun- 
cil of North America, 297 Fourth 
Avenue, New York 10, N. Y. 

2. Back of the Harvest, Indian 
Schooldays, Sharecropper Story 
— A picture of the work we do 
together on the home mission 
field. Rental : For the set of 3, 
$1.00. Write to : Home Missions 



Council of North America, 297 
Fourth Avenue, New York 10, 
N. Y. 

3. Vellore University and, Medical 
College, China Colleges, Tokyo 
Woman's 'Christian College — The 
story of Christian colleges for 
women in the Orient. Rental: 
For the set of 3, fl.00. Write to : 
United Council of Church Wom- 
en, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York 
10, N. Y. 

QUARTERLY REPORT. 

The following is the quarterly re- 
port of the Virginia Valley Woman's 
Missionary Conference for the second 
quarter ending January 5, 1949 : 



Oct. 15— Mt. Olivet (G), Shaowu $ 5.00 

Nov. 6 — Winchester, Dues 27.00 

Nov. 22— New Hope, Dues 4.10 

Dec. 1— Linville, Dues 21.50 

Dec. 1 — Linville, Thank Offering 23.23 
Dec. 8 — Wood's Chapel, Unseen 

Guest Offering 25.25 

Dec. 19— Winchester, Thank Of- 
fering 41.00 

Dec. 28— Newport, Thank Offer- 
ing 16.00 

Dec. 28— Newport, Dues 14.25 

Dec. 29 — Leaksville, War Victims 7.80 
Dec. 29 — Leaksville, Thank Offer- 
ing 25.75 

Dec. 29 — Leaksville, Dues 15.20 

Dec. 29 — Leaksville, Shaowu . . . 10.00 

Young People. 

Dec. 9 — Linville, Thank Offering 14.65 

Dec. 18— Antioch, Thank Offering 75.00 

Dec. 18 — Antioch, Dues 7.20 

Dec. 18 — Winchester, Thank Of- 
fering 10.00 

Dec. 30 — Antioch, on Thank Of- 
fering 2.00 

Juniors. 

Nov. 22 — New Hope, Dues .60 

Dee, 8— Wood's Chapel, Thank 

Offering 1.00 



Jan. 5 — Sent to Mrs. Leathers . $ 346.53 



Mrs. N. F. Patnter, 

Treasurer. 



FINANCIAL REPORT. 

The following is the financial report 
of the Woman's Home and Foreign 
Mission Board of the Eastern Vir- 
ginia Conference for quarter ending- 
December 31, 1948 : 

Balance on hand last report .... $ 144.09 

RECEIPTS. 
Offering — Women's Meet- 
ing, October 7 $ 77.01 

Offering — Young People's 

Meeting, October 24 . . 84.40 

161.41 



Women's Societies. 

(On Apportionment.) 



Antioch $18.32 

Berea (Nansemond) .... 25.00 

Berea (Great. Bridge) . . . 20.00 

Bethlehem 45.00 

Cypress Chapel 25.00 

Cypress Chapel (Agnes 

Brittle Circle) 20.00 

Dendron 16.65 

Eure 12.00 

Franklin 75.00 

Holland 40.00 

Holy Neck 37.50 

Isle of Wight 25.00 

Liberty Spring 51.00 

Mt. Carmel 15.46 

Mt. Zion 7.50 

New Lebanon 6.30 

Newport News 30.00 

Norfolk : 

Bay View 18.75 

Christian Temple 87.50 

First 18.75 

Little Creek 6.25 

Rosemont 50.20 

Second (For Sept. 15) 6.00 

Second 20.00 

Oak Grove 9.60 

Oakland 18.75 

Portsmouth : 

First 13.00 

Slielton Memorial 40.00 

Shelton Memorial 

(Young Women) . . . 10.00 

Richmond, First 12.00 

South Norfolk .'. 25.00 

Spring Hill (For Sept. 15) 2.50 

Spring Hill 2.50 

Suffolk 162.50 

Suffolk (Staley Society) . 39.40 

Sunbury, Damascus 25.00 

Union (South.) 11.00 

Wakefield 24.70 

Waverly 13.75 

Windsor 45.87 

1,132.75 

Young People. 

Berea (Nansemond) ....$ 9.00 

Bethlehem 25.00 

Burton's Grove 8.00 

Cypress Chapel 15.00 

Dendron 5.00 

Eure 4.00 

Franklin 6.25 

Holland 4.00 

Holy Neck 10.00 

Liberty Spring 15.00 

Liberty Spring (For Sept. 

15) 5.00 

Mt. Carmel 5.00 

Newport News 8.00 

Newport News (High 

School Group) 3.00 

Norfolk : 

Bay View 1.25 

Christian Temple 8.00 

Little Creek 2.00 

Oak Grove 2.20 

Oakland 8.75 

Portsmouth, First 6.00 

Richmond, First 2.00 

Suffolk ; 15.00 

Sunbury, Damascus 5.00 

Union (South.) 5.00 

Windsor 10.00 

187.95 

Juniors. 

Berea (Nans.) $ 6.25 

Bethlehem 3.00 



(Continued on page 14.) 



Page Ten. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 3, 1949. 



Youth at Work in the Church 

Ann Truitt, Editor; Helen Jackson, C. B. Twiddy, Assoiates. 



GREENSBORO (FIRST) REPORTS. 

The past weeks have been filled with 
work by the two groups of young peo- 
ple of the Greensboro, First, Church. 
The following report of their activi- 
ties has been made : 

The High School Group (Fun 'n 
Fellowship) has made a study of 
Puerto Rico (our Home Mission 
Study for this year) and they have 
had some interesting projects in con- 
nection with their study. This group 
sponsored a Sunday evening service, 
showing "Puerto Rican Story." In 
addition to their apportioned mis- 
sionary giving, they have raised $30 
to send two goats to Rev. Howard 
Spragg in Puerto Rico. Not only have 
they learned more about Peurto Rico, 
but they have shared their knowl- 
edge with others and have shared 
their money with people of Puerto 
Rico. 

Just before Christmas, this same 
group gave a play entitled ' ' Christ- 
mas Voice." The offering taken at 
the play was sent to purchase a radio 
for Timothy Chang, who, most of us 
know, is the student studying at Duke 
Divinity School from our Shaowu 
Mission in China. 

The Pilgrim Stewards are the young 
people of the Greensboro, Firs t, 
Church who are out of high school. 
They, too, have been working hard. 
This group was in charge of the an- 
nual open house for the members of 
the congregation following one of the 
pre - Christmas p r o g r a m s of the 
church. Their Christmas offering was 
used to send a CARE package to a 
German pastor. 

Together these two groups enjoyed 
a carolling trip on Sunday night be- 
fore Christmas. This, also, is an un- 
usual event at which time the groups 
sing for the shut-ins of the church. 

We, here at the Convention Office, 
are delighted to receive reports of 
group activities, such as the above. If 
your group has done anything that 
you would like to tell others about, 
just write to one of the editors of the 
Young People 's Page at Elon College, 
N. G, or just send your article to the 
Southern Convention Office. We will 
see that it gets to The Christian Sun 
and also in Youth Outreach, the Sou- 
thern Convention Young People 's 
Newsletter. 



"Puerto Rican Story," mentioned 
above, is available for loan from the 
Southern Convention Office, if any 
group would like to use it. Be sure to 
write well in advance of the date you 
wish it in order that it may be re- 
served for you. 

Remember, this Young People 's 
Page is for our use. Let's fill it as 
often as possible. Send in your re- 
ports and Ave will see that they are 
printed. 



TO THE YOUNG PEOPLE OP 
EASTERN VIRGINIA. 

It has been a pleasure to work with 
the young people in our churches. I 
feel that I am somewhat familiar with 
the young people's work and that I 
already know a number of the young 
leaders in the conference. And I ex- 
pect to know a larger number before 
the year is over. 

In looking over the confeernce as a 
unit there are a number of of arrest- 
ing and startling facts. Let me call 
your attention a few : 

Last year our young people's or- 
ganization contributed $1,119. Fine 
for finances ! But are we getting the 
equivalent in spiritual values, in men- 
tal and character development? Let 
us not put too much emphasis on 
raising money. That is only a secon- 
dary and minor factor. Our primary 
aims and major objectives are devel- 
oping leadership for church work, 
teaching the right attitudes toward 
Christian living, character develop- 
ment, and interest in furthering the 
work of the Kingdom. 

And here is a puzzle. In our East- 
ern Virginia Conference only 31 of 
our 43 churches have youth organiza- 
tions. Isn't that surprising? Why, 
how and what are the big questions. 
Why are there 12 churches in our con- 
ference without youth organizations? 
How can this situation be changed ? 
Is your church one of the 12? If so, 
what can we do to help you organize 
a, youth group in your church ? Your 
superintendent feels there should be 
an active, growing, progressive, or- 
ganized youth group in every church. 

Of our 31 organized groups are 
there not many improvements that 
can be made I Is your group as active 
as it should be? Is your attendance 
record the best you can make it ? Are 
your programs inspirational and in- 



teresting? Look around you, aren't 
there other young people you might 
invite to your meetings and interest 
in joining the work? 

Begin making plans now to have 
your group represented at the Pil- 
grim Fellowship Rally to be held the 
last of February at Liberty Spring. 
Watch The Sun for the date. Other 
information will be sent to the key 
worker in your church. We hope to 
have the youth of every church well 
represented. Don't miss this meeting. 
There is a big treat in store. 

Before closing let me say that if at 
any time I can help you in any way 
just let me know. It will be* a pleas- 
ure. 

Mrs. R. E. Brittle. 

R. F. D. No 1, 

Suffolk, Va. 



An extensive observance of Youth 
Week is in progress at our Newport 
News (Va. ) Church this week. 



EASTERN VIRGINIA LEADER- 
SHIP SCHOOLS. 
(Continued from page 3.) 
Rev. J. F. Morgan, Rev. R. E. Brittle, 
Dr. Luther Grice, Dr. I. W. Johnson, 
Dr. Will B. O'Neill, and Rev. B. H. 
Watkins. 

The cooperating churches in the 
Suffolk Area School will be : Anti- 
och, Berea (Nans. ), Bethlehem 
(Nans.), Cypress Chapel, Damascus, 
Eure, Franklin, Holland, Holy Neck, 
Isle of Wight, Johnson's Grove, Lib- 
erty Spring, Mt. Carmel, Mt. Zion, 
Oak Grove Oakland, Suffolk, Union 
(South.) and Windsor. 

All teachers and officers of our Sun- 
day schools of Eastern Virginia, to- 
gether with other interested people in 
the work of the Sunday school are 
urged to plan to attend these Leader- 
ship Training Schools. 

A Short Course Leadership Train- 
ing School will be arranged for the 
Wakefield-Waverly Area later. 

Vacation Bible School Institutes are 
being arranged for February 24-27, 
as follows: February 24 — Norfolk 
Area, Norfolk, Second Church; Feb- 
ruary 25 — Suffolk Area, Suffolk ; Feb- 
ruary 27 — Wakefield-Waverly Area. 

Wm. T. Scott, 
Siiperintendent. 



Ministers of the Western North 
Carolina Conference held their regu- 
lar monthly meeting at the Asehboro 
church on January 17. Plans for the 
fifth Sunday institute were completed. 
Discussion of possible pastorate 
grouping was continued, and the pro- 
gram of the C. M. A. considered. 



February 3, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Eleven. 



THE MID- WINTER MEETING. 

Nine national and international 
boards, conferences and affiliated com- 
mittees of the Congregational Chris- 
tian Churches in America are meeting 
in Cleveland, Ohio, February 3 thru 
10 for consideration of their unified 
ministry to the churches of America 
and their world-wide parish. Their 
headquarters will be the Cleveland 
Hotel. These .are working confer- 
ences bringing together some 300 ex- 
ecutives, board members and key lay 
and clerical leaders of the denomina- 
tion from all parts of the country. 

Distinguished United Nations Mem- 
Member to Speak. 

The Missions Council sessions, run- 
ning from Monday night, February 7 
to Thursday noon, February 10, begin 
with a Fellowship Dinner, Monday 
evening, at which the speaker will be 
Hon. Dr. Charles Malik, Ph. D., Leb- 
anese Minister to the United States, 
Chief of the Lebanese Delegation to 
the United Nations and President of 
the Social and Economic Council of 
the United Nations. It was under Dr. 
Malik's leadership that the history- 
making Declaration of Human Rights 
was accepted recently by the United 
Nations. His subject will be, "Prob- 
lems Confronting the Christian 
World." 

The Chaplain of the Missions Coun- 
cil meetings will be Rev. R. Norris 
Wilson of New York City, Associate 
Minister of the Missions Council. The 
Presiding Officer will be Rev. Albert 
J. Penner, of Holvoke, Mass., Chair- 
man of the Missions Council. The 
meetings are under the general direc- 
tion of Dr. A. D. Stauffacher, New 
York City, Minister and Executive 
Secretary of the Missions Council. 

Among the highlights of the ses- 
sions will be an American Board 
luncheon on Tuesday, February 8, at 
12:30 at which the speaker will be 
Luther R. Fowle of Istanbul, Turkey, 
a, resident of that land under three 
regimes and Agent and Treasurer of 
the American Board Near East Mis- 
sion. Mr. Fowle, who is the father of 
Farnsworth Fowle, CBS overseas cor- 
respondent, will speak on ' ' Issues 
Confronting America" in the Near 
jtnd Middle East." 

Another feature Avill be the pre- 
miere of a new sound color film en- 
itled, "We Would Be Building," a 
jnoving picture professionally filmed 
pi the site of a new high potential 
(ihurch at Silver Spring, Md. The 
;.Larrator is Ernest Chappell, well 
I'jiown network announcer. The film 



will first be shown on Tuesday eve- 
ning, February 8. 

A unique method of giving informa- 
tion and inspiration is being used at 
this Mid-Winter Meeting. Three 
"Town Meetings" have been set up 
in which a panel of thoroughly in- 
formed men and women will speak 
after which the entire Missions Coun- 
cil will participate in an open forum. 

The first "Town Meeting" is on 
Tuesday, February 8, at 2 :00 with the 
subject, "The State of the Church in 
Our World." Dr. Fred Field Good- 
sell will conduct the forum. His team 
of speakers will include : Herman F. 
Reissig, New York City, discussing 
the East- West situation; Miss Alice 
C. Reed, just back from North China, 
discussing Communism in China; 
President Hiroshi Hatanaka of Kobe 
College, Kobe, Japan ; Dr. Henry Lit- 
tle, Jr., of the Philippine Islands; 
and Dr. Nelson C. Dreier of Los An- 
geles, Calif., speaking on Mexico. 

The second "Town Meeting" comes 
Tuesday evening, February 8 on the 
subject, "The Relevancy of Our Mes- 
sage to Our World." It is under the 
direction of Dr. Douglas Horton, New 
York City, with Dr. John C. Bennett, 
Professor of Christian Ethics at Un- 
ion Seminary, New York, making the 
main address. The third "Town 
Meeting" comes Wednesday afternoon 
February 9, on the subject, "The" 
Program of Our Churches for Our 
World" and will be under the direc- 
tion of Dr. A. D. Stauffacher of New 
York. 

The Biennium emphasis of the Con- 
gregational Christian Churches is 
Christian Stewardship and W ednes- 
day evening, February 9 will be de- 
voted to that subject. The speaker 
will be Dr. William C. Jones, Presi- 
dent of Whittier College, Whittier, 
Calif., and Chairman of the General 
Council Stewardship Commission. 

Important Pre-Sessicn Luncheon. 

The annual luncheon of the Congre- 
gational Christian Division of Church 
Extension and Evangelism will come 
Monday noon, February 7, at 12 :30 in 
the Hotel Cleveland, with the follow- 
ing roster of speakers. Rev. Donald 
L. Benedict, minister of the "store- 
front" project in East Harlem, New 
York, speaking on, ' ' The Church Dis- 
covering the City 's Forgotten Men ; ' ' 
Rev. Stanley M. Sargent, of Roches- 
ter, Minn., ex-Navy Chaplain and now 
Congregational Chaplain related to 
the Mayo Clinic, subject, "The 
Church 's Ministry to the Sick ; ' ' Rev. 
Joseph H. Evans, minister of Mt. 
Zion Church, Cleveland, Ohio, on 



"The Negro and His Church in the 
Urban North ; ' ' Rev. Fred Hoskins of 
Des Moines, Iowa r on "The Urban 
Church and Parish Evangelism;" 
Rev. Kenneth E. Seim of Minneapolis, 
Minn., on "A Church Is Born;" and 
Miss Helen Kenyon of New York, 
Moderator of the General Council on 
' ' Seeing Is Believing. ' ' 

Other Important Pre-Session 
Meetings. 

Among other important pre-session 
meetings will be that of the Congrega- 
tional Christian Directors of Relig- 
ious Education meeting February 3 
to 6 in the Hotel Cleveland. Among 
their leaders will be Dr. Harry Emer- 
son Stock of Boton, Mass., General 
Secretary of t h e Congregational 
Christian Division of Christian Edu- 
cation ; Rev. Virgil E. Foster of Grin- 
nell, Iowa, Director of Religious Edu- 
cation for the Congregational Confer- 
ence of Iowa ; Rev. Oliver Powell of 
Chicago, 111., National Secretary of 
Young People 's Work ; Miss Mildred 
Widber, Children's Work Secretary, 
Miss Merle Easton and Miss Grace 
Storm, national youth workers. 

From February 3 to 7 the Congre- 
gational Christian State Superinten- 
dents from all parts of the United 
States will meet under the direction 
of Dr. Robert Bruce of New York 
City, to discuss policies and prob- 
lems related to all phases of church 
work. They will meet in the Hotel 
Cleveland with the exception of Sat- 
urday night, February 5 when they 
will hold their annual dinner at 6 :30 
in the headquarters of the Ohio Con- 
gregational Christian Conference, 
3056 Prospect Avenue, Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

The speakers at the Superinten- 
dent's Dinner will be Dr. Frederick 
L. Fagley of New York City, Associ- 
ate General Secretary Emeritus of the 
General Council of the Congregation- 
al Christian Churches, ' speaking on, 
"The Development of the Ministry 
in Our Churches," and Dr. Fred S. 
Buschmeyer of New York, n e w 1 y 
elected Associate Minister of the Gen- 
eral Council, who will speak on, ' ' The 
Relevancy of the Ecumenical Move- 
ment to the Congregational Minis- 
try." 

The women State Presidents from 
coast to coast will meet from Satur- 
day, February 5, through Monday, 
February 7, under the guidance of 
Mrs. Clarence L. Murdey of Seattle, 
Wash. 

The women State Presidents will 
discuss ways of promoting the work 
(Coneinued on page 15.) 



Page Twelve. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



'February 3, 1949. 



Sunday School Lesson 

By Rev. H. S. Hardcastlb, D. D. 



JESUS FACES OPPOSITION. 

Lesson VII — February 13, 1949. 

Memory Selection : Do not be over- 
come by evil, but overcome with 
good. — Romans 12:21. 

Lesson : Mark 2 :l-3 :6. 

Devotional Reading : 11 :37-46. 

The Servant is not Above 
His Master. 
They critized our Lord. Do not be 
surprised if they critize you. No 
matter how much good you do, or how 
hard you try to do right, somebody 
will critize you. You might as well 
accept that as a fact of life. And it 
is not all to the bad either. Some 
criticism is to be ignored, but much 
criticism can be turned to profit. 
Alas for the man who resents all crit- 
icism and is unwilling to profit by 
fair criticism, sincerely offered. The 
servant is not above his lord, and if 
people criticized Jesus they will crit- 
icize us. Today's lesson presents a 
series of criticisms brought against 
our Lord Jesus Christ. 

Criticism Number One. 
The Master's fame was beginning 
to grow and to spread. Thus it was 
that when He came quietly into Ca- 
pernaum, it soon became known that 
He was in the house and a great 
crowd gathered to hear Him. In the 
midst of His discourse, there was a 
knocking and a scratching on the roof 
of the flat-topped house, a big open- 
ing appeared, and behold a man suf- 
fering with palsy or paralysis was let 
down on a pallet immediately in 
front of Jesus. Sensing a spirit of 
faith in the men, the four friends of 
the man as well as the man himself, 
the Master said "Son, thy sins be 
forgiven thee." That sent the blood 
pressure of the scribes and Parisees 
soaring. "Who can forgive sins but 
Cod only?" they asked aghast at 
such blasphemy. Well after all it- 
was God who had forgiven the sins of 
the man, God in the person of His Son 
Jesus Christ. That was one of the 
tragedies of the situation — He came 
unto His own and His own received 
Him not. As a token of His right 
and His power to forgive sins, our 
Lord commanded the man to take his 
bed, or pallet, and to walk. The inner 
experience was validated by an ex- 
ternal action. How trivial and tragic 



it all seems, this criticism of the 
scribes. Here was a man paralyzed 
and helpless, restored again to acti- 
vity and useful and gainful trade, 
and here were religious leaders who 
should have known better, criticizing 
our Lord and questioning His right 
on earth to forgive sins. But there 
are many of their ilk today, who 
strain at a gnat and swallow a camel. 

Criticism Number Two. 

Jesus knew what was in man. He 
saw men, not only as they were, but 
as they could become. Thus it was 
that as He passed by the tax collec- 
tor's place of business, He called Levi 
or Matthew to follow Him and to be- 
come His disciple. And Matthew rose 
up and followed Him. He thereupon 
"threw a big party" in honor of the 
occasion and invited many of his 
friends to meet the Master Who was 
the honored guest. But as Jesus sat 
down to the big dinner, the scribes and 
Pharisees criticized Him because He 
was eating with publicans and sinners. 
It "just wasn't the thing to do" to 
eat with these people who really be- 
longed on the other side of the tracks. 
It was beneath the dignity of the 
Master and outside the pale of real 
religion, they thought or intimated. 
With delicate irony and with deadly 
directness the Master calmly replied 
that as a matter of fact the folks who 
were well did not need a physcian, but 
only the folks who were sick. At any 
rate these publicans and sinners had 
a sense of need, a sense of failure and 
a desire for mercy, but the self-right- 
eous scribes and Pharisees were smug 
and self-satisfied. One thing is cer- 
tain, you can't help a man much if 
you stay. at arm's length from him. 
Missionaries and social workers must 
share the lives of those whom they 
would save. 

Criticism Number Three. 

Horror of horrors, here were the 
disciples of this unauthorized — by 
them of course — teacher, who evident- 
ly paid no attention to the rules of 
fasting of organized religion. Didn't 
this free-lance teacher know what was 
good form, what the Emily Post book 
of religious etiquette said about the 
matter of fasting? Yes, He knew. 
Fasting was to be the outward expres- 
sion of an inner spirit. There would 
come a time when His disciples would 



feel like putting on sackcloth and 
ashes and fasting as an expression of 
their inner mood. But now, now in 
the new joy that they had found in 
companionship with the Master, well 
to fast now would be like folks at a 
wedding fasting, putting on sack- 
cloth and ashes and wearing a long 
face. It was a plea for sincerity in 
religion, for genuiness in religious 
practices. There was to be no window 
dressing in the religion of Jesus. In- 
ner spirit was to mean more than out- 
ward form and ceremony. 

Criticism Number Four. 
The next criticism of Jesus by the 
scribes and Pharisees shows how far 
the letter can kill, as oposed to the 
spirit which can make alive. The Sab- 
bath was for the Jews a sacred day, a 
holy day. It had been made such by 
the law of Moses. Had not God com- 
manded men to keep it holy, and on it 
to do no work? Well the religious 
leaders took the thing literally. And 
they buttressed it with hundreds of 
rules and regulations, so petty and 
burdensome that they had made a 
mockery of the Sabbath. That which 
was meant to be a boon had become a 
burden, that which was meant to give 
wings to life had become a weight. 
Thus it was that on one Sabbath day 
as the disciples walked with the Mas- 
ter through a field of growing grain, 
they plucked some of the heads of 
wheat or barley, and scruffing out the 
grain with their hands, they ate it. 
(The writer of these Notes recalls how 
as a boy he used to eat wheat thus 
threshed from the heads of growing 
grain in the fields.) But alas, in do- 
ing this simple act, the disciples had 
broken the sacred law of the Sabbath, 
they had worked, they had threshed 
grain on the Sabbath Day. And again 
with patience that awakens amaze- 
ment in many of us, the Master quiet- 
ly reminded them that on at least one 
occasion in their history a man, not a 
priset, had eaten the shewbread which 
it was unlawful for anybody but the 
priest to eat, thus establishing the 
fact the human needs take precedence 
over ceremonial law and even over 
institutions. Then the Master added 
a statement that embodied an aiding 
principle for all time. Man was not 
made for the Sabbath, but the Sab- 
bath was made for men, for the high- 
est interest of man, physically, men- 
tally, socially and spiritually. He 
further proclaimed that He was Lord 
also of the Sabbath Day. Even in our 
modern world the law recognizes 
works of necessity and works of mer- 
( Continued on page 15.) 



February 3, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Thirteen. 



IN THE LIGHT OF COMITY 
AGREEMENTS. 
(Continued from page 5.) 

merely advisory and that his denomi- 
nation was perfectly free to do as it 
pleased with reference to the question 
at issue. He was quite right. Prot- 
estantism is entirely free to ruthless- 
ly compete to waste its heritage, to 
impoverish the community and to 
discredit itself in the eyes of thought- 
ful men. If the gentleman in ques- 
tion had been more concerned for the 
Kingdom than he was for his career, 
he would have recognized that it is the 
difficult cases that make or break com- 
ity relations and procedure. One de- 
serves no credit for being in favor of 
comity when nothing it as stake. 

Since 1940 more than nine and one- 
third million of people have been add- 
ed to the urban population. This 
means a vast number of new com- 
munities needing to be churched. 
There are plenty of opportunities for 
all. The task is colossal. The need 
is for a comprehensive plan for every 
city based on carefully made surveys. 
Denominational nostalgia is no good 
reason for establishing yet another 
church in any community and certain- 
ly not in a community already over- 
church. Furthermore, for any de- 
nomination to think that it must be 
represented in every region, in every 
community, in every neighborhood, ir- 
respective of the representation or the 
extension programs of other denomi- 
nations, is highly presumptuous. It 
is untenable on theological grounds. 
It is indefensible as a matter of Chris- 
tian brotherhood. It is the negation 
of a Protestant startegy. It is high 
time that the major denominations 
stopped paying lip service to comity 
and begin practicing it — first, by 
whole-hearted cooperation in develop- 
ing urban master plans that stem from 
all the facts, carefully gathered, an- 
alyzed and appraised; second, by ac- 
cepting comity decisions, be they what 
they may, both in letter and in spirit. 

They may be advisory, and they 
may hurt, but understand this, that 
the more they hurt, compliance there- 
to strengthens comity, enhances the 
prestige of the Council of Churches 
and has in it the promise that Protes- 
tantism is on the way to fulfilling its 
responsibility to the community. 

The role of the National Boards in 
the current situation is of utmost im- 
portance. The Boards simply can- 
not plead lack of power and control 
in the face of comity violations. If 
the Boards are really sincere in the 
matter of comity, forthright policy 



statements, which make comity clear- 
ances prerequisite to the receipt of 
national aid of any kind, will go a 
long way toward strengthening com- 
ity practices in terms of the field. The 
fact that a lot has been purchased 
without first securing comity consent 
for the location, on the theory that 
comity decisions are after all only ad- 
visory, or as a matter of ignorance of 
good manners in such affairs, is no 
justification for national aid. The 
fact that a cellar has been excavated 
and a foundation laid is no good rea- 
son for national aid to a church that 
has flagrantly ignored comity proced- 
ures. So long as the Boards yield to 
pressure and threats from the field, 
comity will be observed more by its 
breach than by its observance. The 
Boards can, if they are of a mind to 
do so, lift the matter of comity to the 
level of morality where it belongs. 

Protestantism's basic responsibility 
is to adequately church every com- 
munity across the nation. This Cj»n 
be done only by intelligent planning 
issuing in strong individual units. 
Such is the only adequate answer to 
non-cooperating communions. For 
surely the cure of a little chaos is not 
more of the same. 

Possibly, it is in the inner - city 
where our atomized life is most defi- 
cient. It is one of the anomalies of 
traditional church experience that the 
response to the foreign missionary en- 
terprise is one of great generosity 
while challenging missionary oppor- 
tunities stand at the very doorsteps 
of great city churches and are met 
only with apathy. To be sure, a wide 
economic and cultural gulf frequently 
separates the members of a church 
from its neighbors. But just what 
is the function of a church? Is it to 
give one social status, or is it to relate 
lives, privileged and underprivileged, 
to the Supreme Life ? A church can- 
not bear a valid Christian witness un- 
less it first be Christian. 

In the last analysis the problem 
centers in the will to cooperate. The 
larger denominations have the power 
to lead the way. Their influence can 
be exercised in the strengthening of 
the councils of churches. They can 
witness for sound comity procedures. 
They can lift comity into aggressive, 
positive action that has about it a 
moral imperative. Ultimately, the 
Roman Catholic Church will compel 
us to merge our lives and strength in 
order to exist. It will be wise and 
statesmanlike for us to cooperate 
wholeheartedly now for the sake of the 
cause we seek to serve, lest failing to 
do so we also lose our birthright. 



If this which I have been saying 
has validity, the Home Missions Coun- 
cil might well pass a series of resolu- 
tions along the following lines: 

1. RESOLVED : That the Committee for 
Cooperative Field Research be requested 
to initiate immediately a study of com- 
ity practices of the city councils 
throughout the nation ; that where weak- 
nesses are discovered conferences be ar- 
ranged, with a view to establishing city- 
wide Protestant startegies, undergirded 
by sound comity procedures ; that in sit- 
uations in which any of the constituent 
denominations of the Home Missions 
Council are non-cooperative in comity 
matters, corrective steps be taken on the 
local level; if unsuccessful, then on the 
national level. 

2. RESOLVED : That the constituent de- 
nominations of the Home Missions Coun- 
cil be requested to adopt the policy of 
making comity clearances prerequisite 
to the granting of national building and 
leadership aid ; that the non-constituent 
Boards be invited to adopt the same 
policy in the interest of an effective 
chtfrching of the city; that the list of 
the Boards taking this action be periodi- 
cally published. 

3. RESOLVED: That overtures be made 
to the Federal Council of Churches for 
a joint study of the feasibility of ap- 
proaching the constituent denominations 
of the two councils with the proposal 
that some generic and inclusive name, 
such as the United Protestant Church of 
Christ be used by each of the denomina- 
tions and their local churches, with the 
traditional legal name in parenthesis, 
with a view to creating a Protestant 
concern and a Protestant strategy for 
an adequate churching of both urban 
and rural life. 

This third resolution will, if imple- 
mented, run into considerable, if not 
insurmountable, resistance. And yet 
it merely describes in two or three 
words that for which comity stands 
and to which we so easily subscribe in 
theory. 

A fourth and final resolution might 
be the following : 

4. RESOLVED : That the constituent 
Boards of the Home Missions Council 
be requested to set up the essential ma- 
chinery for a fresh study of the rubral 
church, with a view to an aggressive 
exchange of fields, thereby reducing the 
number of units in any one community, 
with the possibility of full-time resident 
ministries and enriched programs for 
the numerous communities which are 
now impoverished by a competitive de- 
nominationalism which presumes to 
speak in the name of Christ, but which 
practices not brotherhood toward those 
who bear His name. 

Let me conclude this address by 
quoting two sentences from "Man's 
Disorder and God's Design," the Am- 
sterdam Series of the World Council 
of Churches : 

The fundamental problem of the church 
is the existence of the churches. This is 
not an abstract, theological proposition ; 
it is our admission of a fact of life. 



Page Fourteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 3, 1949. 



(MasjsjaiaaM^'aaMSJaiaEJSiaMsiaisiaisiaiaja 

I The Orphanage j 

1 Chas. D. Johnston, Supt. 1 

Dear Friends: 

We have had lots of rain in this 
section since the first of December. 
We have been waiting- all this time to 
catch a few sunshiny days so the 
ground would get dry enough to break 
our corn and bean land. We always 
like to break our land in December so 
it will freeze out and get mellow dur- 
ing the Winter months. It works so 
much better in the spring and summer 
months. My father geve me that idea 
on farming when I was a small lad. 

The weather here this Winter so 
far has been very mild. We have been 
going about without overcoats and 
have been comfortable. The weather 
has been so mild that it has been hard 
to get two or three days to kill hogs. 

We have killed this season more 
than seven thousand pounds of pork. 
The children have had a good time 
eating good old sausage and pork 
chops. We cut the backbone into pork 
chops and they enjoy them very much. 

Our poultry farm is doing very 
nicely now. We have 175 hens in one 
lot that are now laying more than one 
hundred eggs per day. They would 
not lay an egg when eggs were eighty 
and ninety cents a dozen. But since 
eggs have declined in price, they are 
all trying to lay. In the fall they gave 
me fits buying high-priced feed and 
not laying at all. The children are 
enjoying an egg a day at least. I have 
heard it said that "an apple a day 
will keep the doctor away." We do 
not have the apples, but are using eggs 
instead and it is working fine. 

Chas. D. Johnston, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT FOR FEBRUARY 3, 1949. 

Amount brought forward $ 597.81 

Eastern N. C. Conference: 
Catawba Springs 10.25 

Eastern Va. Conference: 

Mt. Carmel S. S $ 12.79 

Union (South.) 19.50 

32.29 

Western N. C. Conference : 

Ether S. S $ 8.48 

Hank's Chapel S. S 27.00 

High Point, First 30.00 

65.48 

Va. Valley Conference : 
Newport S. S 15.61 

Ala. Conference : 

Corinth $ 3.83 

New Hope S. S 3.40 

Roanoke 3.00 

10.23 



Special Offerings. 

Amount brought forward $ 491.09 

Mrs. Gregory, child $35.00 

Mrs. Burgess, child 10.00 

Philathea Class, Reidsville 

Church for C. Williams 25.00 

Sale of material 273.94 

J. Spencer Love, Thanks- 
giving 250.00 

593.94 

County : 

Alamance 396.88 

Total this week from 

Special Offerings $ 990.82 

Total this year from 
Special Offerings $1,481.91 



Grand total for the week 



$1,124.68 



Grand total for the year . . . $2,213.58 



Total this week from churches $ 133.86 



Total this year from churches $ 731.67 



CHURCH WOMEN AT WORK. 
(Continued from page 9.) 

Cypress Chapel 2.00 

Dendron 1.45 

Eure 1.00 

Franklin 7.50 

Holland 4.00 

Holy Neck 5.00 

Liberty Spring 6.85 

Mt. Carmel 5.00 

Newport News 5.00 

Norfolk: 

Bay View 1.25 

Christian Temple 9.50 

Little Creek 2.00 

Rosemont 7.50 

Rosemont (Primary De- 
partment) 5.00 

Oakland 1.25 

Portsmouth, First 1.00 

Richmond, First 50 

South Norfolk 15.00 

Suffolk 10.00 

Windsor 8.77 

108.82 

Cradle Roll. 

Cypress Chapel $ .50 

Dendron 3.30 

Eure 1.00 

Franklin 2.00 

Liberty Spring 10.00 

Norfolk, Little Creek 1.00 

Oakland 5.00 

Richmond, First 50 

23.30 

Thank Offering. 

Antioch $ 20.33 

Begonia, Disputanta .... 19.00 

Bethlehem 35.00 

Bethlehem (Y. P.) 20.00 

Bethlehem (Jrs.) 7.00 

Burton's Grove (Y. P.) . 6.50 

Cypress Chapel 27.38 

Dendron 17.60 

Franklin 90.20 

Holland 42.45 

Holland (Y. P.) 5.00 

Holy Neck 68.00 

Holy Neck (Y. P.) 10.00 

Isle of Wight 18.00 

Johnson's Grove 15.00 

Liberty Spring 61.00 

Liberty Spring (Y. P.) . 15.00 

Liberty Spring (Jrs.) . . . 5.00 

Liberty Spring (Cradle 

Roll) 5.00 

Mt. Carmel 11.00 

Mt. Carmel (Y. P.) 11.00 



Mt. Zion 15.00 

New Lebanon 8.56 

Newport News 100.00 

Newport News (Y.' P.) . 11.15 

Norfolk: 

Bay View 17.50 

Little Creek 15.00 

Rosemont 32.45 

Second 24.00 

Oak Grove 9.00 

Oakland 60.00 

Portsmouth : 

First 40.00 

Shelton Memorial 25.00 

Richmond, First 11.60 

South Norfolk 25.00 

South Norfolk (Jrs.) . . . 5.50 

Spring Hill 18.00 

Suffolk 125.00 

Suffolk (Staley Society) . 62.50 

Sunbury, Damascus 36.30 

Union (South.) 13.00 

Union (South.) (Y. P.) . 6.00 

Wakefield 23.55 

Windsor 12.50 

Windsor (Y. P.) 12.50 

— 1,218.57 

Special Thank Offering (Shaowu). 

Norfolk, Christian Temple $ 61.38 

Cypress Chapel (Agnes 
Brittle Circle — for Sept. 
15) 25.00 

Isle of Wight 10.00 

Johnson's Grove 10.00 

Norfolk, First (S. S.) ... 30.00 

136.38 

Life Memberships. 

Cypress Chapel (Agnes 

Brittle Circle) $10.00 

Eure 10.00 

Liberty Spring 10.00 

Liberty Spring (Y. P.) . . 10.00 

Norfolk: 

Christian Temple 20.00 

Rosemont 10.00 

Waverly 10.00 

Memorials. 

Newport News $ 10.00 

Norfolk, Christian Temple 20.00 

Suffolk 30.00 

— 60.00 

Total $2,947.77 

Grand Total for Quarter . . . $3,253.27 
DISBURSEMENTS. 

West & Withers Renew 

Treasurer's Bond) .... $ 5.00 

Gu'rley Press (Programs 

for Woman's Meeting) . 11.00 

Virginia Council of Church 

Women 50.00 

Dr. Stanley U. North, 
Speaker, Woman's Meet- 
ing 20.00 

Gurley Press (Programs 
for Young People's Meet- 
ing) 10.00 

Dr. W. T. Scott (Help de- 
fray expense of speakers 
at Young People's Meet- 
ing) 25.00 

Mrs. W. V. Leathers, Trea- 
surer 2,947.77 

— 3,068.77 

Balance in Treasury, Jan. 7 $ 184.50 

Mrs. W. B. Williams, 
Treasurer. 

1253 24th Street, 
Newport News, Va. 



February 3, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Fifteen. 



ELISHA A. KING, D. D. 

In the death of Dr. Elisha A. King 
on December 14, our fellowship in the 
Southeast lost one who has been one 
of our most distinguished and de- 
voted ministers and leaders. He be- 
came the first minister of the Miami 
Beach Church which he served for 19 
years, retiring in 1940 as pastor emer- 
itus, but continuing to live in Miami. 

The Miami Beach Church was or- 
ganized in 1921 by the Extension 
Boards with the cooperation of the 
Building Society and Dr. King began 
his ministry in December of that year. 
This was a new city in the first flush 
of a great land and tourist boom. For 
the first years this church was the 
only church and was called the Com- 
munity Church. To create a real 
church in the midst of a community 
bent on pleasure and quick riches in- 
volved heavy responsibilities. Dr. 
King came from a successful minis- 
try in San Jose, Cal. He began his 
life service as a YMCA Secretary and 
had served churches in Ohio and 
Washington. For eighteen years he 
edited the Church Methods depart- 
ment of the - Expositor., with these 
backgrounds he was well equipped to 
apply unique methods and develop a 
program of wide community serv- 
ice. How he did this he has told in 
his book, Planting a Church m a Na- 
tional Playground. He early cleared 
the church of a large debt and greatly 
increased the budget to enable the 
church to undertake an enlarging ser- 
vice. 

An expert in the use of printer's 
ink and the public press he brought 
the church into city -wide attention. 
In 1926 he began the use of the radio, 
when radio religious service was not 
as common as now. He received let- 
ters of appreciation from wide areas 
in this country and of our island and 
foreign neighbors, and from light- 
houses and ships at sea. In 1927 he 
started the Easter Sunrise services 
at the Beach with an attendance of 
10,000 the first service. It has in- 
creased to several times that number. 
With the use of fine music, with pop- 
ular Sunday evening lectures and the 
use of moving and still pictures he 
drew large evening congregations. 
But with it all he was building a real 
church with liberal but vital spirit- 
ual preaching, and by publishing 
many pamphlets and booklets in his 
"Personal Help Library." His last 
book published since his retirement, 
was on the Book of Revelations. 

Dr. King was most civic minded. 
For years he served on the Welfare 



Boards and Civic Organizations. As 
the Miami Herald in an editorial says, 
after saying that the community had 
lost a "distinguished citizen," His 
life was a rare combination of relig- 
ious effort with civic interest. As 
pastor of the church he left his im- 
print on the religious practice of Mi- 
ami Beach. 

Dr. King was indefatigable in his 
service to the Florida Conference and 
the whole denomination. He served 
longer as chairman of the Conference 
Board of Directors than any other and 
he was most cooperative with the Su- 
perintendent. He loved the fellow- 
ship. He organized the Congrega- 
tional Ministers Club which for sev- 
eral years met regularly in his home. 

Of him it might truthfully be said 
"Pie passed from death unto life be- 
cause he loved the brethren. ' ' 

Edwin C. Gillette. 

Note: Dr. Gillette, Superinten- 
dent-Emeritus of the Florida Confer- 
ence, came to the state within a few 
months of Dr. King's arrival in Mi- 
ami Beach. Throughout the years 
they have remained close personal 
friends. This makes Dr. Gillette's 
estimate of more than usual interest. 



THE MID-WINTER MEETING 
(Continued from page 11.) 

of the churches and the boards among 
the women of the Congregational 
Christian Churches; their Woman's 
Gift, a sum given annually by the wo- 
men over and above regular appor- 
tionment gifts and last year amount- 
ing to $78,127, and elect a president 
for the next biennium. The Presi- 
dent's Dinner comes Sunday noon, 
February 6, at Schauffler College. 

The Central Committee of the Na- 
tional Council of the Pilgrim Fellow- 
ship (youth organization) will meet 
February 5 and 6 at the Cleveland 
Hotel. They will discuss youth plans 
and programs for the year and means 
for reaching of their goal of $500,000 
adopted as their share in the Congre- 
gational Christian World Mission. 
They will meet jointly on Sunday 
with the Youth Fellowship of the 
Evangelical and Reformed Church. 
Among those present will be : Ernest 
Rutter, Carleton College, Northfield, 
Minn. ; Miss Polly Anderson, Bridge- 
port, Conn. ; Robert Polk of Chicago, 
111. ; Miss Mary Lou Pettit of Grand 
Rapids, Mich. ; Rev. Oliver Powell of 
Chicago, 111., Congregational Chris- 
tian National Secretary for Young 
People. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON. 
(Continued from page 12.) 
cy. But many a modern man has 
overlooked one of the greatest oppor- 
tunities which the Sabbath brings — 
the opportunity to worship and to 
renew the life of the spirit within. 

Criticism Number Five. 
This criticism is closely akin to the 
one treated above. In this case there 
was a man in the synagogue with a 
paralyzed hand, as I recall it Luke 
with a physician's observing nature 
says it was his right hand, the man's 
means of making a livelihood. What 
would the Master do ? Would He dare 
heal a man on the Sabbath day and 
thus break the sacred law of the Sab- 
bath? Even the patience of the Mas- 
ter wore thin under such criticism and 
callousness. Looking around in right- 
eous indignation, grieved at the hard- 
ness of their hearts, He restored the 
withered hand whole as the other 
hand. That was too much. Such a 
fellow as this irresponsible teacher 
was not fit to live. Why He would 
upset the whole applecart. So these 
pious Pharisees went forth and took 
counsel with the Herodians — they did 
not have anything in common with 
each other but a dislike and a fear of 
Jesus — how they might destroy Him. 
Opposition to Jesus, like politics, 
makes some strange bed-fellows. 

MISSIONS. 
(Continued from page 8.) 
remain in Japan in his memory such 
as a school or a church or a society, 
but his first interest in life was to 
preach the gospel. 

For a time he was president of the 
Bible Training School in Tokyo. He 
was a teacher of English and Bible at 
Azabu Middle School and of New 
Testament Greek at Aoyama Gakuin 
for the last 12 years until his retire- 
ment. 

Dr. Woodworth was born on a 
farm in Irwin County, one of 16 chil- 
dren. When he was 18 he took the 
teacher's examination for a license 
and taught in a small school in Madi- 
son County for three months at $30.00 
a month. Out of the total of $90.00 he 
saved $60 to begin his courses at Ob- 
erlin College. He worked his way 
through college doing everything from 
sawing wood, waiting on table, build- 
ing a barn to teaching. 

Before going to Japan in 1892 Dr. 
Woodworth was for nine years Pro- 
fessor of Latin and Physiology at 
Union Christian College in Merom, 
Indiana. 



Page Sixteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 3, 1949. 



For religious insight, courage and power, "Wait upon the Lord' 
in periods of daily meditation and prayer 




Three Great Devotional Guides 

For the Lenten Season 

Literature of the Commission on Evangelism and Devotional Life 

The Fellowship of Prayer 

By GEORGE MILES GIBSON 

Now in its 31st year, this Lenten aid to devotions is used by hundreds of thou- 
sands annually. God's Gift is the current high theme for meditation and prayer. 
48 pages. $4.00 a 100 

Lenten Devotions for Young People 

By OLIVER POWELL 

Based on Jesus' parables, these meditations lead young people to wider trust in the 
power of God to make them more fit for the business of living as Christians. 48 pages. 

Single copy, 5 cents; $4.00 a 100 

Daily Devotions 

WINTER 1949 ISSUE 

This quarterly offers meditations and prayer to gird the religious structure of 
family life. Contributors are denominational leaders. While primarily designed for 
family use, this guide also lends itself admirably for individual use. 

The last section in the Winter 1949 Issue carries The Fellowship of Prayer medi- 
tations for Lent up to March 31. 96 pages. $5.00 a 100 



For Use in Lenten Church Services 

A Service for Thursday of Holy Week 

A complete program with communion service $3.00 a 100 

The Vigil of Maundy Thursday 

The Office of Tenebrae with holy communion $3.00 a 100 

A Service for Good Friday 

A devotional service for church and community $3.00 a 100 



For General Distribution to 
Church Members 

HIGHLIGHTS OF HOLY WEEK 

By Howard J. Chidley 

Daily readings based on happenings in the last 
week of our Lord's life. An interpretation which 
brings the meaning of Holy Week closer to the 
reader. 16 pages. $3.00 a 100 



Please order in multiples of five. The hundred rate applies on quantity orders 

THE PILGRIM PRESS 

14 Beacon Street, Boston 8, Massachusetts 19 S. La Salle Street, Chicago 3, Illinois 



1844 - Over a Century of Service^^^Denominatiori - 1949 

The CHRISTIAN SUN 

ORGAN OF THE SOUTHERN CONVENTION OF CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 
In Essentials, Unity — In Non-Essentials, Liberty — In All Things, Charity 

Volume CI. RICHMOND, VA., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1949. Number 6. 



Indiana Woman Becomes National 
President 




Mrs. Harlan E. Walley 

Mrs. Harlan E. Walley, of East Chicago, Indiana, was elected President of the 
National Fellowship of Congregational Christian Women and Chairman of the State 
Presidents at a meeting being held this week in Cleveland, Ohio, in conjunction with 
the Missions Council Midwinter Meeting. 

In this post Mrs. Walley becomes the chosen leader of some 700,000 Congregational 
Christian women across the United States for the next two years. Mrs. Walley, who 
resides at 4237 Northcote, East Chicago, Indiana, is the wife of Harlan E. Walley, 
principal of the Garfield School in East Chicago. 

"It is a chaotic world in which we live and human needs are great. If we are all 
alert to the call of our time, we find demands pressing in on us from every side. To 
meet these demands our greatest need is inner strength which comes with complete sur- 
render to the knowledge that God is eternal. Today church women, in common with all 
Christians, must accept and cherish the imperative to be and to act as one in Christ, 
that Christianity may become the great vital force which will lead the peoples of the 
world to a destiny glorified in peace and in brotherhood," said Mrs. Walley after her 
election. "As Christian women we must make of our homes a place of renewal and of 
strengthening for all those who go out therefrom; we must make of our churches places 
of real study and effective action; we must reach out into our communities and into 
our world to help establish the holy art of human relations." 



Page Two. 



News Flashes 



Rev. Johnson Griffin began his min- 
istry at Bay View, Norfolk, last Sun- 
day. 

Be sure to read carefully the Coun- 
cil Resolutions appearing on page five 
of this issue. 



Rev. Joseph E. McCauley of Wav- 
erly occupied his former pulpit in 
Richmond last Sunday. 



Rev. Carl R. Key supplied the pul- 
pit for Dr. Stanley C. Harrell at Dur- 
ham last Sunday. Dr. Harrell was in 
Cleveland where he is serving on the 
Executive Committee of the General 
Council. 



An error was made when Anti- 
merger, January, 1949, issue, printed 
the name of Rev. E. T. Cotten in the 
list of those on State Committees. Mr. 
Cotten writes : " I have always worked 
for the union of the followers of 
Christ." 



Dr. Harley H. Gill of 1164 Phelan 
Building, San Francisco, California, 
Superintendent of the Congregational 
Christian Churches of Northern Cali- 
fornia, was elected President of the 
Fellowship of Congregational Chris- 
tian State Superintendents meeting in 
Cleveland in conjunction with the 
Midwinter Meetings. 



Miss Dorothy Cushing writes : ' ' One 
of the best known figures in the field 
of religious journalism Miss Rachel 
K. McDowell, has just retired as relig- 
ious news editor of the New York 
Times, a post she has filled for more 
than 28 years. Miss McDowell began 
her newspaper career on the New Eve- 
ning News and served on the New 
York Herald before going to the 
Times. Religious leaders, and espe- 
cially church public relations repre- 
sentatives, of all faiths have found in 
Miss McDowell a sympathetic friend 
and an accurate, thorough and con- 
scientious journalist." 



Rev. and Mrs. Loy L. Long are re- 
turning to their post under the Amer- 
ican Board in Bombay, India. For 
the past three years, Mr. Long has been 
serving as candidate secretary for the 
American Board and has been instru- 
mental in recruiting 124 new workers 
for Christian overseas service. He 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 

began his India career in 1930 as a 
Christian social service worker in 
Ahmednagar, the political and social 
center of some 1,000,000 Marathi peo- 
ple. He was a spearhead in remedial 
work along juvenile delinquency lines, 
in cooperation with the local govern- 
ment, helped set up a Remand Home, 
a Children 's Court and other progres- 
sive social organizations. 



Dr. John Reuling, our American 
Board Secretary for Africa, is doing 
an African tour with Dr. David Mc- 
Keith, the new executive vice-presi- 
dent of the American Board. He will 
be writing Travel Letters from time 
to time and has agreed that these 
should go out from Boston to friends 
and through them to the church 
groups that may be especially inter- 
ested. Those who are personally in- 
terested in receiving copies of these 
" travel- tlalks " please write to Miss 
Sara Morse, c|o ABCFM, 14 Beacon 
Street, Boston 8, Mass., Dr. Reuling 's 
secretary, giving your address or the 
address of someone who will make use 
of the material in your behalf. 



LAYMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 
0EGANIZED. 

The Men's Fellowship League of 
the Congregational Christian Church 
of Hopewell, reorganized their meet- 
ing at the home of Mr. R. B. White. 
Officers were elected as follows : Frank 
Lowe, president; John Knight Eanes, 
spiritual leader; R. B. White, treasur- 
er; Frank Sodomka, secretary. 



HOLY NECK REPORTS. 

Holy Neck Congregational Chris- 
tian Church observed Christian Fam- 
ily Life Day in two services on Sun- 
day, January 16. In the morning 
worship service, Dr. Luther B. Grice, 
the pastor, preached on "The Chris- 
tian Family Today." Family groups 
sat together in the family pews in this 
service. There was a large attend- 
ance. 

On Sunday night the family groups 
of the church met at 6 :00 p. m. in the 
church hall for a fellowship supper. 
This was a very fine get-together of 
many families. Dr. John Norfleet, Jr., 
of Suffolk, who was reared in Holy 
Neck Church, showed moving pictures 
of Hawaii. Following this Mrs. B. D. 
Jones gave an inspiring address on the 
Christian home and the relationship 
of church and home. The entire con- 
gregation felt that this had been such 
an inspirational day that it is possible 
that it will be made an annual event. 



February 10, 1949. 

CITATIONS AWARDED BY THE 
GENERAL COUNCIL. 
MRS. E. T. WILLSON. 

Mrs. E. T. Willson of New York 
City, Executive Secretary of the Con- 
gregational Christian Committee for 
War Victims and Reconstruction from 
1940-48, has been awarded a citation 
from the Congregational Christian 
Churches of U. S. A. for her "un- 
wearied devotion to the cause of the 
victims of war." This citation was 
presented during the Missions Coun- 
cil in Cleveland. 

The citation read : "To Hawley 
Wilson, whose unwearied devotion to 
the cause of the Victims of War has 
led our Fellowship to bring food to 
the hungry, clothing to the naked, 
shelter to the homeless, healing to the 
sick, comfort to the disconsolate, hope 
to the discouraged, and strength to the 
weak. Her unfailing vitality and large 
usefulness as Executive Secretary 
of the Congregational Christian Com- 
mittee for War Victims and Recon- 
struction, 1940-48, has won for her 
our gratitude and the undying remem- 
brance of those unnumbered ones to 
whom she has ministered." 

o 

DR. SAMUEL C. KINCHELOE. 

Dr. Samuel C. Kincheloe, educator, 
sociologist and Christian minister, 
was awarded a Citation for Distin- 
guished Service at the annual lunch- 
eon of the Congregational Christian 
Division of Church Extension and 
Evangelism in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. 
Kincheloe is Professor of Sociology of 
Religion in Chicago Theological Sem- 
inary. 

Described as "minister, educator, 
sociologist, teacher and exemplar of 
the Christian religion," Dr. Kinche- 
loe was cited for his distinguished ser- 
vice in developing the "technique of 
application of the scientific method to 
religious institutions" and for his re- 
search which has made "invaluable 
contribution to the life of the churches 
of Chicago and to the Congregational 
Christian Churches of the nation." 
The Citation was presented by Dr. A. 
J. Buttrey of Montclair, New Jersey, 
Chairman of the Division of Church 
Extension and Evangelism. 

The Citation also said, "We are in- 
debted to you for a rare quality of 
mind and generosity of spirit, a keen 
sight into processes by which institu- 
tions live and die, a constant stream of 
carefully trained students who have 
carried your method, your spirit and 
your technique into many places of 
power and influence. ' ' 

(Continued on page 11.) 



February 10, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Three, 



GOOD NEWS ABOUT HUMAN 
EIGHTS. 

By Rev. Wm. C. Kernan. * 

It took the Social Committee of the 
United Nations' General Assembly 
two and a half years to adopt its uni- 
versal Declaration of Human Rights. 

From information available at this 
time it looks like a job well done. It 
has the advantage of resting on sound 
principles which recognize and pro- 
tect the God-given rights of individ- 
ual persons against the presumptuous 
and intolerable tyranny of the totali- 
tarianism of both Hitler and Stalin. 

Closely following our own Virginia 
Bill of Rights and our Declaration of 
Independence, the new Document in- 
sists that men are born free and equal 
and that they are endowed with in- 
alienable rights which must be rec- 
ognized in terms of freedom of wor- 
ship, speech, assembly, self-govern- 
ment, and the right to own property — 
irrespective of race, religion, national 
oi-igin, or class. 

Striking at the oppressive methods 
of the police state to restrict the lib- 
erty of individual persons, the decla- 
ration recognizes every person's right 
to move from one place to another 
within his own country and to leave 
it altogether if he wants to. 

Aimed at concentration camps and 
slave labor, which prevail under the 
totalitarian police state, the declara- 
tion affirms that men have freedom 
of choice regarding the work they do. 

The New York Times (December 8)* 
pointedly observes, ' ' Taken as a whole 
the declaration contradicts and out- 
laws the very concept not only of the 
totalitarian state but also of the 'dic- 
tatorship of the proletariat' and the 
'class struggle,' which are the fun- 
damental principles of Communism 
and the Communist state. ' ' 

It is not surprising, therefore, to 
learn that Communist representatives 
on the committee, which after so much 
labor completed the Declaration of 
Human Rights, opposed its provisions. 
For Communists do not believe in the 
rights of individual persons. In this 
country they make a pretense of be- 
lieving in them in order to attract a 
following. In countries where they 
have power their works belie this pre- 
tense. 

The new Declaration of Human 
Rights, which follows so closely on 
our own traditional principles, is the 
free world's answer to the slave world. 
All true and loyal Christians will up- 
hold it and desire that every Ameri- 
can — regardless of race, creed or class 
— enjoy that freedom which is now 



recognized as belonging to all men the 
whole world over. 



A PEEACHER "SUITED." 

The pastor of Long 's Chapel 
church, Route 5, Burlington, N. C, 
was made happy Monday morning, 
January 17, when one of the members 
asked him to call by the garage where 
he worked, and to the great surprise 
of the pastor, the member said, "You 
go to a certain clothing store and se- 
lect a suit, the money was given yes- 
terday by your friends for that pur- 
pose." No one knows how happy 
such a surprise makes a minister, un- 
til one has the experience. 

There's hoping that services ren- 
dered in the future may be such that 
no one will ever regret the gift that 
made it possible for the pastor to have 
the nicest suit he ever wore. Such 
consideration should certainly make 
a servant more humble. Thanks ! 

Guy II. Veazey. 



ATTEND COMMUNION. 

Every member of the church at- 
tend the service of the Lord's Supper. 
It is one of those delicate invitations, 
made by the Lord Jesus Himself, 
which under the circumstances we 
should give great concern to attend. 
According to our faith He has given 
His life for us, has made the forgive- 
ness of all our sins possible, and has 
assured us of His constant love and 
mercy. He has asked us to do this one 
thing in memory of Him, namely, par- 
take of the Lord 's Supper. 

Suppose a beloved neighbor or 
friend had prepared to receive us at 
supper, had graciously given us the 
invitation, we would consider it meet 
and right for us to be present. The 
Lord has graciously invited us to His 
Supper. Let us attend. 

John G. Truitt. 



The Christian Sun 

Established 1844 by Rev. Daniel W. Kerr. 

A Eeligious Weekly for the Home, devoted 
to the interests of the Kingdom as represent- 
ed by the Congregational Christian Churches. 
Our Principles. 

1. The Lord Jesus Christ is the only 
Head of the Church. 

2. Christian is a sufficient name for the 
Church. 

3. The Bible is a sufficient rule of faith 
and practice. 

4. Christian character is a sufficient test 
of fellowship and Church membership. 

5. The right of private judgment and the 
liberty of conscience is a right and a privi- 
lege that should be accorded to and exer- 
cised by all. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor Robert Lee House 

Managing Editor John T. Kernodle 

Associate Editors — J. B. Allen, H. G. Coun- 
cill Jr., J. H. Dollar, F. B. Eutsler, S. C. 
Han-ell, R. M. Kimball, B. V. Munger, 
J. E. Neese, W. W. Sloan, H. S. Smith. 
Corresponding Editors — J. F. Apple (E. N. 
C), W. M. Stevens (N. C. & Va.), F. C. 
Lester (W. N. C), J. G. Truitt (E. Va.), 
R. A. Whitten (V. Va.). 
Departmental Editors — Wm. T. Scott, Con- 
vention; Mrs. W. J. Andes, Women's 
Work; Miss Elizabeth Chicoine, Young 
People's Work; Mrs. R. L. House, Chil- 
dren; L. E. Smith, Christian Education; 
Clias. D. Johnston, Orphanage; H. S. 
Hardcastle, Sunday School. 
Board of Publications— W. J. Andes, S. E. 
Madren, W. M. Stevens, W. E. Wisseman, 
T. F. Wright. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Six Months $1.00 

One Year $2.00 

Published by the Board of Publications, 
agent for the Southern Convention of Con- 
gregational Christian Churches, and printed 
every Thursday except the last in June and 
December by the Central Publishing Co., 
Inc., Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Post 
Office at Richmond, Va., July 25, 1922, un- 
der Act of March 3, 1879. 

Remittances for subscriptions should be sent 
to the Convention Office, Elon College, 

N. C. 

All other matters of business should be ad- 
dressed to The Christian Sun, 1536 East 
Broad Street, Richmond, 19, Va. 

Contributions should reach the editor at 
.'i20G Grove Avenue, Richmond, 21, Va 



The Christian Sun Subscription Blank 

FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 
FIFTY ISSUES FOR $2.00 

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Elon College, N. C. 

Enclosed find $ for which please send The Christian 

Sun for one year to 

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Page Four. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 10, 1949. 




THE EDITOR'S JvJXSSAGE 




MERGER APPROVED AT CLEVELAND. 

February 5, 1949, will be remembered as one of 
the landmarks in the pilgrimmage of ecumenicity. A 
solemn hush fell upon the 929 accredited delegates at the 
General Council in Cleveland when Moderator Helen 
Kenyon declared that we had voted our readiness to 
proceed with union. The decisive vote was 752 for and 
172 against. The Cleveland action leaves the General 
Council and its property rights intact for the time being, 
since final approval is contingent on acceptance by the 
Evangelical and Reformed Church of the Interpretations 
of the Basis of Union which were adopted at the Oberlin 
Council and published in this paper. 

The substantial approval grew out of the conviction 
that church union is an issue too momentous for pro- 
crastination, that a sufficient mandate to proceed had 
been received from churches and people. The many 
testimonies for union might be summarized as follows: 
(1) World Conditions — Dr. Hilda Ives stressed the fact 
that the inescapable, world-wide problem is how to get 
along together with great differences. This union can 
demonstrate in a new way in a new day the ability to 
form a new fellowship in Christ. We shall be the first 
to do so in an agonizing world. (2) The Plight of 
Protestantism — Dr. Aruthur Cushman McGiffert, presi- 
dent of Chicago Seminary, hailed the merger as a good 
chance to succeed and work out a new pattern for 
Protestantism. Another declared that many outside our 
church, and many outside all churches are looking to us 
for leadership now. (3) The Faith, Idealism and En- 
thusiasm of Youth. 

Yes, there was opposition, as the score indicates. 
There are nests of opposition scattered across the coun- 
try. Some feared a loss of freedom, that the anatomy 
of the local church would be curtailed. Some felt that a 
72 per cent affirmative vote was insufficient. Others 
were dissatisfied with the Basis of Union and charged 
that it was ambiguous. 

All this, it would appear, is a part of the growing 
pains which we must experience. In view of this situ- 
ation, the following Recommendation from the Com- 
mission on Interchurch Relations and Christian Unity 
was passed: 

"This Council solicits the widest support and 
adherence of all Congregational Christian Churches 
to the proposed United Church of Christ. And, ac- 
knowledging the varieties of religious experience 
and conviction within our membership, we further 
recognize the possibility of various types of relation- 
ship to the United Church of Christ, so that each 
local church, whether having approved the Basis 
of Union or not, may be free to maintain, or estab- 
lish such relationships to its Association, Conference, 
and to the General Synod, as may be mutually 
agreeable." 




The great majority of people in our Southern Con- 
vention will approve if not applaud the action of the 
Cleveland Council. It is in line with our historic faith 
and practice. Sufficient time has elapsed since our Con- 
gregational Christian union to prepare and be in readi- 
ness for another. Whatever lessons we have learned in 
the ecclesiastical laboratory of church union should not 
be forgotten. They should be remembered, utilized and 
implemented in furthering the union of Christian be- 
lievers. Wider barriers should be transcended and more 
difficult problems surmounted. In the words of Dean 
Weigle of Yale: "If Congregational Christians cannot 
unite, who can?" 

But union is not yet complete. The long and ar- 
duous task of implementing the union lies ahead. Wis- 
dom and grace in large measure will be needed. We 
must use all acquired skills and develop new ones if this 
union is to result in fruition rather than frustration. 
Having put our hands to the plow, we dare not look 
backward. As the Christian Century points out, the 
road to union is a rocky one, but it is one we dare not 
bypass. 

The yoke of Christ is one of union. Freedom is 
achieved only in union. The clarion call of the hour 
is for every apostle of union to come down from the 
balcony of life and take upon himself the yoke and 
harness of Christ. 



RACE RELATIONS. 

The editor proposes a text for Race Relations Sun- 
day: "Study to show thyself approved unto God, a 
workman that need not be ashamed, righly dividing the 
word of truth." Christian people must study this tough 
and inescapable problem of race relations in order to 
show themselves approved — not to the minister, nor to 
the editor, but unto God. 

Pronouncements from the Federal Council of 
Churches and elsewhere should be read, not with the 
intentions of rebuttal, but with the purpose of amplify- 
ing one's understanding of the problem. We are not 
under the necessity of aggreeing with any and every 
pronouncement on civil rights, but we as Christian 
Citizens are under obligation to acquaint ourselves with 
the findings of important bodies on this live issue. It 
may be helpful to remember that "The difference be- 
tween a prejudice and a conviction is that you can ex- 
plain a conviction without getting mad." 

The Statement on Human Rights adopted at the 
Biennial Meeting of the Federal Council of Churches 
at Cincinnati, December 3, 1948, is worthy of Christian 
consideration. Read slowly and thoughtfully the follow- 
ing paragraphs from the Statement: 

"All men are God's creatures and have infinite 
worth in His sight; they are also included in the 
saving work of Christ. All men, and Christians in 



February 10, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Five. 



particular, are therefore responsible 
to God to love and serve Him ; to live 
in such a way that the lives they live 
and the work they do shall be worthy 
of their capacities and gifts; and to 
regard other people as their neighbors 
whom they should love as themselves. 
They are also responsible at all times 
to obey God as the supreme Lord of 
conscience. 

"But men have not only responsi- 
bilities toward God and their fellow 
men which they must discharge ; they 
have God-given rights which society 
must respect and for whose realization 
it must make provision. 

"The flagrant violation of human 
rights in our generation has outraged 
every Christian feeling and has im- 
peded the achievement of world order. 
Even in those lands which profess ad- 
herence to the Christian democratic 
tradition there are discriminatory re- 
strictions and exploitations. The dig- 
nity of man and the obligation of 
Christian brotherhood are so clearly 
expressed in the Gospels that our own 
failure to live up to their precepts is 
a reproach against us among non- 
Christian peoples. The churches can- 
not view this situation with uncon- 
cern. 

"All of the rich gifts which God 
imparts to men should be available to 
all without distinction as to race, 
color, sex, birth, nationality, class, or 
creed. Although man's life consists 
in fellowship with God and not in the 
abundance of things; although the 
Christian in privation and tribulation 
may be more than conqueror ; yet the 
denial of freedom, justice, and securi- 
ty to others is the violation of basic 
rights. Opposition to such indignities 
is a Christians duty and it must be 
carried out by Christian means if it 
is not to defeat its purpose. 

' ' Every right with which man is en- 
dowed by his Creator contains a cor- 
responding responsibility to use this 
freedom wisely and generously, for 
righteous ends and with due regard 
for the similarly God-given rights of 
others. Moral obligation is at the cen 1 
ter of the Christian concept of human 
rights. 

"Social safeguards are necessary 
for the peaceful adjustment of con- 
flicting rights and to prevent their 
violation or curb their misuse whether 
by individuals or the state. If these 
safeguards are not themselves to be- 
come a peril to liberty, free society 
must accept some risks that freedom 
may not be abused by those who would 
destroy it. The churches, the state, 
and individual citizens have responsi- 
bility for observance of these require- 



ments of human rights. It is pre- 
sumptuous for the state to assume 
that it can grant or deny fundamental 
rights. It is for the state to embody 
these rights in its own legal system 
and to ensure their observance in 
practice. It is for the churches to en- 
courage the state fully to recognize 
these rights in law, but also, since the 
churches are under special obligation 
to obey God rather than man, they 
must go beyond the requirements of 
law and seek vigorously to realize 



Whereas, in June, 1942, the Gen- 
eral Council of the Congregational 
Christian Churches, in its regularly 
convened session at Durham, New 
Hampshire, initially recognized the- 
possibility of union with the Evan- 
gelical and Reformed Church, and au- 
thorized its appropriate Committee 
"to explore the possibilities of organ- 
ic union ' ' ; 

Whereas, in June, 1944, the Gen- 
eral Council, in its regularly convened 
session at Grand Rapids, Michigan, 
declared that mutual acquaintance 
and fellowship was a prerequisite to 
any vote iipon the subject of union, 
and asked "all churches, associations, 
conferences and national agencies to 
seek opportunity for fellowship with 
the corresponding group of the Evan- 
gelical and Reformed Church"; 

Whereas, a Joint Committee, com- 
prising representatives of the Congre- 
gational Christian Churches and of 
the Evangelical and Reformed Church 
prepared a first draft of a "Basis of 
Union" in March, 1943; and subse- 
quently, in collaboration with and un- 
der the direction of the Commission 
on Interchurch Relations and Chris- 
tian Unity effected various revisions 
thereof as a result of cooperative 
study and deliberation, the final draft 
bearing the date of January 22, 1947, 
being now and known and designated 
as "The Basis of Union"; 

Whereas, in June, 1946, the Gen- 
eral Council, in its regularly convened 
session at Grinnell, Iowa, directed that 
a further and more explicit definition 
be sought for the merged activities 
of the Missionary, Social Action and 
Pension functions of the two Com- 
munions, pursuant to which such ad- 
ditional types of agreement were ne- 
gotiated by the Boards and Commis- 
sions involved, and were incorporated 
in the ' ' Basis of Union ' ' • 

Whereas, the final draft of the 
"Basis of Union" was submitted to 



these principles wherever they apply 
within their own fellowship ; to sup- 
port and encourage their members in 
conscientious endeavor to achieve 
these ends in the community and na- 
tion ; and to seek solutions in the spirit 
of Christian reconciliation. The 
churches are likewise bound to offer 
a continual challenge to the consci- 
ence of the community and to seek to 
influence the government in its ap- 
propriate sphere to safeguard the 
rights of all. " 



all voting delegates of the 1946 Coun- 
cil in the several states, according as 
State Superintendents found it pos- 
sible, with the request that they vote 
upon the question, "Is the Basis of 
Union now ready for submission to all 
Conferences, Associations, Churches 
and Members ? ' ' and the resulting vote 
was: 

Favorable— 497 Opposed — 99 

Whereas, the "Basis of Union" 
was then submitted to all of the Con- 
gregational Christian Conferences, 
Associations, Churches and Members 
for their approval or disapproval, 
with the following result, as reported 
in June, 1948 : 

RESOLUTION No. 1 — ON APPROVAL 
OF THE UNION. 

Churches : 

For 2,576 (65.5%) 

Against l ; 352 

Members : 

For 144,221 (63.3%) 

Against 83,503 

Conferences : 

For 32 (94.1%) 

Against 2 

Associations : 

For 152 (80.0%) 

Against 38 

RESOLUTION No. 2— ON REMAINING 
IN THE FELLOWSHIP IN EVENT 
OF UNION. 



Churches : 

For 2,818 (78.3%) 

Against 781 

Members : 

For 147,680 (76.2%) 

Against 46,108 

Conferences : 

For 31 (91.2%) 

Against 3 

Associations : 

For 163 (94.2%) 

Against 10 



Whereas, in June, 1948, the Gen- 
eral Council, in its regularly convened 
session at Oberlin, Ohio, adopted cer- 
tain Interpretations of the "Basis of 
Union" intended to clarify its mean- 
ing and significance for the Congre- 
( Continued on page 13.) 



Recommendations Voted By the 
Cleveland Council 



Page Six. THE CHRISTIAN SUN 

CONTRIBUTIONS 



SUFFOLK LETTER. 

Twenty-three young people, and 
their counsellor, Miss Louise Lilly of 
the high scool faculty, had a buffet 
supper in the parsonage this Sunday 
night, as a part of their Youth Week 
celebrations. These are charming girls 
and boys. The church, and the coun- 
try can be proud of them. They are 
healthy, happy, sincere church youth. 
They look forward to living a life of 
service as Christians in whatever avo- 
cation they settle upon. They are 
bright and easy to talk with, not shy, 
not boistrous, but full of whatever is 
on the program. To know them is to 
love them. To help them is to have a 
place in their usefulness throughout 
all the years of their lives. They can 
come again and again, for they are 
welcome. 

At the 7 :30 service they simulated 
on the spot reports from sections of 
our mission work about the world 
through an improvised newscast. John 
Truitt, Jr., presided at the microphone 
arranged on a table on the platform 
and gave first a brief resume of the 
work being done on the sixteen foreign 
mission stations, giving a few of the 
statistics, and highlighting the mis- 
sionaries with whom our congregation 
was acquainted. Then telling his lis- 
teners that as it had been said a pic- 
ture was worth a thousand words, he 
felt that an on-the-spot report was 
worth many printed pages, he was 
going to let them hear directly from 
some of our important fields in our 
mission work. 

"The next voice you hear," so he 
said, "will be that of the Rev. Rich- 
ard L. Jackson, speaking to us from 
Shaowu, China." From an unseen 
quarter a voice, gathering up some of 
the most interesting recent reports 
from Dick Jackson, was heard. Fol- 
lowed a brief comment from the an- 
nouncer, and ... "I am now going 
to bring you the Rev. Mr. Tanimoto, 
a. Japanese citizen, and minister of 
a Methodist Church in Hiroshima, a 
man who spent four years as a theo- 
logical student in America, who sur- 
vived the atomic bombing of his city, 
who will tell us of what is happening 
there on the land and in the hearts of 
the citizens of Hiroshima. ' ' Also was 
brought in like manner reports from 
the work being done by Miss Ruth 
Seabury as reported by one of the 
girls who attended one of her confer- 



ences. The Rev. Armstrong Hunter 
spoke from India. Mr. Fred Brown- 
lee, of New York, reported on Puerto 
Rico, and much to the delight of the 
listeners, especially since we had 
heard the good news of the Rev. D. 
P. Barrett's proposed return there for 
a short visit and the Golden Anniver- 
sary of our work on the islands. The 
announcer brought his listeners the 
Rev. Harold W. Case, of Elbowoods, 
N. D., where the youth of our church 
are sending a package. As a closing 
feature the author of I Heard a Child 
Crying from Hunger was introduced 
over the radio, and a plea Avas made 
by the young people for funds for Re- 
construction and Rehabilitation. And 
while all of this was but a simulation 
of a broadcasting newsroom it made 
a most worthwhile program, and the 
young people including the chorus of 
high school girls were the recipients 
of many compliments from the congre- 
gation. John G. Truitt. 



THE LANGDALE CHURCH GOES 
FORWARD. 

Two years ago last October the 
Langdale Church, Langdale, Ala., ac- 
cepted, with regret, the resignation of 
Rev. J. D. Dollar. During his nine 
years of ministry here the people 
learned to love and respect him as a 
real Christian servant. During his 
ministry with the church much prog- 
ress was made. He built a spiritual 
foundation for the church that has 
proven to be firm and strong. We 
are sure that the church will not fail 
upon such a foundation. At his leav- 
ing the church was forced to look for 
another minister. We were able to 
secure a nephew of Brother Dollar, 
Rev. Melvin Dollar, who is a graduate 
of Elon College and Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity. He has served our churches 
in North Carolina, Georgia and Ten- 
nessee. Since he came to us the 
church has continued to make prog- 
ress. In the past two years we have 
received 210 members into the church, 
making a total of 412 members at the 
present time. As the church has in- 
creased in membership it has in- 
creased in every other way. The 
Young People's Department has 
tripled in both membership and at- 
tendance. The Sunday school has 
doubled and the church attendance 
for the morning church service is be- 
yond seating capacity. Extra chairs 



February 10, 1949. 

are used every Sunday to accommo- 
date the congregation. The Sunday 
evening congregation runs around 
200. The youth choirs, of which there 
are three, present the music for this 
service. 

The church is sponsoring an active 
recreation program for the young peo- 
ple. They meet in three different 
groups during the week. At these 
meetings they play games, sing songs, 
go on picnics, and numerous other 
things. This is headed by an adult 
recreation committee. This has proven 
a great help to the church. 

A Men's Christian Service Club 
has been organized, and they are do- 
ing a great job. This group has 40 
active members. Their function is to 
serve the community and church. At 
Christmas time they gave 106 fruit 
baskets to old people of the communi- 
ty. They also gave $155.00 in cash to 
needy families. Another purpose for 
the club is to promote fellowship 
among the men of the church. 

During the past two years the 
church has added a $15,000.00 relig- 
ious education department, and has 
spent $2,500.00 on the parsonage, 
either for furniture, or improvements 
on the building. All this is done and 
paid for. The church has voted to 
buy an organ as its 1949 project. This 
is to be installed and paid for by Oc- 
tober the first. The church is out of 
debt, and the spirit of the membership 
is at its best. 

Nora Lee Hollis. 



INGRAM SUNDAY SCHOOL 
INSTALLS OFFICERS. 

An installation service of the Sun- 
day school officers and teachers was 
held at Ingram Congregational Chris- 
tian Church, Ingram, Va., on January 
9, 1949. Rev. R. T. Woodruff, pastor, 
was in charge of theceremony. 

Mr. J. K. Landrum, Sunday school 
superintendent for twenty-six years 
was installed with Mr. Benny Whit- 
low as his assistant. Mr. G. I. Satter- 
field and Mrs. Herbert Dunn were in- 
stalled as secretary and treasurer, re- 
spectively. 

The teachers who were installed are 
as follows: Mrs. Paul Farthing, Mrs. 
Clarence Landrum, Mrs. H. B. Satter- 
field, Mrs. G. I. Satterfield, Mrs. L. E. 
Carlton, Mr. W. W. Hankins, Jr., and 
Mrs. Fletcher Whitlow. 

Their assistants are as follows : Miss 
Mattie Henderson, Mrs. W. W. Han- 
kins, Jr., Mrs. J. K. Landrum, Miss 
Elsie Satterfield, Mrs. Joe Dunn, Mr. 
Herbert Dunn, and Mrs. LeRoy Ad- 
ams. Leslie Satterfield. 



February 10, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN 



Page Seven. 



News of Elon College 



By President L. E. Smith 



THE CHRISTIAN WORKERS 
CONFERENCE. 

Who can hope to measure accurate- 
ly the influence of an outstanding 
meeting of church leaders such as we 
had at the Elon College campus Jan- 
uary 23-27 ? Suffice it to say that the 
Christian Workers Conference was 
not just another meeting. It was a 
major event in the life of the college 
and the Convention. Students, fac- 
ulty members, ministers and laymen 
are still discussing some of the issues 
that were raised and giving evidence 
of being deeply impressed. Without 
any doubt many of the impressions 
that were made, ideas that were form- 
ulated, and inspirations that were 
shared will continue to produce fruit. 
Those who did not find it possible to 
attend were severely deprived. 

The outstanding thing about the 
conference can be summed up in two 
words, personality and experience. 
Those who spoke and conducted the 
discussions were all men of exception- 
al personal power. Zeal for God and 
His Kingdom was mingled with every 
word. No one who attended the ses- 
sions could have any doubt as to what 
dynamic Christian personality is. Fur- 
ther, the leaders were men of long 
and varied experience in the work of 
the church. Their counsels and dis- 
cussions were, therefore, down to 
earth yet they reached toward the 
throne of heaven with all the urgency 
of Christian idealism. It is a rare 
occasion indeed when such a group 
of effective leaders can be gathered 
for a program of study. 

Dr. Allen S. Meek, President of the 
Theological Seminary (of the Evan- 
gelical and Reformed Church), Lan- 
caster, Pennsylvania, was a successful 
pastor for thirty-six years. His work 
on committees and commissions for the 
Evangelical and Reformed Churches 
has been widely recognized. The six 
addresses that he delivered upon the 
subject of Evangelism and the con- 
ference periods over which he pre- 
sided were characterized by expert 
knowledge, a wealth of experience, 
and contagious enthusiasm. Careful- 
ly and clearly he unfolded a usuable 
program for reaching those who are 
not committed to the Christian cause. 
To quote the words that he used with 
reference to other addresses of the 



conference, what he brought to those 
in attendance was "a spiritual tonic." 

With the vigor, imagination and 
enthusiasm of a young man what Dr. 
Rockwell Harmon Potter said was 
backed up by more than half a cen- 
tury of experience as minister of the 
historic First Church in Hartford, 
Connecticut, and as Dean of Hartford 
Seminary Foundation. At the chapel 
service each morning at 10 :00, he 
asked a question : What is Religion ? 
What is Christianity ? What is Chris- 
tian Hope? What is Christian Love ? 
and What is the Christian Church? 
These discussions were clear, forceful, 
and convincing. The students were 
delighted. Visitors from near - by 
towns crowded the chapel to its ca- 
pacity. 

In a similar fashion, Dr. Howell 
Davies, of Chicago, Illinois, brought 
with his subject of Stewardship a life- 
time of experience and thought. With 
rare imagination, ready wit, and a 
penetrating knowledge of human af- 
fairs., he dressed the church budget up 
in a tweed suit and gave it a living 
and vital place in the life of the com- 
munity. It was pointed out that stew- 
ardship is essential in our way of life 
as citizens of a freedom-loving coun- 
try. 

Problems of church building and 
remodeling are crucial for almost ev- 
ery church in the Convention. To 
these problems Dr. Elbert M. Cono- 
ver, Director of the International Bu- 
reau of Architecture, brought his 
years of experience as a missions sec- 
retary of the Methodist Church and 
his expert professional skill. In addi- 
tion to his illustrated lectures upon 
the arts and techniques of church 
building-, Dr. Conover conducted a 
work-shop in the music room of the 
college and visited some of the near- 
by churches whose membership sought 
his advice. The services that he ren- 
dered to our area will continue as his 
suggestions become translated into 
terms of the brick and mortar of our 
religious institutions. 

Members of the conference also had 
the opportunity to hear the address 
of Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, Min- 
ister of Marble Collegiate Church, 
New York City, sponsored by the Bur- 
lington Chamber of Commerce. 

Among those who profited greatly 



from the conference not least are the 
34 ministerial students and religion 
majors at the college. Arrangements 
were made so that they could be ab- 
sent from their regular classes to at- 
tend the sessions of the conference 
and to confer with the leaders. The 
conference, therefore, became a sig- 
nificant part of their training for 
their chosen work as religious leaders. 

Ferris E. Reynolds. 



APPORTIONMENT GIVING. 

The college period, January and 
February, will soon be over. It is ex- 
pected that our pastors, Sunday school 
and church officials have informed 
their Sunday schools and congrega- 
tions of the advantages and needs of 
the college. Church people give from a 
sense of duty but they are enabled to 
allocate their gifts when they are 
properly informed. It has been said 
again and again that the college does 
not have an emotional appeal. This 
is true if you speak merely from sen- 
timent but if the giver is properly in- 
formed as to the benefits of education 
and gives out of sound judgment, his 
contribution for the "support of Chris- 
tian education will be generous. With- 
out trained leadership we would not 
get very far and without Christian 
training for our leadership, our lead- 
ership may go into the wrong direc- 
tion. Elon College stands for the 
church for the development of Chris- 
tian character and a Christian contri- 
bution to society. It appreciates your 
continued support. 

Churches. 

Previously reported $ 513.30 

Eastern Va. Conference: 

Bethlehem (Nans.) S. S 14.32 

Isle of Wight 4.00 

Liberty Spring S. S 20.00 

Mt. Oarmel S. S 14.60 

Newport News S. 8 23.50 

Portsmouth, First 6.93 

N. C. & Va. Conference : 

Bethel S. S 5.00 

Greensboro, First 43.32 

Happy Home 9.79 

Union (Va.) 8. S 10.00 

Western N. C. Conference: 

Albemarle 20.00 

Shady Grove 1.00 

Total $ 172.46 

Grand Total $ 685.76 



As a matter of simple economics, 
the liquor traffic is a burden upon ev- 
ery other industry, every profession 
and every trade. Its end effect is to 
curtail income, decrease output, de- 
preciate credit, and destroy the finan- 
cial independence of both drinkers 
and abstainers. 



Page Eight. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 10, 1949. 




NURSE COMMISSIONED FOR 
TURKEY. 

Miss Barbara Phyllis Bird, R. N., 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Mi- 
chael Bird of 317 West Street, Leo- 
minster, Mass., recently a nurse in the 
neuro-surgical ward of the Boston 
City Hospital has been appointed as 
a career nurse by the American Board 
and assigned to service in Talas, Tur- 
key. 

At Miss Bird's Commissioning Ser- 
vice Sunday morning, January 16 in 
the Pilgrim Congregational Church of 
Leominster, the Welcome to the Field 
was given by Luther R. Fowle of Is- 
tanbul, Turkey. The American Board 
Commission was conferred by Mark 
H. Ward, M. D., Medical Secretary 
of the American Board and former 
missionary in Turkey, while the ser- 
mon was preached by Dr. Fred Field 
Goodsell, Executive Vice-President of 
the American Board and former mis- 
sionary in Turkey. Rev. John R. 
Chapman, minister of the Pilgrim 
Church, gave the Prayer of Dedica- 
tion. Pilgrim Church is adopting 
Miss Bird as its missionary in the 
Near East. 

Miss Bird will be associated in Tur- 
key with Dr. William L. Nute who 
conducts a clinic in Talas, Turkey, a 
center of healing to which come peo- 
ple from hundreds of villages in that 
rural area. 



INDUSTRIAL MISSIONARY TO 
AFRICA. 

William S. Barker, Jr., son of Mr. 
and Mrs. William S. Barker of 39 
Fairview Drive, Wethersfield, Conn., 
has been appointed as a career indus- 
trial missionary in Africa by the 
American Board. 

An ex-service man who served in 
the U. S. Navy during World War II 
as Assistant Engineer on a destroyer 
with the Seventh Fleet in the China 
Seas, Mr. Barker worked with the 
General Electric in Pittsfield, Mass., 
as a test engineer following release 
from the Navy. 

' ' I believe that teaching is the best 
way I can devote my life to the serv- 



ice of Christ and that as a teacher of 
industrial arts I can help the Afri- 
can people. Jesus was a carpenter 
and through the centuries Christians 
have been workers. In learning to 
take pride in a job well done men al- 
so learn to build a. good life and to find 
satisfaction in it," says Mr. Barker. 

A second strong pull toward Africa 
is the fact that when he reaches there 
he will marry Miss Marie Bushong, 
R. N., daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Eu- 
gene Bushong, Long Meadow, Mass., 
a young American Board nurse who is 
right now finishing a course in mid- 
wifery at the McCord Zulu Hospital, 
Durban, South Africa. Mr. Barker 
and Miss Bushong will be married in 
the mission and be assigned to work 
at Mt. Silinda, Southern Rhodesia, 
Africa. 



LONG MISSIONARY CAREER ENDS. 

When in 1890 young Jessie Rebecca 
Hoppin, then in her early twenties, 
set sail for the exotic South Seas she 
began a 43-year career that has made 
her a beloved and almost legendary 
figure among the people of Micronesia. 

Her death at the age of 85 on Jan- 
uary 14 in Ashland, Wisconsin, has 
just been reported to the American 
Board, under which she served. It 
removes a dauntless spirit to whom 
William K. Vanderbilt paid tribute 
in his book narrating his adventures 
on board the Ara, his private yacht. 

When Mr. Vanderbilt was crusing 
in the South Seas about 15 years ago 
he met Miss Hoppin at Jaluit in the 
Marshalls. He watched her at work 
and on the eve before he sailed away 
he invited her to dinner on board his 
yacht, a red letter event for an iso- 
lated American. She could not come. 
A native boy whom she was nursing 
through a serious illness had reached 
a crisis. In expressing her regret 
Miss Hoppin said, wistfully, "Please 
fly Old Glory as you leave port. ' ' 

Michigan-born, Miss Hoppin was a 
graduate of Oberlin College, Class of 
1888. Prior to going to the South 
Seas she taught school for two years 
in Honolulu. During her 43 years in 
those magic islands of Micronesia she 



came home to the U. S. A. only three 
times. 

Miss Hoppin arrived in the South 
Sea Islands on Morning Star IV, one 
of six small white missionary sailing 
ships sent out by the American Board 
since 1856. Morning Star VI, now at 
work in the islands, sailed from Bos- 
ton Harbor, July 27, 1947. 

During her period of service, Miss 
Hoppin learned at least three of the 
native tongues and since retirement 
to Wisconsin in 1938 has been working 
on a translation of the Bible into the 
Kusaien tongue. 

Among other things Miss Hoppin 
headed up a School for Girls on Ku- 
saie, Caroline Islands. Early in her 
career a devastating tropical hurri- 
cane swent the island for three days 
and three nights. The school and Miss 
Hoppin 's home were threatened. 
Somehow she kept the panic-stricken 
girls under control and on the second 
day, with windows shattered, walls 
swaying and water pouring down 
through the broken roof, she gathered 
them into a dry corner for family 
prayers. 

Her quiet confidence in God re- 
assured the girls and they went to bed. 
The house was spared and no one in- 
jured. "Mother Hoppin is not afraid 
of anything ! ' ' said her girls from then 
on. 

Religion and a sense of humor were 
well blended in Jessie Hoppin. When, 
again, in 1905 another terrific hurri- 
cane swept over her island it left the 
people literally homeless. The school 
building was destroyed along with the 
rest. The frightened pupils crowded 
into a hollow on the hillside with their 
teacher. Not a shred of Miss Hop- 
pin's personal possessions were left. 
Her beloved library lay strewn about 
the hill in sodden piles of papery pulp. 
It was then she gathered the girls 
around her and laughingly said : 

"What a good advertisement we 
could put in the Missionary Herald. 
It ought to bring results. We could 
say, 'The girls' school at Kusaie — 
running water in every room and a 
circulating library on the hill !' " 

In World War I during a period 
when Germany controlled the Mar- 
shalls, Miss Hoppin was stranded on 
Jaluit. She found a miserably neg- 
lected leper colony herded there by 
the German government. Indignant, 
she turned the full force of her wrath 
on the German officials and gained 
permission to visit, teach and help the 
lepers. She brought about improved 
sanitary condition and provided 
means of diversion. When the Japa- 
( Continued on page 13.) 



February 10, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Church Women at Work 

With Emphasis on Missions 

Mrs. W. J. Andes, Editor 
637 S. Sunset Drive, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



WORLD DAY OF PRAYER— 1949. 

Friday, March 4, 1949, has been 
set aside as the World Day of Prayer, 
when we are invited to join with all 
peoples in a fellowship of prayer. 

It seems especially significant that 
China should make her contribution 
on this year's program. The theme 
for this year's service — Psalm 121 :5, 
"The Lord Is Thy Keeper" — was 
given us by Dr. Doris Hsu, acting 
president of Hwa Nan College of Foo- 
chow, China. The Call to Worship 
was selected by Mrs. C. C. Chen, Dean 
of Women, Shanghai University, and 
the Prayer (on page 5 of the pro- 
gram) was written by Mrs. Henry H. 
Lin, president of the National YWCA 
in China. Of course, the final ar- 
rangement was made by our World 
Day of Prayer Committee, of which 
Mrs. Welthy Honsinger Fisher is 
chairman. It is an inspiring service 
of worship and one that should be en- 
joyed by more women than ever be- 
fore. The program in 1948 was mailed 
to seventy-four countries around the 
world. 

The leader's packet, as usual, con- 
tains all material for a well-planned 
service, in fact, one copy of the serv- 
ice. In addition there is a Children's 
Service, as well as "Helpful Hints" 
for committees. The price of the 
packet is 35c and it may be secured 
from United Council of Church Wo- 
men, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York 10, 
N. Y. Additional programs for adults 
and young people are 5c each, or $5 
for 100. The children's programs, 5c 
each, or $4 for 100. Delivery of or- 
ders, received after February 18 can- 
not be assured. Be sure, if you have 
not already done so, to order your ma- 
terial immediately. There is also 
available a new film strip on World 
Day of Prayer projects. ' ' The March 
of Missions" includes pictures of 
work in India, migrant camps in the 
United States, the Navajo, boys and 
girls in Turkey, showing the mission 
work our church women do together. 
The film strip with accompanying 
commentary may be purchased for 
two dollars from the office of the 
Home Missions Council, 297 Fourth 
Avenue, New York 10, N. Y. 

Is it too much to hope that every 
church in our Southern Convention 



might have its women either conduct- 
ing a service on this day, or uniting 
whenever possible with women of oth- 
er denominations, offering our peti- 
tions to God, for our world in her 
great need? 

It has been suggested that fine ways 
to undergird the World Day of 
Prayer are that each woman spend at 
least fifteen minutes each day in 
prayer, Bible study and meditation; 
that Ave talk to our friends about 
prayer and what it means to us ; that 
we get people to thinking about 
prayer, in a new way ; that we organ- 
ize or join a small prayer group which 
will meet regularly, thus joining with 
other small groups around the world, 
meeting for prayer and fellowship. 

Your Interdenominational Coopera- 
tion Chairman would appreciate any 
reports of the way in which your so- 
ciety spent its World Day of Prayer. 
We kneel how weak; 
We rise how full of power. 
Mrs. Robt. A. Whitten, Ch'm'n, 
Inter 'denominational Cooperation. 



WORKSHOP FOR LEADERS OF 
CHILDREN. 

Mrs. Carl R. Key, our Children's 
Superintendent for the North Caro- 
lina Woman's Conference, has recent- 
ly sent out this announcement to chil- 
dre's leaders in North Carolina: 
Interdenominational Workshop for 
Leaders of Children. 
Place— First Presbyterian Church, 

305 E. Main St., Durham, N. C. 
Time— Friday, February 25, 10 :00 a. 

m., Saturday, 26th, 12 :30 p. m. 
Purpose — To provide practical train- 
ing and experience in methods of 
creative teaching of children and to 
give opportunity for sharing ideas 
across denominational lines. 
Program — • 

Friday — Morning Session. 

10 :00 Opening Worship. 

10 :30 Three Workshop Groups — each 
delegate choosing one : Pre- 
School, Primarv, Junior. 

12:30 Lunch. 

Friday — Afternoon Session . 
2 :00 Workshop Groups continued. 
4:00 Session on Recreation for all 

three Workshop Groups. 
5:30 Dinner. 



Page Nine. 

Friday — Evening Session. 
6 :45 Visual Aid Previews and Book 
Exhibit. 

8:00 Address: "The Church and 
the Home Teaching Togeth- 
er." 

Saturday — Morning Session. 
9 :00 Workshop Groups continued. 
12 :00 Closing Worship. 

Leadership — 

Workshop Groups. 

Pre-School and Beginner — Miss Mar- 
garet Thompson, Director of Week- 
day Kindergarten, Myers Park 
Presbyterian Church, Charlotte, N. 
C. 

Primary. — Miss Rosalie Wilson, Direc- 
tor of Religious Education, St. 
Paul's Episcopal Church, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. 

Junior — Mrs. Joseph C. Mason, Di- 
rector of Children's Work in the 
Winston - Salem District of t h e 
Western N. C. Methodist Confer- 
ence, S'upt. of Junior Department, 
Centenary Methodist Church, Win- 
ston-Salem, N. C. 

Special Leaders. 

Music — Miss Winifred Bodie, a lead- 
er in the field of church music with 
children, United Lutheran, Troy, 
N. C. 

Recreation — Rev. Leonard Detwiler, 
Evangelical and Reformed minister 
of Lenoir, N. C. 

Address : ' ' The Home and the Church 
Teaching Together" — Dr. George 
Heaton, pastor of Myers Park Bap- 
tist Church, Charlotte, N. C. 

Begistration — All those who work or 
would like to work with children in 
church schools are invited to at- 
tend. Please register by February 
15, if possible. Registration fee-, $3. 
Send it to Miss Frances C. Query, 
College Station, Durham, N. C. The 
conference has been arranged on an 
interracial basis, and there will be 
no segregation in the sessions. Re- 
quests for reservations at hotels and 
tourist homes should be sent di- 
rectly to the place of choice. 



JOHNSON'S GROVE (IVOR, VA.). 

Our Missionary Society at John- 
son's Grove as we closed the year, 
have had a program at each meeting 
with a good attendance and each tak- 
ing much interest in the work. We 
have visited, sent cards, flowers and 
trays to the sick and shut-ins and 
clothes and three boxes for the needy 
in our county. We sent $35.00 for 
Shaowu, $10.00 for Convention, and 
$10.00 for Life Membership. 

(Continued on page 13.) 



Page Ten. THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



FOR THE CHILDREN 

Mrs. R. L. House, Editor 



A doctor has found a way to help 
people who have the worst of all sick- 
nesses, that of the mind. "Crazy" 
we sometimes call them. This doctor 
puts the sick people to work. He 
makes them keep so busy that they 
forget to be sick or to worry about 
themselves. 

Lots and lots of people worry about 
being "so busy" and "worn out." A 
lot of the "bawlings out" you get 
from your mother or teacher being 
"so tired" and therefore cross with 
you. Now I'll say a word of defense 
for mother. I do find it trying when 
five children are in my house all yell- 
ing at once, but that doesn't happen 
too often, usually they yell one or two 
at the time. 

It seems to me that a good way to 
learn to keep busy is now. If you 
have decided what you want to do or 
be, you can work hard at that while 
in school, have extra school activities, 
your church school interests and a 
hobby. 

May I recommend art ? One need 
not be greatly talented. Have you 
heard of the great, long word, de- 
coupage? Sounds awful, doesn't it? 
It just means, "the art of cutting." 
This kind of work was started in 
Europe. The French people are mas- 
ters of it and the Portuguese make it 
the most interesting. You can do it, too. 
Collect pictures, usually colored, but 
some like black and white, and cut 
them out carefully. Decide what you 
want to use for a background — a tray, 
box, chest and place your plictures 
until they make a lovely scene. Then 
paste them carefully using wallpaper 
paste or rubber cement. After it has 
dried well, varnish with a clear, thin 
lacquer or varnish. Tt is an art and 
there is more to it than cutting and 
pasting. Practice makes beautiful 
scenes. 

Montage is the word used to de- 
scribe pressing flowers to put in a 
tray, or a glove, fan or an old valen- 
tine. Helen Hayes likes to collect 
these and so did Queen Victoria. 

If you have any talent for drawing 
or painting it will give you life-long 
pleasure. Even the copyists have 
great fun. 



Children brought up in Sunday 
school are seldom brought up in court. 

— Basil Miller. 



GETTING USED TO HARRY'S 
TEASING. 

By Janette Stevenson Murray. 
(American Mother for 1947.) 

Issued by the National Kindergarten 
Association. 

Mrs. Wood rolled out the piecrust 
hurriedly ; in an hour the men would 
be in from the fields. Just then four- 
year-old Martha ran in crying, ' ' Bud- 
dy says he's going to cut off my doll's 
curls ! ' ' 

"He's only joking. Don't bother 
me; run away, that's a dear!" Mrs. 
Wood gave Martha a gentle push and 
turned to her cousin, Ada. "Buddy's 
such a tease. Martie will just have to 
learn to pay no attention to him." 

Ada, who worked in an insurance 
office, was spending her vacation here 
at the farm, helping her cousin. That 
night, after their work was done, the 
two women rested on the porch. 

"Oh, those katydids!" Ada ex- 
claimed. "I never liked them." 

"Why, the rhythm of their music 
rests me. Katydid — she did — she did. 
Katydid — she did — she did." 

"Perhaps it's because I connect 
them with the darkness. I dislike the 
darkness very much." 

"I've always known that and won- 
dered why. " 

"It's because of my brother Har- 
ry's teasing. I thought of that today 
when Martie ran in to you." 

"Tell me about it. Your experi- 
ence may help me to deal more wisely 
with Buddy's teasing." 

' ' Yes, I 'd like to tell you. After I 
was three years old, it was Mother's 
custom to send my brother and me up- 
stairs to get into our own beds alone. 
Harry was just a year and a half old- 
er than I. Mother had far too much 
to do, but it would have been wiser to 
have left some of the housework un- 
done, in order to have taken the time 
to see us into our beds. Harry was 
always teasing me. He was hardly 
more than a baby himself when he be- 
gan, and, of course, he didn't realize 
how cruelly I suffered. One of his 
favorite habits was to slip upstairs 
ahead of me and then, as I neared the 
top of the dark enclosed stairway, to 
jump out at me with a loud 'boo ! ' It 
never ceased to be terrifying." 

"Didn't your mother hear you 
scream?" 



February 10, 1949. 

PEN PORTRAITS OF THE DISCIPLES 
OF CHRIST. 

By Samuel Lawrence Johnson, 
Pastor, Park Manor Church, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

PI. JAMES. 

Jesus called James and John ' ' Sons 
of Thunder" obviously because of 
their inherited characteristics of am- 
bition, ardor, intensity, vehemence 
and warm affection. 

The brothers Avere either partners 
in the same fishing business, as Peter 
and Andrew, or were their very close 
friends. One day as they were fish- 
ing near the shore Jesus called to 
them, "Follow me and I will make 
you fishers of men. ' ' They left their 
boat to their father and the hired ser- 
vants and followed the Master. 

James and John had probably 
known Jesus for some time as their 
mother Salome was Mary's sister thus 
making the brothers first cousins of 
our Lord. The family, it would seem, 
was quite well off for they had con- 
siderable intimacy with Caiaphas, the 
High Priest. 

(Continued on page 15.) 



"Oh yes, but sometimes she was 
down in the cellar, and besides, I sup- 
pose she became used to my crying. 
Perahps she thought I needed to learn 
to regard Harry's teasing as a joke." 

' ' Well, didn 't you get used to it in 
time?" 

"No, it was never a joke to me; it 
was repeated torment. I suffered ter- 
ribly. It not only gave me a fear of 
the dark but also developed the obses- 
sion that somebody would jump out at 
me from the darkness. I remember 
always being afraid of this. At first 
it was when I had to go out into the 
dark yard for my little wagon. But it 
came to be connected with all dark- 
ness. I could scarcely bring myself to 
open the door of an unlighted room 
for fear someone would pounce upon 
me. I had the same feeling about the 
cellar, the closets, the space under the 
bed. Even now I suffer from this 
fear whenever I am on the streets 
after dark. I never go alone if I can 
help it. When I do, if I am obliged 
to pass dark alleys or shadowy clumps 
of bushes, I instinctively hold my 
breath and quicken my steps, for I am 
still apprehensive that someone may 
jump out at me." 

"But Aunt Ella is such an intelli- 
gent woman," interposed Mrs. Wood. 

"I know, but this just shows how 
even an intelligent, loving mother can 
make the mistake of allowing one child 
to persist in teasing another. ' ' 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Eleven. 



Youth at Work in the Church 

Ann Truitt, Editor; Helen Jackson, C. B. Twiddy, Assoiates. 



YOUTH WORK— "THE FRONT LINE 
IN THE BATTLE OF THE 
CENTURY." 

By D. Elton Trueblood.* 
The American nation is today 
marked by a great hope, shadowed by 
a great fear. The hope is that we may 
be able to keep our promise of what a 
free and just life in the modern world 
might be ; the fear is that we may be- 
come so bogged down by our own com- 
placency, our self-righteousness, and 
our moral confusion that the promise 
cannot be kept. The tragedy of an 
America in which we have magnificent 
resources and opportunities but in 
which the whole enterprise is under- 
mined by inner human failure, is a 
tragedy of almost inconceivable pro- 
portions. The problem of our time is 
the problem of whether we shall be 
able to develop resources before it is 
too late. This is a problem for our 
youth more than for anyone else, be- 
cause it is they who might best be 
caught by a great and flaming faith 
that would change both them and 
their world. I see no way in which 
this faith can become a fact except by 
a recovery of basic Christianity. Any- 
one, therefore, who gives his nights 
and days to the spiritual undergirding 
of American youth is struggling on 
the battlefront of the century. 



YOUTH NEEDS TRIUMPHANT 
FAITH. 

By Edward F. Crane, Editor, 
The Free Press Burlington., Vt. 
[This statement was written at the re- 
quest of the United Christian Youth Move- 
ment, Chicago, endorsing National Youth 
Week, January 30-February 6, 1949, in 
the United States and Canada.] 

Probably no generation in the his- 
tory of the world has faced a greater 
responsibility than the generation of 
American youth now in the schools of 
the nation. They will be the leaders 
in world affairs during the last half of 
the twentieth century. For the na- 
tions of the world are looking to 
America for leadership in science, in 
commerce, in finance and — most im- 
portant of all — in a way of life which 

*Mr. Trueblood is a Professor at Earl- 
ham College, Richmond, Indiana, and is the 
author of "Alternative to Futility," "Foun- 
dations for Reconstruction" and "Predica- 
ment of Modern Man." 



will give hope for the future of man- 
kind. 

Unless the youth of America have 
been imbued, through the home, the 
church and the school, with a faith 
which rises above every temporal de- 
feat, which will triumph over every 
obstacle of this world, they will be un- 
able to cope with the problems which 
will face them. Nowhere is such a 
faith available except in the teachings 
of Jesus Christ, whose power to save 
men and to inspire them to save others 
was demonstrated on this earth nearly 
2,000 years ago. That power is still 
working in the world today. It is the 
hope — the only hope of struggling and 
bewildered mankind. 



CITES DANGER TO NATION'S 
YOUTH. 

By Luther W. Youngdahl, 
Governor, State of Minnesota. 

[This statement was written at the re- 
quest of the United Christian Youth Move- 
ment, Chicago, endorsing National Youth 
Week, January 30-Februrary 6, 1949, in 
the United States and Canada.] 

To our children, we recognize nu- 
merous obligations. We readily as- 
sume that they are entitled to a home, 
to food and clothing, and education, 
the opportunity to live in a free na- 
tion. All this is true and necessary. 
But it is not enough. We must also 
provide them with the example and 
guidance that will enable them to 
grow spiritually. It is in this crucial 
matter that too many modern parents 
fail their children. Fifty per cent of 
the children of America receive no re- 
ligious training. 

The lo'hger I live the more I am 
convinced that the most precious gift 
we can give to our children is the 
knowledge and acceptance of God, a 
true Christian philosophy of life — as 
a real source of strength with which 
to meet the tragedies and disappoint- 
ments that will surely come. If we 
give our children all else and neglect 
to nurture their spiritual resources, 
then I say we have failed them miser- 
ably. And that is exactly what too 
many American parents are doing to- 
day ! That is the greatest danger to 
the youth of our nation. The solu- 
tion lies in religious influence in the 
home and a return to church member- 
ship and participation. 



SUFFOLK YOUTH FELLOWSHIP. 

The Christian Youth Fellowship of 
the Suffolk Christian Church is pre- 
paring a directory of the church which 
will include a complete membership 
roll with addresses, the organizations 
of the church and a number of pic- 
tures of organizations and interior and 
exterior views of the building. This 
active group of young people hold 
regular meetings every Sunday eve- 
ning conducted by themseves and on 
themes they themselves desire to dis- 
cuss. Their officers are : John G. 
Truitt, Jr., president; Miss Margaret 
Taylor, vice-president; Miss Nancy 
Speight, secretary ; Charles Johnson, 
treasurer; Miss Florence King, pi- 
anist ; and their adult sponsors are 
Miss Louise Lilly and Mrs. John G. 
Truitt. 

They have been celebrating Youth 
Week with special committee meet- 
ings on their church directory and 
their special programs for the regular 
evening service of the church on Sun- 
day night. They took over at the- 
regular 7:30 service with the Girls' 
Chorus singing the special music and 
with other young people simulating an 
international news broadcast of the 
activities of Christian youth through- 
out the world. Members of the Chris- 
tian Youth Fellowship were invited to 
the parsonage at 6 :30 for a social hour 
with refreshments, on Sunday night 
as a part of their Youth Week pro- 
gram. 

The young people of the Suffolk 
Christian Church take an active part 
in the Young People's Missionary 
Conference of the Eastern Virginia 
Conference of Congregational Chris- 
tian Churches, and also the Youth 
Fellowship of Eastern Virginia. They 
are to be found in almost every ac- 
tivity of the local church, and their 
total gifts in money would be a siz- 
able sum. John G. Truitt. 



CITATIONS AWARDED. 
(Continued from page 2.) 

A great traveler, Dr. Kincheloe's 
journeys have included areas where 
the work of the Board of Home Mis- 
sions is being carried on. 

Dr. Kincheloe is an expert on the 
analysis of the relationship of 
churches to their communities and 
constituents. He has a basic interest 
in the broader field of sociology of 
religion in which he seeks to see the 
relationship of religious institutions 
to the other aspects of society. He 
also applies to religious institutions 
themselves the methods of analysis of 
social sciences. 



Page Twelve. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 10, 1949. 



Sunday School Lesson 

By Rev. H. S. Hardcastle, D. D. 



JESUS CHOOSES THE TWELVE. 

Lesson VIII— February 20, 1949. 

Memory Selection : You did not 
choose me, but I chose you and ap- 
pointed you that you should go and 
bear fruit. — John 15 :16. 

Lesson : Matthew 4 :18-22 ; Mark 1 : 
16-20; 3:13-19; Luke 6:12-16. 

Devotional Reading : Luke 5 :1-11. 
Their Master's Voice. 

One of the greatest tributes to the 
Master's manhood is the fact that 
when He called the first disciples, 
Peter and Andrew, James and John, 
fishermen, they left all and followed 
Him. There was a note of authority 
in His voice that found a response 
deep within them. They knew then 
that He Avas Master. They saw in 
Him a man's Man. They knew that 
He spoke with authority. And they 
rose up and folowed Him. And what 
they sensed then, the centuries have 
confirmed. Jesus Christ was no weak, 
pale, effeminate, sissy, spineless, 
dreamy-eyed idealist, but a Man, the 
world's finest type of manhood, the 
Master of Men. 

The Master Called Men. 

If there were any real he-men, 
rough, rugged, hard-boiled men any- 
where in Palestine in Jesus' day, they 
were fishermen. The very nature of 
their trade called for out-of-door, red- 
blooded men. They had hair on their 
chests. There was nothing soft about 
them. This was true of the other dis- 
ciples. Matthew or Levi was a tax 
collector and that Avas a man's job. 
Simon, the Zealot was a fiery revolu- 
tionist. Judas Iscariot evidently was 
a shrewd business man — the disciples 
elected him treasurer of the group — 
and so on down the line. There are 
some people who think that it is on 
the sissy side to be religious, that 
there is nothing in following Jesus 
that has any appeal to a young man, 
or a real man. Let him read the New 
Testament. Let him read history. 
And he will find that some of the 
hardiest, hard-bitten souls, and many 
of the greatest men have been faith- 
ful and devoted followers of Jesus, 
men who delighted to yield to Him 
the highest allegiance and the most 
consistent obedience. 



The Master Called Men of Varied 
Temperament. 

These men were not poured in a 
mold and all made alike. Even though 
there were Twelve in the inner group, 
.there were the "fifty-seven varieties" 
of disposition and temperament among 
them. Some of them were aggressive, 
temperamental, impulsive, bold, im- 
petuous. Like Peter, and like James 
and John whom Jesus himself nick- 
named "the sons of Thunder." 
Others were quiet and thoughtful, 
some even inclined to be skeptical, 
others of a very practical mind. One 
of them was a revolutionist, Simon 
the Zealot. Some were idealist, oth- 
ers quite practical. Some were lead- 
ers and executives, others were run- 
of-mine folks. All were Galileans ex- 
cept Judas. The point is that, now 
as then, Jesus calls and can use all 
types and temperaments of men and 
women. There is a place for all in 
Lis kingdom. 

The Master Called Men to a 
Way of Life. 
He said unto them "Follow me." 
Nothing about a creed. Nothing about 
some fine point of doctrine. Nothing 
about some interpretation of Scrip- 
ture. Nothing about some ceremony 
or form of service. They have a place 
of course, but they are not the most 
important things. Jesus simply asked 
these men to follow Him, to come aft- 
er Him, to go with Him. He called 
them to a way of life. It was so in 
the beginning, is now, and evermore 
shall be, world without end. Chris- 
tianity is primarily and essentially a 
way of life. Being a Christian means 
being Christ's man, living ' Christ's 
way of life. 

The Master Called Men to a Better 
Way of Life. 

' ' Come ye after me and I will make 
you to become fishers of men. ' ' They 
were already fishers, at least four of 
them were. But He said He would 
make them to become "fishers of 
men." Here as everywhere and al- 
ways the Master gave new dignity and 
meaning and glory to the common- 
place ways of life. Fishers . . . fishers 
of men. How we need to see our tasks 
in the light of their larger meanings 
and possibilities. And Christ can do 
just that. Life with Him has new 



meaning and direction and dignity 
and beauty and power. 

The Master Oalled Men to a 
Way of Becoming. 

"I will make you to become " 

Character like heaven is not reached 
by a single bound. They had not ar- 
rived suddeidy and they would not 
arrive for a long time. But they were 
to become, to become, to become. 
"Thou art Simon . . . thou shalt be 
Peter. ' ' Those who think that getting 
into the church or the kingdom is the 
thing, the only thing that counts, need 
to catch again the meaning of Jesus ' 
words about becoming. It is su- 
premely important that men be born 
into the kingdom of God. But it is 
just as important that they grow in 
grace. Souls do not grow without at- 
tention any more than bodies grow 
without food and attention. Man 
cannot live by bread alone. Perhaps 
a man can be just as good without go- 
ing to church as the man who goes to 
church. He can, but the chances are 
that he won't. These men were to 
keep their faces to the light and their 
hearts open to the, truth, so that they 
might become, that increasingly they 
should move closer to the stature of 
the fulness of Christ. 

The Master Called Men to a 
Fellowship. 

First of all to a fellowship of spirit. 
Matthew says that He chose the Twelve 
that they might be with Him. He 
wanted them to be with Him, both for 
their sakes and for His sake. He 
wanted them to catch His spirit as 
well as to understand His plans. He 
wanted to put the imprint of His 
gracious spirit upon their lives so that 
thev might reproduce His character 
and express His spirit. He wanted to 
train them and thus to multiply His 
own impacts upon the world. But He 
also wanted them to be with Him for 
His own sake. He was the Son of God 
but He was also the Son of Man. He 
liked folks. He wanted to be with 
folks. And He wanted folks to be 
with Him. He needed them even as 
they needed Him. There was value in 
this fellowship of spirit. There is 
value in it iioav. Too many of us are 
so busy doing things for the Master, 
that like Martha Ave spend all too 
little time in being with the Master. 
The world is too much with us. 

He also Avanted them to be with 
Him so that "He might send them 
forth to preach and to heal." Relig- 
ion is not to be locked up in the safe. 
Christians are not to save the world 
by withdrawing from the Avorld. Wor- 



February 10, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Thirteen. 



ship is to issue in service. I like the 
motto engraved on the plate at the 
door of our sanctuary, "Enter to 
Worship, Depart to Serve. ' ' 

Jesus did not tell these men that if 
they fellowed Him He would take 
them to heaven, or that they would go 
to heaven. That is involved in dis- 
cipleship of course. But He called 
men to service in this world. He called 
them to the fellowship in the task of 
the Kingdom. They were to be with 
Him, to catch His spirit, to share His 
secrets, and then they were to go out 
to help and to heal the people of the 
world. And again, it was thus in the 
beginning, is now, and evermore shall 
be world without end. 

Jesus calls us; by thy mercies, 
Saviour may we hear thy call, 
Give our hearts to thine obedience, 
Serve and love thee best of all. 



RECOMMENDATIONS VOTED 
BY CLEVELAND COUNCIL. 
(Continued from page 5.) 

gational Christian Churches; and then 
finally approved the "Basis of Un- 
ion"; 

Whereas, the General Council, in 
June, 1948, further directed that the 
"Basis of Union," with the Interpre- 
tations, be again submitted to the 
churches : in consequence of which 
the percentage of all the churches vot- 
ing, which have registered approval 
of the "Basis of Union," as of the 
date of January 1, 1949, was 72.2 per 
cent; since when such favorable per- 
centage has been increased to 72.77 
per cent ; 

Whereas, the General Council in 
accordance with a plan of procedure 
voted by it in June, 1948, is now sum- 
moned into Special Session in Cleve- 
land on February 4, 1949, "to de- 
termine in accordance with the vote 
of the General Council on June 22, 

1948, whether the percentage of the 
churches voting approval of the ' Basis 
of Union' with the Evangelical and 
Reformed Church, and of the Inter- 
pretations of the 'Basis of Union' 
adopted by the General Council on 
June 22, 1948, is sufficient to warrant 
the consummation of the union ; if the 
percentage be found sufficient, to take 
the steps necessary to consummate the 
union; and to consider and act upon 
such other business as may properly 
be brought before it"; 

Now, therefore, the Commission 
on Interchurch Relations and Chris- 
tian Unity, meeting at Cleveland, 
Ohio, this third day of February, 

1949, and reviewing all pertinent data 



available to it, hereby recommends to 
the General Council : 

1. That the General Council makes 
a finding and determination that the 
percentage of Congregational Chris- 
tian Churches approving the Basis of 
Union with its Interpretations war- 
rants the consummation of the Union 
in accordance with the Basis of Union 
and the Interpretations. 

2. That such consummation be con- 
tingent, however, upon the approval, 
by the General Synod of the Evangel- 
ical and Reformed Church and by its 
constituent Synods, of the Interpre- 
tations to the "Basis of Union" here- 
inabove referred to, in order that both 
parties may be united in their under- 
standing and acceptance of the same 
instruments. 

3. That the General Council in- 
struct its Executive Committee to as- 
sign to the several Conferences quotas 
which together shall provide approxi- 
mately three hundred of its members 
as delegates and authorize such dele- 
gates, subject to the foregoing condi- 
tions, to represent the General Coun- 
cil at a joint meeting, called in accord- 
ance with the provisions of Article X- 
A of the "Basis of Union," which 
meeting shall constitute the first meet- 
ing of the General Synod of the United 
Church; empowering the said dele- 
gates to take such actions as shall be 
in conformity with the principles and 
provisions of the "Basis of Union," 
the said Interpretations, and the votes 
of the General Council pertaining to 
this union. 

4. That the General Council, at a 
subsequent meeting to be called at the 
discretion of the Executive Commit- 
tee of the General Council, make such 
disposition of its capital funds and 
property rights of all types and desig- 
nations, as shall be in accordance with 
the instruments under which such 
funds and property rights may now 
be held by the General Council, and 
as shall be further consistent with the 
provisions of the "Basis of Union" 
and the Interpretations. 

5. That the Moderator of the Gen- 
eral Council appoint a Commission of 
lawyers to study and, if necessary, 
draft such instruments as will facili- 
tate its continued operation subse- 
quent to the Union. 

6. That the Executive Committee 
be authorized to take such other and 
further action, from time to time, as 
shall be necessary and advisable to 
execute the foregoing recommenda- 
tions, if adopted by the General Coun- 
cil, and as shall be directed toward the 
consummation of the Union. 



MISSIONARY CAREER ENDS. 
(Continued from page 8.) 
nese took over she was interned for 
the duration. 

When World War II came, Miss 
Hoppin had retired to the U.S.A. 
where she was a great help as a re- 
source person to the U. S. Army and 
Navy authorities because of her wide 
knowledge of the Marshall and Caro- 
line Islands and their people. 

And so has passed an American wo- 
man who over a period of 43 years in 
the South Seas witnessed there the 
coming of the German Armada and 
later the assembling of the Japanese 
Fleet ; who cast her first vote for a 
President of the United States when 
she was home on a rare furlough in 
1932, and who died, as she lived, work- 
ing for her "children," the lovable, 
grateful people of the Marshall and 
Caroline Islands. 



CHURCH WOMEN AT WORK. 
(Continued from page 9.) 

I wish we could have shared our 
guest speakers with you. At our 
March meeting we had Mrs. Lucy 
Stewart, Superintendent of Public 
Welfare of our county, who gave us 
an inspiring message. In April, Mrs. 
W. T. Harrrell, our District Super- 
intendent, gave us an instructive and 
most enjoyable address at our church. 

Mr. Kimball, our pastor, used the 
slide, ' ' Philippine Horizon, ' ' at our 
June meeting. Seeing these pictures, 
we realized the condition under which 
our missionaries live and work. 

At our August meeting we had at 
church with Harry Wellon, a mis- 
sionary friend, who spent several 
years in Jamaica. He told of the Is- 
land, its people, and the work he had 
done with them. 

In September, Mrs. Robert Kimball 
reviewed our mission book, Committed 
Unto Us, which was very instructive 
and enjoyed by all. 

What could be more fitting to end 
our year's work than a party in honor 
of Lewis Byers Jackson. We were in- 
vited into the dining room, where a 
birthday party had been prepared by 
the committee. The table on which 
were ligted candles, plates of ice 
cream, cakes and mints had a center- 
piece with a lovely cake in pink and 
white with a ' ' Happy Birthday Baby 
Jackson" and a bank in which we 
dropped our offering for Lewis' Life 
Membership. The cake, a gift to the 
society by our president, was present- 
ed to our pastor and his wife at the 
close of the party. 

Mart E. Williams. 



Page Fourteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 10, 1949. 



1 The Orphanage 1 

i Chas. D. Johnston, Supt. Ij 

Dear Friends: 

The Christian Orphanage year runs 
with the calendar year; that is, from 
January 1 to December 31. So if I 
mention this year any time in my let- 
ter I mean the year, 1949, inclusive. 

Since the Orphanage has been in 
existence it has largely depended on 
monthly Sunday school offerings to 
pay its bills at the end of each month. 
Up to last year, the churches and Sun- 
day schools have sent in their offerings 
monthly, which has been a wonderful 
help in paying our bills. While it 
may be a little more trouble to the 
Sunday school secretary-treasurer, to 
do this way, it will help your orphan- 
age superintendent so much. We have 
had the reputation for the last thirty 
years of paying the orphanage bills at 
the first of each month. We want to 
keep up that record. 

Last year, 1948, quite a number of 
our churches did not send us an of- 
fering until the end of the year. It 
made it very hard to meet our bills 
through the year. We run on a month- 
ly basis, and everyone here expects 
their salary on the first of each month. 
The farm help want their pay weekly. 
In order to help us hold our good rep- 
utation as to paying our bills, we hope 
you will send in your offerings month- 
ly, or at least quarterly. 

The children's health has been re- 
markably good up to this time so far 
this winter. The time has been when 
they had to walk through the rain to 
school and get their clothes wet. At 
that time the public school had a poor 
heating system, and the children sat 
in their damp clothes and developed 
colds, and sometimes pneumonia. But 
we are happy to say we now have a 
modern heating system in our public 
school, and the orphanage has a large 
truck with a heavy waterproof cover, 
and when it is raining we back the 
truck up to the steps and load them 
in and haul them to school. Then we 
go back after them in the afternoon 
when it is raining. Since making 
this arrangement we have had but 
very few colds and not a case of pneu- 
monia in a number of years. I have 
heard it said that "an ounce of care 
is worth a pound of cure. ' ' We have 
learned that in our long experience in 
this work. 

Chas. D. Johnston, 
Superintendent. 



REPORT FOR FEBRUARY 10, 1949. 
Sunday School Monthly Offerings. 



Amount brought forward $ 731.67 

Eastern N. C. Conference: 
Oak Level 2.00 

Eastern Va. Conference : 



Bethlehem (Nans.) S. S. .$20.05 
Liberty Spring S. S 7.00 

27.05 

N. C. & Va. Conference: 

Bethel S. S $ 3.30 

Greensboro, First 95.35 

Happy Home 9.00 

Hines Chapel S. S 6.00 

113.65 

Western N. C. Conference : 

Albemarle $20.00 

Shady Grove 1.00 

21.00 

Ga. Conference : 



Bethany (Olive Pearson M. S.) . 2.50 

Total this week from churches $ 166.20 

Total this year from churches $ 897.87 
Special Offerings. 

Amount brought forward $1,481.91 



Mr. Hairfield, children ... $ 20.00 

Mr. Russell, for Kaye . . . 100.00 

Mrs. Black, children 20.00 

Mrs. Kinch, children 15.00 

Suffolk Welfare Dept. . . . 30.00 

Sale of eggs 2.40 

Cash, Jesse Patrick 5.00 

J. B. Taylor, rent 50.00 

Mable Haith, rent 1.50 

Miss Gertrude Herring . . 5.00 

A Friend 5.00 



— 253.90 

Alamance County: 

Doris Ward 20.00 

Total this week from 

Special Offerings $ 273.90 

Total this year from 

Special Offerings $1,755.81 

Grand total for the week ... $ 440.10 

Grand total for the year . . . $2,653.68 



A PEN PORTRAIT. 
(Continued from page 10.) 

James was perhaps the older and is 
usually named first whenever they 
are mentioned. His name is original- 
ly the same as Jacob meaning "sup- 
planter." We hear little or nothing 
of him until about fourteen years aft- 
er the Crucifixion when he was put to 
death, the first of the twelve to die. 

Herod Agrippa was the grandson 
of Herod the Great. Herodias, who 
was the cause of the beheading of 
John the Baptist, was his sister. He 
reigned with great splendour over a 
kingdom larger than his grandfather, 
and was quite popular. He tried to 
increase that popularity still further 
by putting down the rising Christian 
heresy. And in 44 A. D. shortly after 
the Passover he had James, the bold 
and uncompromising, put to death, 
and Peter thrown in prison. 

The legend of Saint Iago (James) 
indicates that he carried the gospel 
story to Spain. He returned again to 
visit Jerusalem where he met his 
death. Afterward his body was 
placed on board a ship and taken to 
Spain where it is supposed to rest in 
Compostella, 



Benedict Arnold once asked a loyal 
captain what the Americans would 
do with him if they caught him. He 
replied, "I believe they would first 
cut off your lame leg, which was 
wounded in the cause of freedom and 
virtue at Quebec, and bury it with 
the honours of war, and afterwards 
hang the remainder of your body on 
a gibbet. ' ' — E. Foster. 



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February 10, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Fifteen. 



In Memoriam 



JONES. 

In loving memory of Mrs. Daisy Ballard 
Jones, we, the members of the Franklin 
Congregational Christian Church, desire to 
honor her memory and express our appreci- 
ation for all of her faithful and consecrated 
services. 

Although a shut-in for a number of years 
which prevented her from attending services, 
we felt she was always present in prayer, 
and while on September 5, 1948, heaven be- 
came richer for her going, we mourn her 
loss. May we ever strive to imitate her 
good example by being more faithful in our 
duties to God's cause. 

We bow in humble submission to God's 
will and extend to her loved ones our deep- 
est sympathy and recommend that a copy of 
these resolutions be sent to The Christian 
Sun for publication, a copy to her family, 
and a copy recorded in the minutes of our 
church. 

Mrs. E. R. BRYANT, JR., 
Mrs. B. V. HARGRAVE, 
Mrs. E. P. JONES, 

Committee. 



MATTHEWS. 

On October 20, 948, our heavenly Father 
in his infinite wisdom called home Mrs. 
George M. Matthews who was a faithful 
member of the Woman's Home and Foreign 
Missionary Society of the Suffolk Christian 
Church. 

We, the members of the society, offer the 
following resolutions : 

1. That in her death we have lost a faith- 
ful member whose smile was always an in- 
spiration to us. 

2. That we bow in humble submission to 
the divine will of our heavenly Father. 

3. That we extend our sympathy to the 
bereaved family. 

4. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family, a copy be entered on the 
records of our society, and a copy be sent 
to The Christian Sun for publication. 

Mrs. GEORGE E. ROGERS, 
Mrs. HARRY P. TAYLOR, 
Mrs. W. H YATES, 

Committee. 



BLYTHE. 

We, the members of Union (Southampton) 
Christian Church were saddened May 22, 
1948, by the passing of our beloved friend 
and member, Mrs. Nettie Joyner Blythe. 
She will be greatly missed by her many 
friends and neighbors and most of all in her 
home where she faithfullly served as a de- 
voted wife and mother. 

To pay tribute and desiring to express 
love and respect from our church, it is there- 
fore resolved: 

1. That we shall miss her in the sweet 
fellowship of our work together. We shall 
always cherish the memory of her friendship. 

2. That we are grateful for such a true 
friend and member, one who possessed a 
strong Christian character and lovable per- 
sonality. 

3. That we extend to her bereaved family 
our heartfelt sympathy and commend them 
to the Comforter whose grace is sufficient 
for every need. 



4. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to her family, one to Tho Christian Sun 
and one kept for the records of Union 
Christian Church. 

NELLIE SCOTT, 
Mrs. S. M. JOYNER, 

Committee. 



WARRINGTON. 

We, the members of First Congregational 
Christian Church, Norfolk, wish to pay 
tribute to the memory of our beloved deacon, 
William V. Warrington, with the following 
resolutions: 

1. That the church has lost an able officer 
and diligent worker. 

2. That the Barrett Bible Class has lost 
a capable teacher and friend. 

3. That we extend to his bereaved family 
our profound sympathy and pray God's 
watchful care may sustain them. 

4. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family, a copy be sent to The 
Christian Sun, and a copy spread on our 
church record. 

W. J. THOMAS, Chairman, 
Board of Deacons. 



BLYTHE. 

On December 29, 1947, our Heavenly Fa- 
ther, who doeth all things well, saw fit to 
call from our midst Miss Margaret Etta 
Blythe, who was a devoted member of Un- 
ion (Southampton) Christian Church. She 
was devoted to her family and to her home 
and was characterized by a kind and friend- 
ly personality. Therefore, be it resolved : 

1. That we bow in humble submission to 
our Father's will. 

2. That to the family and loved ones we 
extend deepest sympathy and earnest 
prayers that God's promises may give them 
comfort and consolation in their sorrow. 

3. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family and to The Christian Sun 
for publication, and another copy be placed 
on the records of Union Christian Church. 

NELLIE SCOTT, 
Mrs. S. M. JOYNER, 

Committee. 



BAILEY. 

We, the members of the Ladies' Aid So- 
ciety of the Windsor Christian Church, wish 
to pay loving tribute to the memory of our 
dear member and co-worker, Leafy Wills 
Bailey, who died on December 14, 1948. 

Therefore, be it resolved: 

1. That we bow in humble submission to 
God who doeth all things well. 

2. That while we miss her in the fellow- 
ship of our church, we will always cherish 
the memory of her fellowship and faithful 
service. 

3. That we extend our heartfelt sympathy 
to the members of her family, and pray 
God's blessings upon them. 

4. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family, a copy sent to The 
Christian Sun, and a copy be entered upon 
the records of our Ladies' Aid Society. 

Mrs. SHIRLEY T. HOLLAND, 
Mrs. J. C. ROBERTS, 

Committee. 



WILKERSON. 

Mrs. Roxie Ella Wilkerson, widow of the 
late Dave Y. Wilkerson, died at the South 
Boston (Va.) Hospital on December 30, 



1948. Funeral services were conducted at 
Union Congregational Christian Church, 
Virgilina, Va., by the pastor. Burial was 
in the town cemetery. She had been a mem- 
ber of the Christian Church over 35 years. 

She is survived by three sons, Walter W. 
Satterfield of South Boston, Va.; Ed. O. and 
C. F. Satterfield of Virgilina ; by 33 grand- 
children and a number of great-grandchil- 
dren. 

Mrs. Wilkerson was blind for a number 
of years and in ill health for a long period 
of time. Death released her from these 
maladies. 

May the Father God bless those who 
mourn. 

M. W. ANDES. 



THE TEACHER'S RESPONSIBILITY. 

No one but the school teacher is in 
so favorable a position to give the 
truthful story about alcohol. The job 
belongs to the men and women of the 
school classrooms, and when they have 
done what the laws of many States 
have specifically required of them, the 
most ingenious and specious of com- 
mercial advertising' will make but lit- 
tle impression on youth. 

The teaching about alcohol should 
give the facts upon which children can 
form their own opinions by "thinking 
through" the relation of their choices 
of food and drink to their health and 
way of life. 

It has been shown by a series of ex- 
perimental observations that young 
children, if having access to various 
wholesome foods known to contain 
suitable ingredients for their healthy 
growth, and if left to their own pref- 
erences, select and ingest the elements 
of a healthy diet. 

When faced, however, with other 
people's choices with the influence of 
tradition, social custom, the effects of 
advertising, economic pressure, stor- 
age of foods out of season, and lacking 
free access to a wide range of natural 
food products, the child of today — like 
its parents — finds the choice of what it 
can, or must use as food or beverage, 
an increasingly difficult problem. 

Those of us who are the trustees and 
interpreters of the assembled facts of 
our predecessors and of the sciences of 
today should make sure that no honest 
fact concerning any hazard and handi- 
cap to life, such as alcohol, is withheld 
or forgotten in the teaching of the 
school children. 

The effect sought and found from 
the use of alcoholic beverages of any 
strength is due to ethyl alcohol. Ethyl 
alcohol is a narcotic drug which re- 
moves inhibitions by depressing the 
functions of the brain. Its use has not 
been found to improve any of the 
bodily functions of a healthy person. 
— Dr. Haven Emerson. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 10, 1949. 



Message for Race Relations Sunday 
February 13, 1949 

Approved by the Executive Committee 
of the 

Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America 

"Be kindly affectioned one to another with brotherly love; in honor preferring 
one another." — Romans 12:10. 



Divine Love makes Christian brotherhood 
different from every other kind of human as- 
sociation. This love requires for every person 
justice and full opportunity because of his 
dignity and worth as God's creature and the 
object of His redemptive love. To profess to 
love God and to give offense to our brother 
because of racial difference is to sin. The love 
of God and the love of our fellowman go 
together. 

Christians, therefore, face the task of mak- 
ing love a reality in their own lives by the 
practice of brotherhood. There are persons, 
known and unknown, who in spite of diffi- 
culties live lives of real Christian brotherhood 
with those of other races. Some individuals, 
however, fear the loss of personal status and 
community influence which they assume the 
practice of Christian brotherhood in race rela- 
tions would bring. In practice they allow such 
fear to outweigh the belief that the brother- 
hood of love under the fatherhood of God is 
the highest goal of life. They do not apply 
Jesus' words: ". . . seek ye first the Kingdom 
of God . . ." 

The practice of Christian love calls for con- 
tinuous examination of human motive, for 
courageous and intelligent facing of worldly 
pressures fiom without and emotional pres- 
sures from within, for complete and daily ded- 
ication to Christ. 

The Christian Church can point to experi- 
ences within its own life which are examples 
of brotherhood. An impressive illustration of 
this was found in the Christian fellowship 
achieved by representatives of many races in 
the first Assembly of the World Council of 
Churches at Amsterdam, Holland, in the sum- 
mer of 1948. There is also a challenge in its 
statement: 

". . . the Church has failed most lament- 
ably, where it has reflected and, by its prac- 
tices, then sanctified the racial prejudice 
that is rampant in the world. And yet it is 
here today that its guidance concerning 
what God wills for it is especially clear. It 
knows that it must call society away from 



prejudices based upon race and color and 
from the practices of discrimination and 
segregation as denials of justice and human 
dignity, but it cannot say a convincing word 
to society unless it takes steps to eliminate 
these from the Christian community be- 
cause they contradict all that it believes 
about God's love for all His children." 
The churches must recognize in our own 
nation the unrighteousness of segregation and 
such racial injustices as denial of the right to 
vote; the actual inequality of the so-called "sep- 
arate but equal" opportunities in education, 
health, public services; racial discrimination in 
employment ; racial restrictions in housing, and 
sometimes the use of law and mob violence to 
enforce these practices. To their hopes and 
prayers for peace the churches must add evi- 
dence of Christian power to uproot seeds of 
racial conflict in the community. 

The warning is clear and grows swiftly 
clearer that judgment awaits us if we fail to 
practice love. In the words of John's Epistle: 
"He who hateth his brother . . . walketh in 
darkness and knoweth not whither he goeth." 
The failure to heed the warning has resulted 
in the sharp racial division of our own nation. 
It is essentially the cause for the fear and hatred 
that hover over all the nations of the earth. 

How can we Christians expect the nations 
to settle their problems on grounds of justice if 
we continue to withhold justice from brothers 
of another color? What can we say to the 
non-Christian peoples of the world ? How can 
our nation take effective leadership in develop- 
ing an international bill of rights if we do not 
live up to our own Bill of Rights? 

We must face this responsibility not only 
on Race Relations Sunday but every day. We 
must break away from every unchristian racial 
relationship now. Individually and in the fel- 
lowship of the Church, Christians must take 
the lead in correcting racial injustices and in 
strengthening the spirit of brotherhood. In the 
brotherhood that Christ has revealed as the 
will of God, there is healing for the nations 
and a solid foundation for lasting peace. 



1844 - Over a Centur^OTl!^ - 1949 

The CHRISTIAN SUN 

ORGAN OF THE SOUTHERN CONVENTION OF CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 
In Essentials, Unity — In Non-Essentials, Liberty — In All Things, Charity 

Volume CI. RICHMOND, VA., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1949. Number 7. 



WIN THEM BACK 

By REV. ROBERT A. WHITTEN, Chairman 
Committee on Evangelism and Spiritual Life of 
The Southern Convention 

What about those members of your church who seldom, if ever, 
come to church any more? Once they believed enough in the church 
to unite with its fellowship. Perhaps if you could persuade them to 
return they would become not only regular attendants but loyal workers 
in Kingdom service. Have you let them know your concern for them, 
your sorrow for their absence, your joy in the prospect of having them 
back in fellowship? Don't give them up. Think how God has kept 
on forgiving you, giving you another chance to love and serve Him. 
You and your church need these members who are temporarily out of 
circulation. What an example they are before the world, bearing wit- 
ness of the failure of the church to make them Christian! What an 
influence and help they might become, enlisted with you for Christ! 
Two Christians, fully consecrated to God, could win them (most of 
them at, least) back to the church, back into service for others, back into 
the peace they once knew, back into the joy of communion with God. 

Preparation for the Task. — Before we go to win them we need that 
preparation of mind and heart that can come only by feeding daily 
upon God's word and heart searching prayer. Reading the Bible daily 
will be the means of deepening one's spiritual life. From its pages God 
will speak and feed the soul with hidden manna. The little booklet, 
"Daily Devotions," is inexpensive and will prove helpful to any one 
who ponders its pages. As the physical body requires food so must the 
spiritual be sustained by daily meditation and prayer. Keep the altar 
burning until the Holy Spirit sets your heart aflame and sends you out 
to seek some soul for Christ's sake. 

Your God -Given Souls. — Among your friends are those who have 
not met Christ. It is your privilege to introduce them to your Saviour. 
Tell them what He has meant to you. Ask them to believe Him, to 
trust Him, to accept Him, to yield to Him. Tell them God is waiting 
for them only to claim His promise of salvation. You dare not fail to 
seek them. You will rejoice when you have won them. 



Page Two. 

I News Flashes 1 

The Mission Board of the Southern 
Convention is meeting on Thursday 
of this week at Henderson. Dr. F. C. 
Lester is president. 



Dr. Stanley U. North will preach 
at Bayview, Norfolk on Sunday eve- 
ning and will speak at the Eastern 
Virginia Ministers' Association in 
Suffolk on Monday. 

Mrs. M. T. Garren of First Church, 
Greensboro, was the speaker at the 
meeting of the Winston-Salem Coun- 
cil of Church Women on Wednesday, 
February 9. 

The Christian Sun salutes those 
churches that have erected new par- 
sonages recently. The list, although 
not complete, would include : Bur- 
lington, Shallow Ford, Winchester, 
and the Convention Home at Elon. 



Hank's Chapel Church, near Pitts- 
boro, Rev. Mack V. Welch, pastor, is 
experiencing a gain in membership 
in Sunday school attendance and the 
church attendance is increasing no- 
tably. 



LAYMEN'S LEAGUE. 

"The Men of the Church Club" of 
Haw River Congregational Christian 
Church, held their regular monthly 
dinner meeting January 22, 1949, in 
the basement of the church. Mr. 
Frank Bain's Sunday School Class 
served the men a most delicious din- 
ner. 

The speaker of the evening was 
Mrs. John Archie Long, Sr., a former 
Sunday school teacher of the Men's 
Class. Mrs. Long led a most interest- 
ing discussion on Biblical characters, 
including Christ, Moses and David. 
She also conducted a Biblical quiz. 

The Club elected the following of- 
ficers for the year: Lester James, 
president; E. D. Abemathy, vice- 
president, and Thomas Terrell, secre- 
tary and treasurer. 

The church is proud of the work 
"The Men of the Church Club" has 
done and is doing now. They sewed 
grass seed on the parsonage lawn, as- 
sisted in weather-stripping and 
screening the parsonage. They have 
donated both work and money toward 
the building of the parsonage garage 
which is now under construction. 

Mrs. J. C. Wilkins, 
Pub licity Chairman. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 

SEEING IS BELIEVING. 

[Extracts from address by Miss Helen 
Kenyon, Moderator of the General Coun- 
cil, at the Church Extension and Evange- 
lism Division Luncheon, Monday noon, 
February 7, in the Hotel Cleveland.] 

Fifty-six per cent of the population 
of our United States have changed 
their homes since 1940. In Silver 
Spring, a suburb of Washington, D. 
C, the population in the last four 
years has increased from 46,000 to 
80,000. Here a Silver Spring church 
is being built for a community of 
10,000 souls. We are on the job in 
Silver Spring. You must see the new 
film about this church : ' ' We would 
Be Building. ' ' • 

All over the country you find 
churches like that in these new com- 
munities. I've seen new churches 
overcrowded before they're finished. 
In California I saw a fine little 
church. The young minister said, 
"What are we going to do about the 
church school when it rains ? Half of 
those children are now meeting on 
this open lot ! ' ' Six months later when 
I returned I asked: "What are they 
doing? What did they do in the 
rain ? ' ' The answer, with a grin, was : 
' ' It hasn 't rained yet ! ' ' You remem- 
ber the drought! But now it has 
rained, and what are they doing? 
The law there does not permit church 
school classes in private homes. So 
they've liad to tell them to go ahead 
and build an addition to that church, 
though our Board of Home Missions' 
treasury is empty to help churches 
like that and so is the treasury of the 
Southern California Conference. 

I've been in Northern California 
at the Orinda Church, just outside the 
San Francisco Bay area. I thought I 
saw a carpenter as we approached. A 
man with a carpenter's cap and a car- 
penter's apron; and lo and behold, it 
was the minister ! ' ' What are you 
doing?" we said. "I am working on 
flooring for two tents we 've been able 
to get so that when it rains our church 
school will have a place to meet. 

A survey of an area near Seattle 
showed that 88 per cent of the people 
in that peninsula were not connected 
with any religious institution, whither 
Catholic, Protestant or Jewish'. . . . 
You can see why we say we have to 
put money in to start a church. We 
have to get the people to want a 
church. In the early times, a group 
of people started a church. But now 
they don't know that they need a 
church until Ave start one. 

But let me end up with Paradise 
Hills, out side of San Diego, because 
(Continued on page 11.) 



February 17, 1949. 

HISTORIC ORGAN COMPANY 
COMES TO SUFFOLK, VA. 

The first Standaart Organ was built 
in 1628 by Adrianus .Standaert van 
den Haspel in Cathedral of Dord- 
recht, Holland. The Standaart firm 
was incorporated in 1904 in Holland. 
In 1926 a second factory was opened 
in 'Antwerp, Belgium, a third one in 
1928 in Paris, France, and a fourth 
one in 1929 in Thornton Heath, near 
London, England. The Standaart Or- 
gan Company in Holland usually em- 
ploys about 120 people. 

In 1947 Dr. Adrian Standaart came 
to this country and started a factory 
at Fork Union, Virginia. Due to the 
very rapid increase of business the 
plant in Fork Union became too 
small and after long negotiations and 
not for a small part due to energetic 
cooperation of Mr. Richard Hinman, 
secretary of the Suffolk Chamber of 
Commerce, and of Mr. Leon A. Fami- 
lant, chairman of the Industrial Com- 
mittee of this Chamber,: the Standaajrt 
Organ Company obtained a suitable 
building and lots on East Pinner 
Street. 

The "Standaart" Organ is not 
mass produced, but every instrument 
is custom-built to suit the particular 
acoustical and other requirements of 
the building where it is to be in- 
stalled. 

The type of labor used to build a 
"Standaart" Organ is highly skilled. 
Cabinet makers, carpenters, electri- 
cians, sheet metal workers, organ me- 
chanics, pipe makers, tuners, voicers 
and office staff are employed. 

Lumber and materials used are of 
the highest quality. In contradiction 
with the customary working methods, 
the windchests of the "Standaart" 
Organ are constructed completely out 
of the highest grade mahogany, 
whereas the generous use of silver for 
electric contacts, the very specialized 
types of electrical relays and action 
enable the Standaart Organ Company 
to guarantee its instruments uncondi- 
tionally for a period of twenty (20) 
years. 

The President of the Standaart Or- 
gan Company has worked out a 
scheme to employ on a large scale dis- 
abled War Veterans ; in doing this the 
management trusts to do its share in 
solving* the employment problems for 
these people. 

The Company solicits applications 
for skilled labor in the above-men- 
tioned trades in care of Suffolk Cham- 
ber of Commerce, or Post Office Box 
696, Suffolk, Virginia. 



February 17, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Three. 



Southern Convention Office 



Rev. Wm. T. Scott, Superintendent 



ATTEND MIDWINTER MEETINGS. 

The following persons from the 
Southern Convention were in attend- 
ance at the General Council of the 
Congregational Christian Churches in 
Cleveland, Ohio, February 4-5 : Miss 
Pattie Lee Coghill, Rev. Roy D. Coul- 
ter, Dr. Jesse H. Dollar, Rev. W. Wal- 
ter Hall, Dr. Stanley C. Harrell, Rev. 
Robert Lee House, Rev. Clyde 0. 
Koon, Rev. J. Everette Neese, Mrs. 0. 
H. Paris, Mr. Clayton A. Pugh, Mr. 
Cyrus Shoffner, Rev. W. W. Stevens, 
Dr. William E. Wisseman, Rev. Rob- 
ert A. Whitten and Superintendent 
Wm. T. Scott. 

Mrs. 0. H. Paris, president of the 
Woman's Convention of the Southern 
Convention attended the meeting of 
the State Presidents of the Congrega- 
tional Christian Women. Stanley C. 
Harrell is a member of the Executive 
Committee of the General Council. 
Mrs. Wm. E. Wisseman is a member 
of the Board of Directors of the 
Board of Home Missions, and Super- 
intendent Scott attended the Super- 
intendent's Conference in connection 
with the Midwinter Meetings held in 
Cleveland following the Special Ses- 
sion of the General Council. 



LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE. 

The Leadership Training Confer- 
ence for the Norfolk-Portsmouth area 
was held at Rosemont Church Febru- 
ary 13-16. The attendance was good 
and the interest in church work was 
greatly improved as a result of this 
conference. The conference for the 
Suffolk area for Sunday school teach- 
ers and officers will be held at the 
Suffolk Christian Church February 
20-23. Faculty members serving on 
the faculty of these schools are : Dr. 
F. E. Reynolds and Dr. W. W. Sloan 
of the Elon College -Department of 
Religion; Rev. B. V. Munger, Chapel 
Hill; Miss Leila Anderson of the Di- 
vision of Christian Education of the 
Board of Home Missions. 



BIBLE INSTITUTES TO BE HELD. 

A series of Vacation Bible Insti- 
tutes will be held February 24-March 
3 for leaders in the Vacation Bible 
Schools for the coming summer : 
February 24 — Norfolk area, Second 

Church, Rev. J. E. Neese, minister. 
February 25 — Suffolk area. Suffolk 



Christian Church, Dr. John G. 
Truitt, minister. 

February 27 — Waverly - Wakefield 
area, Waverly Church, Rev. J. E. 
McCauley, minister. 

March 1 — Henderson area, Hender- 
son Church, Rev. J. F. Apple, min- 
ister. 

March 2 — -Greensboro Church, 
Greensboro area, Rev. W. E. Wisse- 
man, minister. 

March 3 — Asheboro, Asheboro 
Church, Dr. F. C. Lester, minister. 

These institutes will be held at 7 :30 
on the dates given and all leaders and 
prospective leaders are urged to at- 
tend. These institutes are being spon- 
sored by the Christian Education 
Board of the Southern Convention 
through its Children's Division head- 
ed by Mrs. Carey (W. J.) Andes, 
Chai rman, and leaders of the Conven- 
tion will be Miss Leila Anderson and 
Miss Pattie Lee Coghill and they will 
be ably assisted by the leaders of the 
women's work in the Convention. 



SEMINAR TO BE HELD AT 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

A Seminar for Ministers, Religious 
Education Directors, Social Workers, 
Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. Secretaries 
on Pastoral Counselling and Minis- 
tering to the Sick, under the auspices 
of the North Carolina Council of 
Churches, with Dr. Russell L. Dicks 
of Duke University as the Resource 
Leader, will be held on Monday, 
March 7, in the United Church of 
Raleigh, corner of Hillsboro and Daw- 
( Continued on page 14.) 



The Christian Sun 

Established 1844 by Rev. Daniel W. Kerr. 

A Religious Weekly for the Home, devoted 
to the interests of the Kingdom as represent- 
ed by the Congregational Christian Churches. 
Our Principles. 

J. The Lord Jesus Christ is the only 
Head of the Church. 

2. Christian is a sufficient name for the 
Church. 

3. The Bible is a sufficient rule of faith 
and practice. 

4. Christian character is a sufficient test 
of fellowship and Church membership. 

5. The right of private judgment and the 
liberty of conscience is a right and a privi- 
lege that should be accorded to and exer- 
cised by all. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor Eobert Lee House 

Managing Editor John T. Kernodle 

Associate Editors — J. B. Allen, H. G. Coun- 
cil Jr., J. H. Dollar, F. B. Eutsler, S. C. 
Harrell, R. M. Kimball, B. V. Munger, 
J. E. Neese, W. W. Sloan, H. S. Smith. 
Corresponding Editors — J. E. Apple (E. N. 
C), W. M. Stevens (N. C. & Va.), F. C. 
Lester (W. N. C), J- G. Truitt (E. Va.), 
R. A. Whitten (V. Va.). 
Departmental Editors— Wm. T. Seott, Con- 
vention; Mrs. W. J. Andes, Women's 
Work; Miss Elizabeth Chicoine, Young 
People's Work; Mrs. R. L. House, Chil- 
dren; L. E. Smith, Christian Education; 
Clias. D. Johnston, Orphanage; H. S. 
Hardcastle, Sunday School. 
Board of Publications— W. J. Andes, S. E. 
Madren, W. M. Stevens, W. E. Wisseman, 
T. F. Wright. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Six Months $1.00 

One Year $2.00 

Published by the Board of Publications, 
agent for the Southern Convention of Con- 
gregational Christian Churches, and printed 
every Thursday except the last in June and 
December by the Central Publishing Co., 
Inc., Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Post 
Office at Richmond, Va., July 25, 1922, un- 
der Act of March 3, 1879. 

Remittances for subscriptions should be sent 
to the Convention Office, Elon College, 
N. C. 

Ali other matters of business should be ad- 
dressed to The Christian Sun, 1536 East 
Broad Street, Richmond, 19, Va. 

Contributions should reach the editor at 
320li Grove Avenue, Richmond, 21, Va 



The Christian Sun Subscription Blank 

FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 
FIFTY ISSUES FOR $2.00 

Dr. Wm. T. Scott 
Elon College, N. C. 

Enclosed find $ for which pi ease send The Christian 

Sun for one year to 

Address 

Name 

I J New I J Renewal 



Page Four. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 17, 1949. 




*S MESSAGE 



Rationalize Our Divisions or Realize the Kingdom 




Numbers of people have expressed surprise and 
made inquiries concerning opposition to the Merger 
which manifested itself at Ceveland. It should be stated 
at the outset that members of the opposition have ren- 
dered a service by drawing attention to important points 
which otherwise might have been overlooked. They 
have insisted on a realistic appraisal of the Basis of 
Union. The Interpretations were drawn up and ap- 
proved to cover certain ambiquities and safeguard es- 
sential rights. Admittedly there are difficulties incident 
to this union. In all probability some have been over- 
emphasized while others have been overlooked. How- 
ever much we may be perplexed at certain points, we 
are not cast down. To admit that we are unequal to 
the exigencies of Christian union, however complicated 
or difficult, would be a sad commentary on twentieth 
century churchmanship. 

Much of the opposition could be summarized under 
the heading, "Ode to Freedom." The autonomy of the 
local church is defended at great length, as if it were 
the summum bonum of the Christian life. There is fear 
that this autonomy is jeopardized by the Basis of Union. 
Strange, is it not, that Christ had so little to say about 
freedom. On the contrary, we find him saying: "He 
that saveth his life shall lose it and he that loseth his 
life for my sake shall find it" — "Except a corn of wheat 
fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone." Undue 
emphasis on freedom may become an exceedingly sel- 
fish thing. Beneath the Cross the testimony of freedom 
concerning cooperation is ever this: "He must increase 
and I must decrease." Discipleship, rather than free- 



dom, is the pearl of great price. 

One speaker made the charge that many ministers 
present who favored union had members in their church 
who were not in favor of union. Granting the truth of 
this accusation, what does it prove? The same minis- 
ters in all probability have members who are not en- 
thusiastic about temperance, missions, stewardship and 
race relations. But that fact does not invalidate the 
Tightness of these causes. Since when has the ministry 
been supposed to take its cue from the attitude of the 
laity ? It has a higher Cue. 

Of course, the crux of the matter is this: some few 
claim that this Merger is not the will of God. They 
claim that the prayer recorded by St. John, "That they 
all may be one," has no reference or relationship to this 
union. Now it is one thing to admit that Jesus might 
not and probably was not thinking of our present de- 
nominational divisions, but it is quite a different thing 
to maintain that the prayer of Jesus has no relevance or 
application to our divided Protestantism. This is an 
arbitrary interpretation of the deepest supplication of our 
Lord. It limits the atoning work of our Savior. It 
places a premium on the Status Quo, and gives divine 
sanction to those who shirk in the face of a difficult 
task. Union, Christian union, must be more than unc- 
tious and irresponsible fellowship. It must bear the yoke 
of Christ. 

"Repent," said the Master, "the Kingdom of God is 
at hand." It is at hand, thank God, now. Let us repent, 
cease rationalizing our divisions, and enter the King- 
dom! 



Blue Book Digest 



The textbook for the Midwinter Meetings was a 
mimeographed copy bound in blue, bearing the title: 
"Dockets, Reports and Other Data in Preparation for 
the Congregational Christian Midwinter Meetings of 
The Missions Council, the Directors of the Board of 
Home Missions, the Prudential Committee of the Amer- 
ican Boards, and the Council for Social Action." A 
perusal of this Blue Book gives a glimpse of our denomi- 
national work on many fronts, demonstrates the calibre 
of our denominational leadership, and reveals something 
of the magnitude of our total enterprise. 

Since this document was prepared as a workbook 
and not for general circulation, perhaps it is advisable to 
lift a few significant items from its pages for your in- 
formation. For instance, some of the major donations 
of the Congregational Christian Service Committee have 
been: 1,200 gallons of cane treacle from the Alabama 
Council of Church Women for Great Britain; 3,000 



cases of grape juice to France; case of vitamins to Naples, 
Italy; boxes of candy, toys and school supplies for dis- 
tribution in Germany. Plans are now being made for 
a service and rehabilitation work camp project in Puerto 
Rico this summer. Rev. Anthony Caliandro is carrying 
on a family rehabilitation program in Naples. Rev. 
Harold Schomer is the missionary representative in 
France. Professor Harold C. Harlow, Jr., represents 
the Committee in and around Athens, Greece; while 
Miss Ruth Nichols administers the program of the Com- 
mittee in the area of Salonica in northern Greece. Four 
representatives are engaged in a strategic program of 
youth work in Germany. 

One example of the many services of the Board of 
Home Missions is the following given by Philip M. Wid- 
enhouse: "For some time the denomination has been 
concerned with the problem of churches 'marginal' in 
character but with signs of promise. A strong com- 



February 17, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Five. 



mittee consisting of two superinten- 
dents, Alden and Collins; two semi- 
nary men, Obenhaus and Woodward ; 
and two board representatives, Tripp 
and Widenhouse, are at work on this 
problem of helping the churches de- 
velop their full potential strength." 
Mr. "William K. Newman reports that 
the Christian World Mission Program 
provides 1318,000 toward the con- 



struction of new churches and $126,- 
886 for older churches during the 
year. 

The American Board outlines what 
you and I, our four hundred mission- 
aries and their 8,000 national co- 
workers can do to help save the world. 
Truly this is a great program — at 
home and abroad — to which we are 
unitedly committed ! 



What About China Today? 
A Statement from the American Board 



The American Board is not closing 
down its work, nor is it being closed 
out. Much — the Foochow and Shao- 
wu Missions — continues only indirect- 
ly affected by the upheavals in the 
North. Important service is being 
rendered by all our missionaries, 
whether still located where they were 
or transferred to quieter areas. Of 
the 41 missionaries in the North 
China Mission three months ago, 29 
decided to stand by. Only six left 
China. Two were on the edge of re- 
tirement, and three are now at work 
in the Philippines. The Foochow 
Mission has been strengthened by the 
transfer of two families from North 
China and the arrival of a new fam- 
ily from the United States. 

7s TMs Determination to Stand 

By Justified? 
Most certainly, on at least four 
counts : 

1. Chinese leaders requested it. — 
Mr. S. C. Leung said: "Purely as a 
Chinese I would speak emotionally. 
This is a civil war in China. All the 
trouble has been created by ourselves. 
We have no right to expect our for- 
eign friends to stay on and suffer with 
us. As a Christian, however, I must 
speak rationally. Whether from the 
standpoint of idealism or from the 
standpoint of realism it is better to 
have our foreign colleagues to remain 
with us wherever this is possible. 
Ideally speaking the church is inter- 
national in character and Avorld-wide 
in scope. Its object is to serve the 
people. So long as there are people to 
serve it is our duty to stay." 

2. Our own closest Chinese com- 
rades in the North re-enforced the re- 
quest. — What David Stowe wrote from 
Tientsin when he and Virginia made 
their decision to stay — barely three 
weeks before the birth of their second 
child — is eloquent : "Why should we 
shatter the solidarity and morale 
which which has been achieved 
through generations of missionary en- 
deavor since our arrival in Tientsin?" 



3. Our missionaries who have 
stayed on felt they could do no other- 
wise. — There has been not a word of 
criticism of those who for sound rea- 
sons accepted the offer of the Board 
that they withdraw. But Stowe spoke 
for all who decided to stay when he 
said, "We have been preaching 
faith, courage, the utter dependability 
of God, to people in America and in 
China now for years. Was it not time 
to try translating those great ideas 
from words into action ! If the 
church is to meet and overcome the 
world-wide challenge of Communism, 
somewhere it has to stop running and 
start digging in. This looks like a 
place to dig." Our faith and witness 
as well as theirs, is strengthened by 
words like that. 

4. Our experience in North Chima 
to date buttresses this position. Fen- 
yang (formerly called Fenchow) and 
Taiku were captured by the Commu- 
nists in July. They found four 
American women there : Mary De- 
war, Louise Meebold, Emma Noreen, 
and Gladys Williams. Word has 
seeped out under the curtain several 
times. It has been uniformly good. 

What of the Future? 
The prospects are not too bright. 
We know that the present liberality 
of treatment by the Communists is 
more likely to be tactical and tem- 
porary than evidence of change in 
fundamental policy. Yet their posi- 
tion in the country is shifting from 
that of rebels against the established 
order to that of rulers responsible for 
establishing a new order. They must, 
it would seem, begin to abandon prac- 
tices which have been largely de- 
structive, and begin to promote con- 
structive efforts of many kinds. They 
are undertaking an enormous task, 
even if their control stops at the 
Yangtze — which seems unlikely. They 
must now fulfill at least a few of the 
promises they have made. They will 
need all the help they can get, and if 
wise they will antagonize as few as 



possible of those who might help the 
people. Our schools, hospitals and 
rural reconstruction programs are too 
highly prized by the people to be wan- 
tonly destroyed. 

Yet it requires faith almost to the 
point of credulity to believe that any- 
thing less than hard times are ahead 
for the Church in China. Such times 
began in North China for Lintsing 
and Tehsien in Shantung three years 
ago, and for Taiku and Fenyang last 
July ; they are beginning right now 
for Tientsin, Paoting, Peiping and 
Tungchow. We have no assurance 
that trouble does not await the Foo- 
chow and Shaowu Missions. The es- 
sential loyalty of Chinese Communist 
leaders to Moscow is a matter of rec- 
ord, oft reaffirmed over the years and 
recently reiterated in print, and over 
the radio. 

Life will be hard for our work and 
our workers, for our missionary 
friends and our Chinese colleagues. 
Living conditions will be austere be- 
yond anything our people have 
known. There will be long periods 
when communications with us will be 
slow, difficult, and perhaps impossi- 
ble. There may be interdicts against 
foreign subsidies even for the strictly 
humanitarian parts of our program. 
There may be gradual but steady 
tightening of the screws — anti-relig- 
ious and anti-foreign agitation, and 
repudiation of some of what we re- 
gard as the essential freedoms of life. 

The Past Three Years Have 
Been Invaluable. 

During this breathing space, be- 
tween two struggles for survival, Chi- 
nese Christians have renewed their 
strength for whatever may lie ahead. 
They have received convincing evi- 
dence that Christians in this country 
— in a profound sense the spiritual 
parents of their churches, and under 
God the source of much of their re- 
ligious nurture — have cared for them, 
do care for them, and will continue to 
care for them. 

Who can estimate what it has meant 
that: 

Much property has been repaired 
and restored to active and continual 
use. 

Relief of many kinds has been made 
available to meet desperate human 
needs. 

Refresher courses have been possi- 
ble for some of the more experienced 
pastors and teachers. 

A select few have even had the 
chance for a year of study and re- 
freshment in America. 

(Continued on page 13.) 



Page Six. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 17, 1949. 



contributions! 



SUFFOLK LETTER. 

It was only $3.81. But when you 
consider the circumstances it seems 
like a goodly sum. The young moth- 
er who handed it over to me told me 
that she wanted me to take it for the 
Lord. "It is the Lord's money," she 
said. She was sick, poor, had two 
small children, and her husband made 
only a small wage. I brought it to the 
church, put it in an envelope and 
sealed it up, and labelled it "The 
Lord's money." 

Seeing the surroundings I didn't 
want to take it. But I had no choice 
in the matter, when she told me that 
it was a tithe from her egg money. 
"The hens have laid right well," she 
said, "and there has been enough to 
eat and some to sell, and I have strict- 
ly kept the tenth for the Lord. ' ' 

She is in the hospital tonight. I 
hope she lives because the little two- 
year-old son of hers, and that little 
four-year-old girl, will have a good 
mother if she lives. Her little tiny 
home was clean and although there 
had been adversity she believed in 
God, and the Church. She had faith 
in prayer, or rather, I should be using 
the present tense, because she is still 
living. She is kind to her husband. 
He told me so himself, although some- 
times he fails her. She will make a 
good man out of him if she lives, and 
there will be better days ahead. 

It was a real blessing to me to hear 
her talk. And it meant something to 
see the gratitude in her face as she 
thanked me for the prayer which I 
offered in her behalf. Funny how 
one often feels one should be praying 
for oneself in a place like that. Per- 
haps it was the prayer that I prayed 
for myself which the Lord heard. I 
said if the Lord spares me to go into 
my pulpit again I shall speak out for 
Him. 

And what is more I shall try to be 
a better steward, and not feel that 
what I give is too much, but only try 
to give more, and serve Him better. 
There are those who could really do 
things Avith a tithe. Their tithe would 
mean so much. Hers was only $3.81. 
Who knows, maybe the Lord will use 
it yet to cause someone else to consid- 
er his stewardship, and do a bit bet- 
ter for God. At any rate her tithe has 
caused me to take an interest in her 
husband, and the two little children, 
and it may all turn out that God will 



multiply her tithe and in His own 
good time repay her manifold in the 
grace He shows toward her family. 

Perhaps I shall add 19c to it and 
send it to CARE for one of those 
twenty - eight - different - kinds -of - seed 
packages for some poor family in Eu- 
rope where her name would fit right 
in — Spenyovics. The name sounds 
awfully strange to me, but maybe our 
kind heavenly Father knows other 
people by that name and maybe it 
doesn't sound at all strange to him. 

John G. Truitt, 



CHRISTIANITY FACES COM- 
MUNISM. 

[A talk by Miss Alice C. Reed, just 
back from Peiping, N orth China, Congre- 
gational Christian Educational missionary, 
before the Missions Council of Congrega- 
tional Christian Churches in Cleveland.] 

On February 1 the last of the seven 
stations of the North China Mission 
of the American Board of Foreign 
Missions, Congregational, passed into 
the hands of the Communists. The 
long months during which the ' ' creep- 
ing terror" drew closer and closer, 
and the hordes of refugees crowded 
into temples living a miserable ex- 
istence grew greater and greater, have 
come to an end. 

During the nearly three years since 
I returned to Peiping following a 
year and a half teaching in refugee 
schools in West China, people con- 
tinued to hope for the defeat of the 
Communists. The disillusionment was 
great when following the defeat of 
Japan the Chinese learned that in- 
stead of the peace for which they 
hoped they were in the midst of a 
civil Avar. 

As one of our Chinese Christian 
leaders said, "This has destroyed the 
sympathy many peopel felt toward 
the Communists." As far as I was 
able to find out from careful ques- 
tioning, not more than a tenth of the 
comon people have been pleased Avhen 
their homes passed into the control of 
the Communists. One of our thought- 
ful pastors remarked tAvo months aft- 
er his city changed hands, "People 
dislike them so much that they don't 
eA'en like the good things they do." 

Only a trickle of students have 
gone to Communist territory while 
thousands of the common people have 
fled at the approach of the Commu- 
nist armies or escaped after their 



homes were taken. North China has 
not gone Communist because the com- 
mon man has been converted to Com- 
munism but because the National 
Government was weak and ineffective 
Avhile the Communists had a highly 
efficient organization both in its army 
and in its propaganda department. 
They knew what they wanted and 
have gone ahead ruthlessly to gain 
their end willing to sacrifice not only 
their own comfort but the lives of any 
number of the common people. 

Some things in their program ap- 
peal strongly to the idealism of youth 
and seem not too different from our 
Christian teaching. Mr. G, Avhom I 
first knew as a teacher at Techow 30 
years ago, told me last summer, 
"When the Communists first came to 
our village and told what they were 
going to do I thought 'This sounds 
good ; it sounds like the things the 
church teaches.' " But, he added sad- 
ly, "When they began to put their 
theories into practice it was a differ- 
ent matter." Some things in their 
program appeal only to the loAvest ele- 
ments of society. 

I have been asked why I am op- 
posed to Communism. My answer has 
three parts: (a) Communists in China 
have encouraged personal vengeance 
— one of the things human society has 
been struggling to overcome for thou- 
sands of years, (b) They believe that 
the end justifies the means and use 
any means however cruel to gain their 
end. (c) Theirs is a totalitarian sys- 
tem where the common man has no 
value or importance except as he is of 
benefit to the system. 

The Communists knoAv Avhat they 
want. They have a plan. Students 
Avho take their course in propaganda 
are taught that Christianity is their 
last but greatest enemy. But in the 
meantime Christianity is being given 
a further chance. Our two mission 
stations in ,Shansi fell to the Commu- 
nists the eleventh day of last July. 
Our missionaries had planned to leave 
fearing that it Avould be impossible to 
carry on any work. But the rapid 
advance of the Communists cut off 
their chanqe to escape, and Ave in Peip- 
ing waited anxiously for Avord. This 
came before long and at intervals 
more Avord has come. The Commu- 
nists immediately posted notices that 
the missionaries and mission property 
Avere not to be disturbed. Schools, 
hospitals and churches were alloAved 
to carry on though the textbooks in 
the schools had to be approA^ed by the 
Communists. This Avas all in great 
contrast to the situation in Shantung, 
(Continued on page 11.) 



Page Seven. 



News of Elon College 



By President L. E. Smith 



important, and ultimately disappear 
from the field of higher education. 



INTRODUCTION TO PRESIDENT 
SMITH'S REPORT TO BOARD 
OF TRUSTEES. 

Freedom of mind, of action, and of 
purpose are essential to the normal 
development of human personality. 
Freedom in the processes of educa- 
tion, the selection of faculty, the 
building of the curriculum, and class- 
room procedures, is necessary for 
broad, accurate information, and the 
effective training of the individual. 
The individual is the product of his 
training, whether that training be in 
the home, classroom, office, shop, field 
or factory. His training must bear 
the mark of freedom if he is to bear 
the fruitage of freedom in present- 
day society. 

In America, we have been accus- 
tomed to freedom in its truest sense — 
freedom of speech, freedom of expres- 
sion, freedom of enterprise — freedom 
within the law. Only in recent years 
have Ave felt the hand of restraint, 
This restraint has been necessary be- 
cause of unusual disturbances occa- 
sioned by the Avar. Noav that the Avar 
is over, the cause of freedom is fresh 
on our minds and we grow impatient 
under restraints and are asking for 
a return to the privilege of freedom 
purchased by our forefathers at great 
cost. We must preserve our freedom. 
We owe as much to posterity. 

Freedom in education is the key to 
freedom in society. (Free schools and 
free colleges are essential to the con- 
tinuance of free education.) Free- 
dom from political restraints is nec- 
essary if our schools and colleges are 
to continue as free institutions. In 
America Ave have a dual system of 
education — a system of tax- or state- 
supported schools and colleges and a 
system of privately endoAved and 
church related schools and colleges. 
Under our present systems neither 
system will brook any outside inter- 
ference or domination of any kind. 
Each school must remain free to do its 
own job. All is good and Avell so long 
as freedom in cultural centers is tol- 
erated. Non-cultural forces, hoAvever, 
are becoming impatient, They would 
find their way into our systems of 
education and have something to do 
with their support and something to 
say as to their conduct. Flattered 



with the idea of financial aid we close 
our eyes to the evils of control. When 
once political intrigue puts its hand 
of control on our system of education, 
it will be next to impossible to break 
such a control. 

In America at this critical moment 
Ave should refresh our minds as to the 
history of education and of education- 
al institutions outside of this country. 
It is possible, at times, I am sure to 
leam valuable lessons from what has 
happened to other people and coun- 
tries. One hundred to one hundred 
and twenty years ago, Germany, 
France and Italy had a dual system 
of education comparable to Avhat we 
have in this country — state supported 
and privately endowed church-related 
schools and colleges. The state began 
to increase its support and to tighten 
its control accordingly. The private 
schools closed and disappeared. In 
the case of Germany, the state seized 
complete control of its system of ed- 
ucation and the state said where the 
schools should be, Avhat should be 
taught, Avho should teach, and Avho 
should be taught. We do not need to 
be told the results. They are painful- 
ly evident, 

In our country we are scenting the 
trail of education in European coun- 
tries and are beginnig to folloAV in 
their footsteps — federal aid to educa- 
tion. Federal control, limited or un- 
limited, will folloAV. Ultimately un- 
scrupulous politicians Avill have some- 
thing to say about this whole business 
of education. This Avould be tragic. 
The only way to prevent such condi- 
tions is to retain our privately en- 
dowed and church-related schools and 
colleges. The only way to retain them 
is to make them stronger, financially 
and otherwise. The only way to make 
them stronger is to substantially in- 
crease our financial contributions to 
them. It should not be necessary to 
remind ourselves that state appropri- 
ations to our tax-supported schools 
have trebled and quadrupled in the 
past ten years but that our support to 
our school, Elon College, has,remained 
about the same. As a Board of Trus- 
tees, a church, and alumni, we now 
face a serious alternative to sub- 
stantially increase the financial sup- 
port of our college or prepare our- 
selves to watch it grow weaker, less 



APPORTIONMENT GIVING. 

Contributions from our churches 
and Sunday schools for the college 
have been coming in very well. In 
comparing amounts received a year 
ago as of this date it is found that we 
are approximately one-third behind 
that of 1948. Weather conditions in 
1948 Avere extremely unfavorable for 
church attendance in rural sections. 
This year un paved roads have been 
difficult for traveling, otherwise, the 
Aveather has been quite faA^orable. 
Even though weather conditions have 
been more favorable, contributions 
from Sunday schools and churches 
have not been as large. It is hoped 
that this is not prophetic for the en- 
tire year. The college has its com- 
mitments and extensive financial de- 
mands are being made every week. If 
Ave are to keep the college in favorable 
financial condition, our churches, Sun- 
day schools and friends must be con- 
siderate and. generous. Amounts re- 
ceived from the students for tuition 
and fees are not sufficient to meet the 
current financial demands. 

In this particular, Elon College is 
not alone. All schools must receive 
outside support if they are to contin- 
ue their program and remain out of 
the red. In the light of existing con- 
ditions and the current needs of the 
college Ave are trusting that our 
churches and Sunday schools will be 
punctual in meeting their apportion- 
ments for the college. The college is 
always grateful for any cooperation 
and help given. 

Churches. 

Previously reported $ 685.76 

Eastern Va. Conference: 
Bosemont 75.00 

N. O. & Va. Conference : 

Ingram S. S 16.22 

Liberty 8. 8 18.40 

Western N. C. Conference : 

Ether 6.06 

Pleasant Eidge 65.00 

Va. Valley Conference: 

Mt. Lebanon S. 8 15.00 

Wincehster 25.00 

Total $ 220.68 

Grand total $ 906.44 



A Wurlitzer organ has been in- 
stalled in our Lynchburg Church and 
was used in the service of Avorship 
last Sunday for the first time. Rev. 
James B. Allen, pastor, is serving this 
year as vice-president and program 
chairman of the Lynchburg Minis- 
ters' Association. 



Page Eight. THE CHRISTIAN SUN 




SHAOWU LETTERS. 

The hospital carries on just about 
as usual. Out of our twenty-five beds 
we keep fifteen busy. Most of the 
cases at present seem to be malaria, 
typhoid, and amoebic dysentery. The 
out-patient clinic sees twenty to thir- 
ty patients a day. Like every other 
hospital in China we are having a 
terrible time keeping our noses out 
of the water. With this terrible in- 
flation, our American currency has 
suddenly become worthless. Also our 
American backing has dropped con- 
siderably. The local fees don't bring 
in enough to buy medicines for the 
hospital work. This month we had 
just enough money to pay the serv- 
ants' salaries. As yet the Christian 
doctors and nurses have had no pay. 
In this sort of situation, it makes 
free care almost impossible. 

This month we opened a free Well 
Baby Clinic at East Cate, after strug- 
gling with carpenters and repair men 
for over a month. This time it was 
Ed that went through all the battles 
trying to get the work done. One of 
the church ladies is donating free time 
to help keep the big Chinese stoves 
running and help with the actual 
washing of the babies. We run these 
baby baths along with the weighing 
and measuring of the children be- 
cause the mothers' homes are so cold 
that the kids go all winter unwashed 
unless we provide a place. They 
bring clean clothes and we pro- 
vide a warm place, soap and warm 
water. The soap, towels, powder and 
even money for fuel has been given 
by American churches. It does one 
good to see this united work of Amer- 
ica and China. Mrs. Lee will do the 
washing because children at an early 
age learn to be afraid of this white 
face of mine. They let me weigh and 
measure them with great howling and 
kicking on the babies' part. You can 
imagine how scared the baby would 
be if a white monster took his clothes 
away and started to wash him. So it 
pays for me to stay away and act as 
big boss. The kids are so cute, I sure- 
ly hate my role. 

This clinic is also being used by the 
Chinese doctors in our hospital to be- 



gin work for the blind. All kinds of 
eye diseases will be brought to the 
clinic. The money for this work was 
donated by an American woman. 

Another use for the clinic will be 
to take care of the school nursing of 
Han Mei (our church school) which is 
very close. So you see Ed's efforts 
were not in vain. 

Frances Riggs. 

The immediate future looks dark 
here as it does all over China. As a 
matter of fact, our troubles are mere- 
ly a reflection of the afflictions the 
whole country is passing through. We 
are hundreds of miles from the Civil 
War and the Communist danger, and 
the local population is not faced with 
famine because of crop failure or de- 
spoiling armies. But the inflation, 
which I reported in my last letter as 
having apparently been licked by the 
issuance of new currency, went wild 
again ; and whenever that happens, of 
course, everyone suffers except for a 
few speculators, but most of all those 
on fixed cash incomes such as em- 
ployees of institutions like ours. And 
unfortunately, as with China as a 
whole, there is a deplorable tendency 
here to blame America for the hos- 
pital 's plight, the boys saying that all 
their difficulties arise from the fact 
that we didn't come through with 
enough money in time. 

However, like the rest of China, the 
people here show that baffling but 
admirable trait of not knowing how 
to get completely discouraged and 
give up. They have no clear idea of 
how they are going to hang on, and 
their efficiency and standards may be 
down to zero, and they may simply 
muddle along and hope, without basis, 
for some sort of lucky break just 
ahead. But at least they never com- 
pletely surrender and stop trying, 
either in the war or adversity, like so 
many other nations and groups all 
over the world. They have done a lot 
of muddling through the past, but at 
least China has a 4,000-year history 
of unbroken existence just because of 
this quality. Recently I have been 
digging up my yard to plant a vege- 
table garden, and noticed that every- 



February 17, 1949. 

where I dug I struck old fragments 
of brick, tile and pottery. Dick Jack- 
son, excavating a six-foot hole in his 
yard to put in a septic tank, found the 
same sort of rubble all the way to 
the bottom. We were then told that 
it is the same all over Shaowu, at least 
within the city walls ; the whole pres- 
ent city is literally built on the rubble 
of Shaowu 's of the past, which have 
been razed, or gone to decay, time 
after time, as China's perpetual wars 
and famines and other disturbances 
rolled around ; and yet Shaowu has 
always been a living city. You can 
see the heritage of the past in the 
habits of the common people, their 
apparent selfishness and miserliness 
coming from their age-old intense 
struggle for. survival, but also their 
patient and uncomplaining acceptance 
of adversity, and their cheerful plod- 
ding along at their tasks, no matter 
what the prospects for the future. I 
notice also that when things get 
tough, the people here do not go in- 
sane or commit suicide or have ner- 
vous breakdowns or get high blood 
pressure or heart attacks or stomach 
ulcers or any of the other diseases 
that plague us when the strain of liv- 
ing becomes too great for us. It is a 
reaction to adversity that bears study, 
and the good features of which we 
would do well to preserve. It is easy 
for us greenhorns here to get dis- 
couraged when the outlook for the fu- 
ture seems so dim, but I think I can 
understand a bit of the spirit of our 
colleagues in North China, most of 
whom have turned down the Consul- 
General's recommendation to leave" 
the country, saying that they prefer 
to stick it out, along with their Chi- 
nese friends and their work, and see 
what develops. 

Of course when we elect to stick it 
out here we are not really sharing the 
experiences of our Chinese fellow- 
workers in the true sense of the word. 
The salary of any one of us foreigners 
would be enough to support the en- 
tire hospital staff, and we can depend 
on it through the days ahead, unless 
the foreign exchange rate fails us, or 
some disturbance makes it impossible 
for funds to be transmitted here from 
the coast. We have an adequate, even 
luxurious, diet, an iron stove in our 
house to take away the winter chill, 
and all the clothes we need. And if 
worst comes to worst we have the 
security of knowing that we are un- 
der the protection' of a strong and 
permanent government — we don't 
really know what it means to be on 
the losing side, the way Japan and 
(Continued on page 13.) 



February 17, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Church Women at Work 

With Emphasis on Missions 

Mrs. W. J. Andes, Editor 
637 IS. Sunset Drive, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



NEWS FROM LOCAL SOCIETIES. 
BURLINGTON. 

In the January 20 issue of The 
Christian Sun mention was made of 
a news bulletin published each month 
by the Burlington Auiliary. Mrs. W. 
W. Sellars is the editor of the bulletin 
and it is called "This and That." 
Since it does tell something of our 
work, let us take a peep at the back 
issues and do a, little reviewing. 

From the September issue we find 
mention of the beautiful installation 
service prepared by Mrs. Russell 
Clem. The theme was "The Beauty 
of Holiness. ' ' As each officer was in- 
stalled, a lovely nosegay was presented 
her. Holding this thing of beauty in 
her hand, she made her pledge of ded- 
ication. 

October found us listening with 
much interest to Mrs. AV. T. Scott as 
she presented the literature for the 
year. With much enthusiasm each 
circle took up the study of the selected 
material. Attractive year books were 
made and presented to each circle 
member by Mrs. W. W. Sellars, pro- 
gram chairman. 

In November the Auxiliary had as 
their guest Mrs. Henry C. Sprinkle of 
Greensboro, who had just returned 
from a trip to Europe. She with her 
husband attended the Amsterdam 
Conference of the World Council of 
Churches. She spoke of the suffering 
and great need now existing in Eu- 
rope and urged our aid. It was with 
thankful hearts that we who had so 
much could give an offering through 
our Committee for War Victims and 
Reconstruction for this very thing. 
This month the Auxiliary also shared 
with other city churches in the ob- 
servance of AVorld Community Day 
and the "Pack a Towel for the Teen 
Ager" project. 

As we turn our pages to December 
we remember again the very beauti- 
ful Christmas program held in the 
church auditorium. A devotional on 
the Birth of Jesus, Christmas Carols, 
and special Christmas music by Mrs. 
J. R. Kernodle and Mrs. R. W. Bran- 
nock including "He shall Peed His 
Flock" from Handel's Messiah, made 
us realize that "The Lord is in His 
Holy Temple." The circles this month 
took needy families for their ' ' Friend- 



ly Service." Plans also were made 
to assist in furnishing the Annex for 
the young people. 

Now here we are at January. We 
see the name of Miss Pattie Lee Cog- 
bill, and recall what a wonderful time 
we had listening to Pattie review Twi- 
light or Dawn. Pattie puts China in 
your hearts. Since the January meet- 
ing the Auxiliary has supervised a 
"spring cleaning" of the church. 

The Auxiliary studies The Gospel 
Unlimited under the leadership of our 
pastor, Rev. W. Millard Stevens. This 
study is an important part of our 
spiritual growth. 

AVe have not reached February in 
our "This and That," but its pages 
will hold much that will be of inter- 
est. More and more we would pro- 
mote missions in our church, especial- 
ly among our young people. To bring 
before them the need of missions 
would place in their hearts the seed 
that eventually bring forth the har- 
vest. 

May the blessings of God rest upon 
each Auxiliary and the work which is 
being done. 

Mrs. M. Z. Rhodes, 

President. 

WINCHESTER. 

The AVinchester women are very 
happy in their missionary society and 
its work. As soon as we secured the 
Plan Book, our president met with 
her committee and appointed leaders 
for the year. It has been good to see 
how the women planned their pro- 
grams and how interestingly they 
were presented. We have asked our 
pastor to present the study in Gala- 
tians at the Wednesday evening serv- 
ices and are looking forward to these 
studies in the near future. It is 
planned to have our study books re- 
viewed at a covered dish supper to 
which we will invite any who will 
share with us. There will be two sup- 
pers — one perhaps in February and 
one in April. One book will be given 
by Mrs. Orville Hoover and one by 
Mrs. Whitten. 

Our Society raises its finances by 
dues, and once a quarter, a special 
free-will offering is received. At each 
meeting the plate is passed to receive 
the money with which we buy Life 



Page Nine. 

Membership and Memorial certifi- 
cates. We have averaged two a year 
for the past few years, I think. We 
have heretofore joined with others in 
sending clothing overseas. In fact, 
three of our women have established 
very sweet friendships with families 
in Germany, exchanged pictures, sent 
food, c 1 o t h i n g, Christmas gifts 
wrapped as to a very close friend. 
The letters of gratitude that have 
come have been shared with the so- 
ciety and we have certainly enjoyed 
them. Our world seems larger for the 
experience. 

This year, as just a small Friendly 
Service gesture, we mailed a little 
remembrance to Timothy Chang and 
another to Martha Huber, the daugh- 
ter of missionary friends in Africa. 
Martha is in Florida, studying now, 
having recently left her parents in 
Africa to come to this country. As 
a new Friendly Service project it is 
planned that each woman will bring 
to next month's meeting, some little 
garment which she herself has made, 
or some contribution for little layettes 
for Indian babies, tp be sent to Rev. 
Harold Case, to be used in his work 
with the Indians in North Dakota. 

It was decided this year, that in- 
stead of sending clothing overseas, Ave 
would hold a "Rummage Sale" here 
at home, selling clothing in very good 
condition at very low prices. AVe se- 
cured a store on the main street of 
the town on Friday, which was the 
only day available. The rain poured, 
but we decided they were "showers 
of blessing" for our sale brought $88. 
There were several articles we thought 
would sell better at a later time than 
at a rummage sale, such as a lovely 
crocheted center piece, crocheted bed 
room slippers, a hanky with tatting 
around it, and even a white fruit 
cake, baked the day of our meeting. 
These were sold at auction at the De- 
cember meeting. Of course, last year 
we had the "Unseen Guest" program, 
so we had to find another plan this 
year. Mrs. Clayton Pugh was chair- 
man of the committee on arrange- 
ments for a supper meeting. She and 
her committee did a grand job and 
the meeting was largely attended. 

At first, in order that our people 
might appreciate how their friends 
across the seas had suffered, we had 
a "soup line," serving only crack- 
ers and potato soup. There was a 
program on "War Victims" and how 
we might help. An offering was tak- 
en, amounting to $53.12. Then fol- 
lowed a. real fellowship supper, Avhen 
the committee served good old creamed 
(Continued on page 14.) 



Page Ten. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 17, 1949. 



FOR THE CHILDREN 

Mrs. R. L. House, Editor 



Dear Boys and Girls : 

Do you like parades? Richmond 
had a wonderful one last Monday 
(February 7) when the French Merci 
Train arrived. It was a wonderful 
occasion. Last winter the people 
of America sent boxcars filled with 
food and grain to the people of 
France, especially the children, and 
the Merci Train was their thank you. 
Merci means thanks in French. 

There were cars for several states. 
One of them went to North Carolina. 
It was taken to Raleigh from Rich- 
mond. So the boys and girls of both 
states can be happy over this remem- 
brance. A lady in Paris, the Countess 
de Fels, thought of doing this and the 
school children and their parents 
brought all kinds of gifts to the train. 
When they were unpacked there were 
handmade handkerchiefs, a n t i q u e 
fans, dolls, doll clothes, vases, a wed- 
ding gown, a coach (like Cinderella's) 
and many other beautiful gifts. 

The parade began when the Gov- 
ernor of Virginia's aide met the peo- 
ple at the train and began taking the 
box car to the State Capital. Thou- 
sands of school children stood on 
Broad Street to see the little gray box 
car with its medallions on the side. 
Shaped like shields these medallions, 
bore the seals (or signs) of the prov- 
ince from which they came. So warm 
was the feeling for the people who 
sent the gifts that many people cried. 
There was a girl dressed like the 
French girl, Joan of Arc, riding a big 
white horse. The Richmond Light 
Infantry Blues were in the parade, 
too. This is a very military group 
and they are famous for their uni- 
forms and precision in marching. Just 
a few weeks before they were in the 
inaugural parade for the President. 
Their blue dress uniforms are very 
wonderful and one really hasn't seen 
a parade until one has seen the 
"Blues" as they are called. 

After the parade was over, the gifts 
were unpacked and placed on display. 
Thousands of people have gone to see 
the lovely things. There were notes 
pinned to the gifts. Some of them 
said, "Thank you for the milk and 
bread. Here is my best loved doll." 
It makes me a little sad to think they 
sent us so much when we have so 
much food and sent them so little. 

I am glad that we live in America 
where we can have parades and gath- 



er in the streets together without be- 
ing afraid. It is good that we have 
enough to eat, too. I hope you will 
be seeing a parade soon. 

Are some of you sick? So many 
boys and girls have the measles or 
chicken pox now. Sunday schools 
and schools have rooms empty because 
of it. I heard of one class of twenty- 
five with four present last Sunday. 
Special greetings to two little boys, 
away from home and sick with the 
measles. Hello and get well soon 
to Tommy and Jonathan ! I hope all 
of you will soon be well and back at 
school and play ! 



THE CHILD WHO GIVES. 

By Helen Gregg Green. 

Issued by the National Kindergarten 
Association. 

"Does Aunt Loretha smoke, Mom- 
mie?" five-year-old Bobby asked, as 
he cut out and pasted pictures in the 
scrapbook he was making for a Christ- 
mas gift. Then, answering his own 
questions, he said, "I know she does, 
Mommie ; I saw her smoking one day. 
So I'll paste a pipe in her book." 

When relating this amusing inci- 
dent, Bobby's mother told us that she 
had encouraged Bobby to make, or to 
buy at the ten-cent store, gifts for his 
near relatives and many of his 
friends. 

Little children should not only re- 
ceive remembrances at Christmas 
time ; they should also be helped to 
enter into the spirit of giving them. 

An intimate talk about the different 
members of the family and close 
friends — the activities in which they 
like to engage and the kind of things 
they like to have near them or to use 
— is a good introduction to the child 's 
consideration of what to give. It is 
wise to be as helpfully suggestive 
along these lines as the parent can, 
but when it comes time for the child 
to choose a gift, only such assistance 
should be offered as is quite certain 
the child desires — no more. 

A friend of mine was worried be- 
cause her small daughter seemed to 
be growing selfish. "I'm going to 
start preparing inexpensive presents 
for Vicki to give to her father and me 
and to her playmates," she said. "I 
shall help her to wrap up all of them, 
except the one for me ; her father will 
help her with that one. So far she 



has been the recipient of most of the 
gaily-tied boxes. She needs to learn 
the joy of preparing them for others. 
When she is older I shall teach her to 
make simple gifts. ' ' 

When boys and girls do make the 
gifts that they give away, the whole 
procedure should be treated with the 
seriousness and interest that all chil- 
dren's plans deserve. 

I have never forgotten a gift that I 
made for my father when I was seven. 
It was a beribboned whisk - broom 
holder — for his dignified law office. 

"Now, Mother," I remember say- 
ing, ' ' this is to be a real surprise ! 
Don't tell Daddy about it!" 

One day, however, a slight suspicion 
having been aroused, I asked, Mother, 
you didn't tell Daddy about his sur- 
prise did you?" 

Being ever-truthful, Mother admit- 
ted she had told him. I was over- 
whelmed with disappointment. All 
the joy in the gift vanished. 

It is often difficult for parents to 
understand and appreciate the grow- 
ing child's emotional reactions. For 
this reason adults frequently cause 
hurts and deep disappointments over 
things which to them seem trivial but 
which to the child are of tremendous 
import. 

So, Mother, or Dad, when a present 
is made or has been bought, and you 
are taken into the secret and told it is 
to be a great and important surprise, 
do remember it is important, for your 
child may be testing the satisfaction 
that comes from carefully considered 
giving. Even if poor judgment has 
been shown, be sure that the child 
awakens to this only gradually and 
naturally and that in the meantime he 
experiences the full joy his unselfish 
effort deserves. 

MARRIED 

SHOEMAKER-SHOWALTER. 

A wedding of interest to their many 
friends was solemnized at the parsonage of 
the Winchester Church by the pastor of that 
church on Friday afternoon, February 11, 
at 3:30 p. m., when Mrs. Elizabeth Schock 
Shoemaker was married to Earnest Floyd 
Showalter. The bride, a daughter of Aaron 
and Bessie Cling Siegrist, was born in Lan- 
caster County, Pennsylvania, more lately a 
resident of Rockingham County, Virginia, 
near Linville. The groom is a well-known 
farmer, prominent churchman of Antioch 
Church, active in civic affairs and highly 
respected throughout our church. 

Following a wedding trip to Baltimore 
and points north they will be at home to 
their friends at Harrisonburg, Route 4, Vir- 
ginia. We wish for them much happiness. 

ROBERT. A. WHITTEN. 



February 17, 1949. 



Page Eleven. 



Youth at Work in the Church 

Ann Truitt, Editor; Helen Jackson, C. B. Twiddy, Assoiates. 



TO EASTERN VIRGINIA PILGRIM 
FELLOWSHIPPERS. 

The Executive Committee of the 
Eastern Virginia Pilgrim Fellowship 
met Thursday night, January 20 for 
the purpose of deciding where and 
when to have our Spring Rally. We 
decided to meet at Liberty Spring 
Christian Church, Sunday, March 27, 
from 2 :00 until 5 :00 p. m. We are 
planning a very interesting program, 
which Ave will tell you more about at 
a later date. We hope you will begin 
planning now to have a large attend- 
ance at this very important meeting. 

It was brought to our attention at 
this meeting that the Pilgrim Fellow- 
ship is behind in paying their appor- 
tionment to the Southern Convention 
and we would like very much to have 
this paid. 

It was suggested that we ask each 
Young People's group in Eastern Vir- 
ginia to have a public program dur- 
ing Youth Week and take up a Spe- 
cial Offering for the Pilgrim Fellow- 
ship. If this is not possible, surely 
there is an appropriate place in one 
of your services or programs to take 
up this offering. Again, if you can- 
not do this, we would like you to make 
whatever contribution you can to this 
cause. We would like to say, that the 
projects of the Pilgrim Fellowship 
have been supported in the past by 
contributions from the various Young 
People's groups in the Southern Con- 
vention. 

We will appreciate your coopera- 
tion in helping to raise this money 
and by your attendance making our 
Spring Rally a most successful one. 

Jack Byrd, President. 
Claire B. Tucker, 
Pu b I icity Chairman . 

P. S. : Send all contributions for the 
Pilgrim Fellowship to John Truitt, 
Jr., P. 0. Box 364, Suffolk, Va. 



FORSYTH FELLOWSHIP MEETS. 

Seventy-five young people from our 
county churches and First Church, 
Greensboro, gathered at Winston-Sa- 
lem on Sunday evening, January 30. 
Forsyth County Youth Fellowship 
officers are as follows : Bobby Jean 
Kimball, president; Lura Neal (Be- 



lews Creek), vice-president; Jo Ann 
Johnson (Salem Chapel), secretary- 
treasurer ; Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Bink- 
ley and Mr. & Mrs. Watson Flynt, 
adult counsellors. 



SEEING IS BELIEVING. 
(Continued from page 2.) 

I was at the dedication of that church ! 
I saw 102 certificates of appreciation 
given to men and the boys who had 
worked as volunteers to build that 
church. And I was surprised that 
we had loaned them and granted 
them so little. And when I asked 
about, I was told it was because they 
came into being late, and the treasu- 
ries were stripped. There was noth- 
ing that we could do to help that 
church ! But that group of people 
because they were artisans, organized 
themselves, found a foreman, and in 
the end the foreman was a volunteer 
as well as the rest of them and he and 
the minister went around San Diego 
getting the corporations to help with 
gifts of materials. I told them about 
the little old church in Connecticut 
where I go in the summer with a 
plaque on the front wall. "In memory 
of those who built this house to the 
glory of God," and I told them, "Per- 
haps some day there will be a plaque 
like that in this church for you." 

Do you know every time I'm in a 
new church I realize that church ex- 
tension means evangelism too. Built 
for the Glory of God ! We who know 
what our churches mean to us can 
well realize what the need is of 
churches all over the country in these 
new communities. I have been told 
that perhaps 200 churches might be 
the fair share of what we should be 
building right now in these changing 
times and changing communities. But 
do you know we have only 33 under- 
way ! Because we have no further 
gifts through the Post-War Emergen- 
cy Program, or through apportion- 
ment, and now in our Christian World 
Mission they have assigned to us 
$318,000 for new churches. Still far 
from adequate ! Oh, how important 
that our Christian World Mission be 
a success. It will mean life for our 
denomination if we can get $318,000 
for new high potential churches with- 
in this year and again next year. ' ' 



CHRISTIANITY FACES 

COMMUNISM. 
(Continued from page 6.) 

where, since the region was taken over 
in 1946 no regular church services 
have been allowed, two of our pastors 
have been imprisoned. Christians 
have not dared visit each other, or 
their pastors, and it has been danger- 
ous to have a hymnal or Bible in 
sight. 

Since Tunghsien and Yenching lo- 
cated to the east and west of Peip- 
ing were "liberated" some weeks ago, 
word has come through that as in 
Shansi religious freedom and protec- 
tion of mission property and activi- 
ties are promised. So as I said above, 
Christianity is being given a further 
chance — to see what it can do. 

Most of our missionaries and most 
of the Chinese Christian leaders are 
still in North China, though they are 
few in number in comparison with 
the extensive propaganda department 
of the Communists. We may say as 
did the disciples of old of the few 
loaves and fishes, "What are these 
among many?" But with Christ's 
blessing the little became much. We 
pray that it will be so again. What 
a responsibility rests on the shoulders 
of these Christian leaders and mis- 
sionaries. 

But let us remember that the task 
is not just theirs, it is ours; it is the 
task of the Christians in America. 

No one knows how long this chance 
we have will last. While it lasts, are 
those in China going to be hindered 
by lack of funds or lack of personnel? 
That is the question the Christians in 
America must answer. 

Christianity is Communism's great- 
est and last enemy. Communism is 
Christianity's greatest challenge. 



A splendid steamer was launched on 
Lake Champlain. She made her way 
safely across the lake and started back 
when a storm came upon her, the en- 
gines were disabled and she drifted to 
the rocks. "Out with the anchor!" 
said the captain, and the command 
was obeyed, but still she drifted, and, 
although the anchor was down, she 
crashed against the rocks with an aw- 
ful force, and all because the anchor 
chain was three feet too short. Your 
morality, so far as it goes, may be a 
good thing, but it does not reach the 
standard of God, nor can it until you 
are safely united to Christ ; and if you 
have put him out of your life and 
stand alone in the midst of the rising 
floods, then how wilt thou do in the 
swelling of Jordan. — J. W. Chapman. 



Page Tivelve. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Sunday School Lesson 

By Rev. H. S. Hardcastle, D. D. 



THE STANDARDS OF THE 
KINGDOM. 

Lesson IX— February 27, 1949. 
Memory Selection : Seek first his 

kingdom and his righteousness. — 

Matthew 6 :33. 
Lesson : Matthew 5-7. 
Devotional Reading : Matthew 13 : 

44-53. 

Help! S. 0. S. ! Help! Three 
whole chapters of the Master's teach- 
ings, the very essence and heart of all 
He said, in one Sunday School 'Les- 
son ! ! ! ! How will one go about teach- 
ing this lesson ? It is quite clear that 
he cannot take up three chapters, 
verse by verse — he could spend a 
whole quarter or even a whole year on 
today's lesson if he did that. He 
could of course simply take a few- 
verses, or one section, and use that as 
the background of his teaching. But 
that would not give anywhere near 
what the Lesson Committee had in 
mind for this lesson. Perhaps the best 
thing he can do is to analyze this 
Sermon on the Mount and present the 
main divisions of it, or the topics 
treated by it, in a condensed form. 
That ought, to be clone and it can be 
done. In fact your scribe is going to 
try to do that even in the brief space 
of these Notes. 

The Character of the Citizens of 
the Kingdom. 

The Beatitudes present in a striking 
way the character of the citizens of 
the Kingdom of God. Certain quali- 
ties of mind and heart, humility, the 
capacity to be sorry for sin as well 
as to sympathize with others, meek- 
ness, an eagerness to learn and to 
grow, the spirit of mercy, sincerity 
and purity of motive, the desire for 
and dedication to the cause of peace, 
the willingness to endure even perse- 
cution for the sake of righteousness 
and the capacity to suffer for Christ's 
sake — these at least are some of the 
qualities of mind and heart that char- 
acterize the citizens of the Kingdom. 
It should be noted, too, that these 
qualities are the source of happiness 
or blessedness in human life. Happi- 
ness does not come from without, it 
comes from within. 

The Function of the Citizens of 
the Kingdom. 

In two brief — very brief — para- 
graphs, Jesus states the mission of the 



members of the Kingdom. They are 
to be as salt in the world, a seasoning, 
saving element or factor. They are 
to be as light, a cheering, guiding, 
cleansing, healing, life-giving force in 
human society. 

The Citizens of the Kingdom and 
Law. 

Their righteousness is to be beyond 
the righteousness of the scribes and 
Pharisees. That was formal, legal, 
external, cold, lifeless, hypocritical. 
In contrast the righteousness of mem- 
bers of the kingdom was to be inner, 
gracious, vital, redemptive, real. The 
motive, not the act was the ultimate 
thing that counted. The law said that 
worship was first, Christ said that 
right spirit in the heart was first. The 
law said that a man must not kill ; 
Jesus said that a man must not harbor 
even hard thoughts in his heart. The 
law said that a man must not com- 
mit adultery; Jesus said a man must 
not stand on a street corner and think 
unclean thoughts as a woman passed 
by. The law said that a man could 
divorce his wdfe for the most trivial 
thing; Jesus said that, only adultery 
was sufficient grounds for divorce. 
The law said that a man 's words were 
made good by an oath in the sense of 
taking an oath ; Jesus said that a 
man's words ought to be good even 
though he was not under oath. The 
law said that a man should love hjs 
neighbor but hate his enemy; but Je- 
sus said a man should love his enemies 
and even pray for those who despite- 
fully used him. The citizens of the 
Kingdom were to go the second mile, 
they were to take as their ideal per- 
fection itself, they Avere to strive to 
be like God their Father, himself. 
Their lives were to be different from 
the lives of those not citizens of the 
kingdom. 

The Citizens of the Kingdom, and 
t Religious Acts. 

Sincerity, genuiness, reality was to 
be the distinguishing mark of the 
citizens of the kingdom in their re- 
ligious acts and practices. Take for 
instance, the matter of giving alms, 
of administering charity. It was to 
be done not to be seen of men, but to 
help men, and to be seen of God. Its 
motive was concern for others, com- 
passion, love, not a desire to get on 
the front pages of the newspaper. Or 



February 17, 1949. 

again the matter of prayer. Men were 
to pray not to be seen of men but to 
be heard of God. Prayer was not a 
matter of showing off, but of sharing 
the life of God. When men prayed 
they were to be sincere. Their prayer- 
were to be marked by brevity, simple 
language, a sense of need, a regard for 
others, and by resignation to the 
Father's will. A willingness to for- 
give others was absolutely essential to 
forgiveness for one's self. Fasting 
was likewise a matter of inner spirit, 
rather than of outward forms. Men 
were to fast unto God and not before 
men. In the giving of alms, in prayer, 
in fasting, and in everything else 
men were to be sincere, simlple, sub- 
missive. 

The Citizens of the Kingdom and 
Material Things. 

The Master had something to say 
about material things. He did not 
condemn them. But He did subordi- 
nate them to other things. They were 
means to an end, not an end in them- 
selves. They were temporal in nature. 
And the love of them was dangerous 
and deadly. They were to be put 
beneath the Kingdom — men Avere to 
seek first the Kingdom of God and 
his righteousness. But those who did 
thus seek the Kingdom first would be 
assured to a sufficient supply of ma- 
terial things. Faith in God was an 
antidote against restlessness and an- 
xiety and Avorry about material 
things. The attempt to serve both 
God and gold Avas impossible. But 
one could serve God with gold. 

The Citizen of the Kingdom and 
Others. 

There are sundry rules concerning 
our attitude and conduct toAA'ard oth- 
ers. There is for instance the matter 
of judging others. It is both unfair, 
unscientific and unsafe. There is too 
a matter of personal integrity in some 
things — men are not to cast their 
pearls before swine. And even the 
citizens of the kingdom are not to be 
gullible and to let folks get by with 
everything. They are to be on their 
guard against AA'olves in sheep's cloth- 
ing. They are to judge men, not so 
much by profession as by perform- 
ance. ' ' By their fruits shall ye know 
them," said the Master. Mere say- 
ing Avas not enough It Avas those who 
do the Father's will who would enter 
into the kingdom. It Avas all summed 
up in AAdiat. AA T e call the Golden Rule. 
Hoav shall Ave treat others? With a 
stroke of spiritual genius Jesus 
summed it all up in a few AA^ords, 
timeless and universal in their appli- 
cation. "Put. yourself in the other 
(Continued on page 13.) 



February 17, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Thirteen. 



PEN PORTRAITS OF THE DISCIPLES 
OF CHRIST. • 
IV. JOHN. 

By Samuel Lawrence Johnson, 
Pastor, Park Manor Church, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

John ("the disciple whom the Lord 
loved"), was the only one of the 
Twelve to be present at time of the 
Crucifixion. He was drawn to the 
Master in those last moments by an 
ardent affection and he remained at 
the foot of the cross despite personal 
danger. Perhaps, too, he relied to no 
little extent upon his family connec- 
tions with the High Priest. There at 
the cross Jesus placed his mother into 
John's care. 

That this apostle was very close to 
Jesus is indicated by the fact that he, 
with Peter and James, witnessed the 
raising of Jarius ' daughter ; were 
nearest to the Lord during the agony ; 
and were present at the transfigura- 
tion. Also it was John and Peter who 
were sent to prepare the passover. 

Some time after the resurrection 
John left Jerusalem and took up resi- 
dence in Ephesus. He remained for 
some time in Asia after which he 
visited Rome. In Rome he is supposed 
to have been arrested for his preach- 
ing and placed in a cauldreon of boil- 
ing oil, but miraculously was saved 
from death. Afterward during the 
reign of Domitian he was banished 
from Rome and exiled to the Island 
of Patmos where he wrote his Revela- 
tion. 

Clement of Alexandria, Polyerates, 
Tertullian and other ancient writers 
tell many stories of John's work in 
Asia. Two stories of his old age are 
preserved for us, one told by Cassian 
of how John used to play with a tame 
partridge, and when censured for his 
foolishness by one of his disciples 
ansAvered, ' ' The bow cannot be always 
bent. " The other by Jerome describes 
him when he was too old to speak at 
length and contented himself with re- 
peating "Little children, love one an- 
other. ' ' 

There are adequate reasons for ac- 
cepting John 's authorship of the writ- 
ings ascribed to him, namely : the Gos- 
pel, the Reveation and his three let- 
ters. Although John was "just a 
fisherman" his writings suggest he 
was well educated and an able scholar. 
We may reasonably assume that he 
died a natural death. 



The price of power is responsibility 
for the public good. — Winthrop W. 
Aklrich. 



WHAT ABOUT CHINA TODAY? 
(Continued from page 5.) 

Old American friends have again 
been among them, serving in familiar 
ways, or bringing new and fresh 
ideas, methods, and material equip- 
ment to replenish depleted and out- 
worn stores. 

At least a few new missionaries, 
young, vigorous, ardent, have become 
known to them, an earnest and pledge 
that the international comradeship of 
the Body of Christ shall not be broken 
by the inevitable attrition of the 
years. 

We Must Not Abandon Our Work 

in Ch ina Now. 
The American Board, in continual 
consultation with other boards as to 
the wisest and most effective methods, 
will maintain, serve and strengthen 
in every way possible those who are 
bearing the Christian witness amidst 
the shadows that envelop China. Our 
concerns are primarily with the peo- 
ple of China, and their needs abide, 
regardless of political changes. It 
would be cowardly to withdraw our 
help to Christian schools and Chris- 
tian hospitals and the bearers of the 
Christian evangel until forced to do 
so by circumstances beyond our con- 
trol. That time has not yet come — it 
may never come. Our relations are 
primarily with a part of the Christian 
community of China — our brothers 
and sisters in Christ, a part of the 
Body of Christ, the organism through 
which his spirit finds expression in 
society. We should suffer no less than 
they if we voluntarily cut ourselves 
off from them. May God help us to 
be as faithful as they will be ! 

Earle H. Ballou, 
Fred Field Goodsell. 



LETTERS FROM SHAOWU. 
(Continued from page 8.) 
Germany were at the close of the 
war and China seems to be now, and 
see our society and everything we had 
faith in crumbing about us, with no 
place to flee to. With this feeling of 
security which we have, the financial 
success or failure of the hospital does 
not matter so much to us, and we can 
go ahead and plan other outlets for 
work, such as Fran's community 
health education projects with moth- 
ers and babies and in the schools, 
which are now going full tilt. But 
it is no cinch for the Chinese staff, in 
the position they are in, to plan and 
carry on worthwhile side projects 
which have no relation to their im- 
mediate livelihood. But Dr. Chu has 
just opened a prevention of blindness 



clinic at our East Gate branch, at 
which no fees are to be accepted. And 
when the Catholic Mission here, who 
are expecting a new electric generator 
to arrive from Shanghai sometime 
soon, offered to let us use the current 
to run our X-ray machine in a co- 
operative venture with their hospital, 
our business manager - X - ray tech- 
nician immediately began spending all 
his spare time brushing up on the 
techniques of his new job. 

The Jacksons, with their new baby, 
are now back from Foochow, and Miss 
Burr is back from America ; so our 
mission circle is larger again ; and 
the fellowship we get from our weekly 
hike in the country followed by sup- 
per and evening meeting, and such 
affairs as our Thanksgiving dinner to- 
gether and our occasional evening of 
"Rook," is giving our spirits a good 
boost. And I am now finding that 
our married life, already six months 
old, is wearing better all the time, and 
that our cozy new home, finally com- 
pleted and furnished, is awfully com- 
forting and relaxing. I don't have 
any more country trips or excursions 
to report this time, but life goes on 
with never a dull moment and always 
full of interest. 

Ed Riggs. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON 
(Continued from page 12.) 
fellow's place and then treat him as 
you would want him to treat you." 
It is to be worked at all times in all 
places by all men. In the light of it 
every sensible man cries out, "Who 
is sufficient for these things?" and 
every sensible man knows that his suf- 
ficiency for this high moral code is 
from God alone. 

Hearing and Doing. 

The wise man obeys the truth that 
commends itself to his conscience. 
When he does this lie builds on a rock, 
his life has a good foundation against 
the stresses and strains and storms of 
human experience from within and 
without. The foolish man who fails 
to do this ultimately goes down in 
wreck and ruin. 

A Note of Authority. 

The words carried their own vindi- 
cation. When even the common peo- 
ple heard the Master, they knew He 
spoke with authority. We will do 
well to hear and to heed His words. 



We are apt to say that money talks, 
but it speaks a broken and poverty- 
stricken language. Hearts talk bet- 
ter, clearer and with wider intelli- 
gence. — William Allen White. 



Page Fourteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 17, 1949. 



(ajajajaMaEMMEjaiaiaiaMsiaMaMSMSMEMsia 



SThe Orphanage | 
Chas. D. Johnston, Supt. |j 



Dear Friends: 

It takes faith to run an Orphanage. 
It takes faith in God. It takes faith 
in our church people. If I had not 
had that faith 1 would never have 
accepted the work in the beginning. 
Faith has been with me all these 
years. After I was elected Superin- 
tendent of the Orphanage I went to 
the Lord in prayer and promised Him 
I would accept the work if He would 
stand by my side and bless me in this 
work. All the thirty-two years I have 
been in this work I have always felt 
that He is very near and that I could 
reach out my hand and touch the 
hem of His garment when discourage- 
ments stood before me and I needed 
His help. Many have been the times 
when our financial needs were more 
than we could meet, and many have 
been the times when offerings would 
come in from some unexpected source 
to take care of the need. I often 
think of a story Dr. George M. Muller 
told in his book. He was Superinten- 
dent of a large Orphanage in Bristol, 
England. He was a man of faith and 
prayer. He said he gave his large 
group of children all the food he had 
for supper one night and went to his 
room, got down on his knees and told 
the Lord that he gave the children in 
his care all the food he had for supper 
and he would expect Him to supply 
Food for breakfast. Sometime during 
the night someone filled the front 
porch with food, and the children had 
breakfast. 

My father taught me a lesson in 
faith when I was a very small boy, 
three or Four years old. He and a 
carpenter were laying a floor in an 
upper room, which was an addition 
to our home, and when they were 
nearly through they missed a little 
plane they had been using. They fi- 
nally s;iw it between the ceiling and 
the flooring about half way across the 
room. The only way they saw to get 
to it was for me to crawl between 
the joist and get it and back out. I 
was afraid to do it. I remember Fa- 
ther said to me: "I will hold this 
candle over at this end so you can 
see from your end." I said, "Sup- 
pose I get fastened and cannot get 
back?" And Father said, "I will 
tear the floor up and take you out." 
T had faith to believe he would do it ; 
so I crawled in there, got the plan and 



backed out. I knew Father would do County : 

what he said, and to this day I often ^ance (Proctor children) $120.00 

, . , „ , • . , ■ Guilford (Ridge children) 60.00 

think of that little instant in my 180.00 

young life. - 

Faith in God. Faith in our church Total this week from 
p eop l e Special Offerings $ 354.29 

Chas. D. Johnston, Total this year from 

Superintendent. Special Offerings $2,110.10 

REPORT FOR FEBRUARY 17, 1949. Gv;uul total for the week • ; $ 623 " Q4 

Sunday School Monthly Offerings. total for the year . . $3,276.72 

Amount brought forward $ 897.87 

Eastern N. C. Conference: 

Beulah $ 3.30 SEMINAR TO BE HELD. 

Catawba Springs 36.00 , . -. „ n \ ' 

Hope Mills 5.43 (Continued from page 3.) 

Wake Chapel S. S 41.41 son Street, beginning at 10 :30 a. m. 

86.14 Luncheon will be served at 12 :45 at a 

Eastern Va, Conference: cogt Qf $1 m latg Luncheon res . 

Rosemont (Simmons chil- ,. n i -.«- t -i 

(lren ) $ 25 00 ervations should be made by March 1 

Rosemont S. S 50.00 to Dean William R. Strassner, Shaw 

75.00 University, Raleigh, N. C. 

N. C. & Va. Conference: FREDERICK B. EuTSLER. 

Ingram 15.21 

Western N. C. Conference : 

Pleasant Union S. S $11.83 CHURCH WOMEN AT WORK. 

Ramseur S. S 30.57 (Continued from page 9.) 

42.40 ... 

Va. Valley Conference: chicken on hot biscuits with all the 

Winchester 50.00 dressings. It was a happy evening, 

and incidentally, the first meeting of 

Total this week from churches $ 268.75 it s kind to be held in the" social hall of 

„..,,. „ . , ~ ... .„ our new parsonage. 

Total this year from churches $1,166.62 , . . , , ' , 

We plan to unite with other church 

Special Offerings. women of our city in the World Day 

Amount brought forward $1,755.81 of Praver ' 

Mr. Cooke, children $10.00 TJ . • ' * , .'~ 

Mr. Rowland, children .. 20.00 Xt 18 nlCe t0 feel yourself P art g£ a 

Mrs. Leigh, children .... 38.99 group that is part of a world group 

Mrs. Simmons, children . 25.00 and to know that as we study, work, 

Raymond Love 20.00 serve, pray and give together the cir- 

Sr* !?£ V"* ™ cle widens, for truly there are "Ho- 

Mr. C. H. Darden 50.00 . TT ' 

Mr. A. R. Flowers 1.00 nzons Unlimited. 

Sale of eggs 1.25 Mrs. Grover Daugherty, 

174.29 ' Secretary. 

P » ™ " IIIHIIII IIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli 

I STANDA ART ORGAN CO., Inc. | 

BUILDERS OF FINE CHURCH PIPE ORGANS 1 
| Suffolk, Virginia P. O. Box 696 

We gladly submit estimates and drawings for a new j 
"Standaart" organ without any obligation on your part. [ 

I • I 

When building a new church, we will be only too 
glad to cooperate with your architects in designing the j 
organ chambers, without any charge to you. 
| •• • ' | 

All our instruments are custom-built and guaranteed | 
for a period of twenty years. ,| 

I • I 

| Contact our service department for a yearly main- ; § 

| tenance contract for/or restoration of your present organ. j 

| • | 

Builders of the four-manual Cathedral Organ in Main 

| Street Methodist Church, Suffolk, Virginia. j 



minim i mm mill' 



iiimiii ii liimii i immiiiiiii mini imiiiiiiiiiimiimi in i mm iiimiiHtimiim iiniiiiiiiiiiiinr 



February 17, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Fifteen. 



In Memoriam 



CARR. 

In loving memory of Mr. J. W. Carr who 
departed this life after several months of 
declining health. It can be said he was 
faithful in his home and to his family. His 
companion preceded him several months. 

Therefore, be it resolved: 

1. That we bow in humble submission to 
God's will. 

2. That we express our sincere sympathy 
to his two children. 

3. That a -copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family, one recorded on the rec- 
ords of Mt. Oarmel Church and one to be 
published in The Christian Sun. 

Mrs. W. T. COX, 
Mrs. JULIAN CARR, 
Mrs. OTIS V. JOYNER, 

Committee. 



DUCK. 

Our Heavenly Father, Who doeth all 
things well has recently seen fit to remove 
from our midst one who has gone in and out 
among us for a number of years, our friend 
and sister, Mrs. Mary R. J. Duck. She was 
one of the oldest members of Mt. Carmel 
Church. 

Therefore, be it resolved : 

j, That we bow in humble submission to 
the will of our Heavenly Father who doeth 
all things well. 

2. That we extend our warmest sympathy 
and earnest prayers to her children that 
God's promises may fall soothingly upon 
their hearts and when life's work is done 
they may form an unbroken circle around 
His throne. 

3. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family, one placed on our church 
records and one published in The Christian 
Sun. 

Mrs. W. T. COX, 
Mrs. JULIAN CARR, 
Mrs. OTIS V. JOYNER, 

Committee. 



HOWERTON. 

On September 23, 1948, God in His infi- 
nite wisdom saw fit to call from our midst 
Mrs. Cora Howerton. Mrs. Howerton was a 
faithful member of Hines Chapel Church 
and was regular in attendance until failing 
health prevented. She was a good neighbor, 
a devoted mother, a loving grandmother and 
always untiring in her efforts to serve those 
she loved. 

Therefore, be it resolved : 

1. That we are grateful for what her life 
has meant to us as individuals and also for 
what it has meant to those whom she loved 
and served. 

2. That we realize God doeth all things 
well and we bow in humble submission to 
His will. 

3. That we extend to her loved ones our 
sincere and heartfelt sympathy and pray 
God's blessings may rest upon them. 

4. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to The Christian Sun for publication, 
one sent to the family and a copy be entered 
on the church records. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. R. W. ISELEY, 
Mrs. J. W. ISELEY, 
Mr. MONROE MARTIN, 

Committee. 



GERRINGER. 

On August 11, 1948, God called from her 
labors Mrs. A. D. Gerringer, a member of 
Hines Chapel Congregational Christian 
Church. In her life we saw a good expres- 
sion of true Christian character. She was 
quiet, unassuming, humble, yet firm and 
steadfast in her devotion to Christian prin- 
ciples and practices. The very last place 
she went before she passed away was to her 
church. The problems of her church were 
her problems and she was ever ready to help 
in any way she could in building up God's 
Kingdom. 

Therefore, be it resolved : 

1. That in her death we have lost a faith- 
ful member. Her life and devotion will be a 
sacred memory. 

2. That the members tender their sincere 
sympathy to the family in the passing of 
their mother. 

3. That while we shall miss her presence 
we will be consoled by the thought that 
our loss is her eternal gain. 

4. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family, a copy to The Christian 
Sun for publication and a copy placed on 
the church records. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. R. W. ISELEY, 
Mrs. J. W. ISELEY, 
Mr. MONROE MARTIN, 

Committee. 



PHILLIPS. 

On October 10, 1948, God in His infinite 
wisdom and great love saw fit to call from 
her earthly labors and bodily suffering Mrs. 
Noah Phillips. She was in ill health for a 
great part of her life, and bore her suffering 
in a quietness and meekness that was char- 
acteristic of her. The light of Jesus shone 
on her countenance. To know her was to 
love her. Her place in the Hines Chapel 
Church and Community is vacant and our 
hearts are saddened. 

In recognition of her faithful and short 
life, we offer the following resolutions of re- 
spect : 

1. That the Sunday school and church 
wish to express their deep sense of loss and 
gratitude for a beautiful life lived in our 
midst. 

2. That we extend our heartfelt sympathy 
to her devoted family who ministered to her 
so faithfully during her illness, and com- 
mend them to our Heavenly Father for com- 
fort and peace, realizing that His grace is 
sufficient for all our needs. 

3. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to her bereaved family, a copy to The 
Christian Sun for publication and a copy be 
entered on the church records of the church. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. R. W. ISELEY, 
Mrs. J. W. ISELEY, 
Mr. MONROE MARTIN, 

Committee. 



APPLE. 

"Blessed are the dead that die in the 
Lord." Such is the end of the Christian's 
earthly existence; such, we believe, marked 
the end of the earthly life of a noble mother, 
and a devoted wife, Mrs. G. P. Apple, a 
member of our church for many years, who 
passed away January 22, 1949. She always 
wore a pleasant smile which was an indica- 
tion of her cheerful spirit. Mrs. Apple was 
in ill health for several years. She bore 
her pain with Christian fortitude, was pa- 



tient in her suffering and had a calm resig- 
nation, which reflected a firm faith. 
Therefore, be it resolved : 

1. That we rejoice in the triumph of her 
release from the burden of pain, to enter 
into the life more abundant, to be forever 
with the Lord. 

2. That we share the sorrow of her loved 
ones, but comfort them with the hope which 
we have in Christ of meeting loved ones 
again in the land where flowers never fade 
and where sorrow and separation never 
come. 

3. That while we shall miss her presence, 
we will be consoled by the thought that our 
loss is her eternal gain. 

4. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to The Christian Sun for publication, 
a copy sent to the family and a copy be 
entered on our church record. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. R. W. ISELEY, 
Mis. J. W. ISELEY, 
Mr. MONROE MARTIN, 

Committee. 



ROTHGEB. 

Mrs. Keyser (Marguerite Daffan) Roth- 
geb was born in Culpeper County, Va., July 
15, 1895, and was translated from this life, 
January 5, 1949. A daughter of William 
Pierce and Lizzie Pemberton Daffan, gradu- 
ate of the Morrisville High School, a grad- 
uate of the Fredericksburg State Teachers 
College and a teacher in the Faquier and 
Page Counties for seventeen years. 

The deceased was married to Keyser T. 
Rothgeb, September 22, 1934, and with her 
husband had made her home since their 
marriage at Leaksville. Mrs. Rothgeb was 
a member of the Leaksville Church and ac- 
tive in the work of the church. At the time 
of her death she was employed by the Leg- 
gefs Department Store in Luray. As a 
token of appreciation and respect, the store 
was closed for two hours during the time of 
her funeral. One of the officials of the com- 
pany together with all the employees attend- 
ed the services. 

For a large store to close on a busy Sat- 
urday afternoon for one of its employees, 
is in itself, a real tribute of praise to the 
one thus honored. The Page News Courier 
gave the following in the account of her 
passings: "She was a woman of fine Chris- 
tian character, a sweet and generous nature, 
liked by people in every walk of life and 
made friends with all whom she came in 
contact with." 

A large congregation that overflowed the 
church gathered to pay a final tribute of 
love and respect to her untimely passing 
and to comfort the heart of her loyal and 
faithful husband in his hour of bereavement. 
Her pastor, Rev. R. E. Newton, conducted 
the services, being assisted by the writer. 
Burial was in the church cemetery at Leaks- 
ville. 

In submission to the will of Him who 
doeth all things well and knowing that our 
loss is her eternal gain we give thanks for 
her beautiful life which enriched the hearts 
of all who knew her. 

"Sweet was the soul, and brave the lips 
That quivering uttered no complaints. 
We give thee to our Father's heart, 
Thou Christian saint." 

ROBERT A. WHITTEN. 



Page Sixteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 17, 1949. 



Report From Fort Berthold Indian Mission 
Elbowoods, North Dakota 

By HAROLD W. CASE 



I have always bragged about our winters 
here, being moderate and enjoyable, but it 
seems that this year Old Man Winter has surely 
made up for his previous leniency. Snow, snow 
and more snow with one blizzard following 
another, and roads impassable for much of the 
time. And even now the wind is raising again 
so that it is futile to try and shovel out. It has 
driven me to the saddle again. Emergencies 
must be met in some way, which we are always 
endeavoring to do. Winter has been severe 
and is not over with yet. There will be consid- 
erable loss of stock this winter 
for the snow is so deep even in 
the timber where our cattle us- 
ually winter. 

With the building of the 
Garrison Dam going on and 
the coming evacuation of the 
Indian people officially set for 
1953, though we do hope for 
an extension of that time, the 
special church gatherings are 
becoming more and more 
meaningful. The people are 
going to be moved in so many 
different directions that our 
churches when moved or re- 
built in other locations will be 
made up of entirely different 
people. Whereas, now the 
Three Tribes are mainly in set- 
tled districts, when the evacuation takes place 
they will be shuffled considerably according to 
the location of their land holdings and will live 
in the five segments which constitute the re- 
maining acreage of their reservation, and these 
five segments will be separated by this huge 
body of water, which is spoken of as the 
largest man-created lake in the world. 

It is expected that probably one hundred 
families of our three hundred and fifty will 
leave the reservation. Here we have the task 
of moulding the thought of the white people 
in the towns they will move to, that they may 
be accepted as neighbors and into the fellow- 
ship of worshippers and followers. At home 
on the field we must keep very close to the 
people as they give up their homelands of gen- 
erations with heartache and sorrow. There are 
many hardships and difficult adjustments to be 




REV. HAROLD W. CASE 



made. They have lost confidence pretty much 
in Government administration, that only the 
Church remains as their source of security. 
They have that deep-down feeling that the 
Christian Church will not let them down, and 
we musn't. It is up to the Church to inspire 
these people to try to make something good 
out of their tragedy. It is up to the Church to 
lead in economic and spiritual stability. It is 
up to the Church to lend every aid to them in 
the acculturation process before them. 

We have a new find in an Indian lad whose 
name is Fox. Already, he has 
some training and a gift of ex- 
plaining the Gospel in both his 
own tongue as well as English. 
We hope some means will be 
available to keep him in his 
daily bread, for he has a family 
of four children, while he 
serves his people as a minister. 

The task ahead is challeng- 
ing. The opportunity is un- 
usual. We need your prayers 
for such a time as this and we 
rejoice that we can carry on as 
your representatives. I shall al- 
ways cherish the month I spent 
among you, the friendships re- 
newed and new friends made, 
and I know that each one will 
always have room in his heart 
for the American Indian, whose land we have 
taken from him. 

-y- - y -if, y -yt- 

TV" TT TT TP TP 

Legislation for settlement of our people's 
claim will be introduced in this 81st Session of 
Congress. No bill has been drawn as of this 
date. In addition to the five million dollars, 
they ask for nearly seven million more. All of 
which is only just compensation for satisfac- 
tory rehabilitation of the people. It means 
much acreage will have to be purchased back 
from the white people if their economic status 
is to be maintained. You can help by writing 
the Chairman of the Indian Affairs Sub-Com- 
mittee of the House, as well as your own repre- 
sentatives. Urge them to bring an end to the 
"Century of Dishonor" of our Nation's deal- 
ings with the Indian. Mr. Case urges that you 
do this at once. 



^mm ^^ry. 1956. 

1844 - Over a Centur^of^e^entai^Denomination - 1949 

The CHRISTIAN SUN 

ORGAN OF THE SOUTHERN CONVENTION OF CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 
In Essentials, Unity — In Non-Essentials, Liberty — In All Things, Charity 



Volume CI. RICHMOND, VA., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1949. Number 8. 




Cut Courtesy of Winchester Evening Star 

HOME OF REV. R. A. WHITTEN AND FAMILY 

Conservative estimates of the cost of the new Winchester Parsonage at 108 West 
Clifford Street range up to $30,000. Clayton A. Pugh, who personally supervised the 
construction, made a valuable contribution to the church in the selection of materials 
and the cost of having the work done. Thus the actual expenditure to the church was 
less than $25,000. 

This new building, in addition to providing a lovely home for the minister and his 
family, has also a spacious social hall in the basement with complete kitchen, making 
it possible for group meetings and meals served if desired. 

This house is considered a monument to the loyal support and sacrificial giving 
of members and friends who made it possible. 



Page Two. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 24, 1949. 



1 News Flashes 1 



Dr. Stanley U. North of New York 
City preached last Sunday morning 
at our Lynchburg Church. 



Our sympathy to lie v. J. Frank 
Morgan of Windsor who was stricken 
with an illness last Sunday. 



Dr. Thomas Anderson completed 
five full years of service as minister of 
Central Church of Atlanta last Sun- 
day. 

Dr. Ferris E. Reynolds of the Elon 
College faculty preached at the Suf- 
folk Christian Church last Sunday 
morning. 



Rev. George V. Gardner who has 
served the Congregational Church of 
Claridon, Ohio, until recently, is now 
living at 2127 Park Avenue, Rich- 
mond, Virginia, and is available for 
pulpit supply on Sundays. 



Rev. I. Stuart McElroy, District 
Secretary of the American Bible So- 
ciety with headquarters in Richmond, 
Virginia, spoke to the Piedmont Min- 
isters ' Association at Elon College on 
Monday, February 14. 



Recent visitors to the Pfafftown 
Church near Winston - Salem were 
Mr. and Mrs. Worth Utt of our Elks 
Spur Church, Fancy Gap, Virginia. 
Visitors at the Winston-Salem Church 
included Dr. N. G. Newman of Ral- 
eigh, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Scearce, Jr., 
of Greensboro and Happy Home 
Church. 



Displaced persons, arriving ten 
thousand per month on our shores, are 
receiving immediate help through 
Church World Service in getting 
transported to their places of resi- 
dence, having friendly assistance with 
their questions and necessary arrange- 
ments. Mrs. Jennie Pratt, our rep- 
resentative on Ellis Island, has daily 
opportunity to lend a helping hand 
and voice to scores of them. 

From Angola, Africa, Henry Mc- 
Dowell reports that a missionary so- 
ciety is being formed in Elende, to 
carry the good news to contract la- 
borers in the fisheries and plantations. 
This is a most significant step : our 
work has become indigenous when our 
missions become themselves mission- 



ary agencies. The chain reaction of 
Christianity has begun to release its 
power in Angola. It is "each one 
teach one" on a tremendous scale. 



Executive Vice-President Elect of 
the American Board, David McKeith, 
Jr., began a six-month visit to our 
fields in Africa and the Near East on 
January 3. During the African leg 
of the trip is accompanied by John 
Reuling, Africa secretary of the 
American Board, whose administra- 
tive duties coincidentally demand a 
trip to our three Africa missions at 
this time. They are taking sound re- 
cording and photographic equipment, 
to collect materials for use by several 
newspapers and denominational agen- 
cies. 



Rev. M. T. Sorrell, Superintendent 
of Faith Home, Danville, Virginia, re- 
ports the completion of the new din- 
ing hall, kitchen and chapel at the 
Home at a cost of $20,000.00. As pas- 
tor of the New Lebanon Church, 
Brother Sorrell reports progress on 
the new building at New Lebanon 
Church, and he reports that by March 
1 or 15 it is hoped that the new build- 
ing at the Third Avenue Church, 
Danville, will be completed. This new 
building project includes 32 Sunday 
school classrooms and three auditori- 
ums. Congratulations to Brother Sor- 
rell in his work. 



TIMELY FILM STRIP. 

On the theory a picture is worth a 
thousand words, the Home Missions 
Council in cooperation with the For- 
eign Missions Conference has pre- 
pared a thirty-minute documentary 
film strip dramatizing "World Day 
of Prayer" projects around the globe. 

Entitled "March of Missions," the 
film strip contains pictures gathered 
from the best available sources, and 
selected by experts intimately famil- 
iar with mission projects. 

The documentary features mission- 
on-wheels in India, where Vellore 
Christian Medical College operates a 
mobile ambulance van to remote rural 
areas, and pictures of missions-on- 
wheels in migrant camps here, where 
a fleet of "Harvesters" travel to give 
migrants a sense of Christian com- 
munity. 

Illiterate Navajos learning to read 
their own language ; boys and girls of 
Turkey welcoming church school pa- 
pers in their own new Romanized al- 
phabet ; foreign students in America 
sharing impressions and experiences, 
and the southern rural Negro learn- 



ing to build a better home and a bet- 
ter church march across the screen, 
transforming " World Day of 
Prayer" offerings in living realities. 

Accompanying the documentary is 
a lively, carefully timed commentary, 
designed to snow the global sweep of 
prayer day projects, and their value 
in terms of Christian action. 

Communities aiming to insure a 
record attendance at their "World 
Day of Prayer" observances should 
welcome "March of Missions" as an 
invaluable aid. The film strip is 
available for two dollars from the of- 
fice of the Home Missions Council, 
297 Fourth Avenue, New York 10, 
New York. 



PEN PORTRAITS OF THE DISCIPLES 
OF CHRIST. 
V. PHILIP. 

By Samuel Lawrence Johnson, 
Pastor, Park Manor Church, 
Chicago, IlUnois. 

When the Twelve were chosen, 
Philip was the first of the second 
quartet and, like the other four who 
had already accepted the call, was a 
native of Bethsaida, and also had been 
a convert to the teachings of John 
the Baptist. 

Philip's name was probably given 
him in honor of Philip, the tetrarch, 
which may account for the "Greeks 
who came to worship at the feast" 
(John 12:21) choosing him to intro- 
duce them to Jesus. They approached 
the right man, for Philip was con- 
vinced that any who would "come 
and see" would believe. 

Philip's philosophy of "the way" 
was that a "believer" must be tried, 
proven, and instructed before he is 
fit to go forth as a teacher of Christ. 
While, on the other hand, he was 
also convinced that one who had in- 
complete insight still could be pos- 
sessed of a spirit through which he 
could advance the Kingdom of God. 

He had three daughters. Two of 
them traveled with him and were 
later buried alongside their father in 
Hierapolis in Asia. The third mar- 
ried and remained in Ephesus. 

Most of the Apostle's work was 
done in Hierapolis but he also 
preached in Ephesus, Phrygia, Lydia, 
and other places in Asia. There are 
conflicting traditions as to the man- 
ner of his death. He appears to have 
lived to ripe old age with some 
sources claiming he died of a natural 
disease at the age of eighty-seven. 
Whereas other ancient authorities 
scribe martyrdom either under Do- 
mitian or Trajan. 



February 24, 1949. 

COUNCIL OF RELIGIOUS EDUCA- 
TION MEETS IN COLUMBUS. 

Since the Southern Convention had 
no reporter at the 27th annual meet- 
ing of the International Council of 
Eeligious Education in Columbus, 
Ohio, excerpts from the report of 
Public Relations Director Lemuel 
Petersen follow : 

Closing six days (Feb. 6-12) of dis- 
cussion of the place of religion in 
community and world life, the Inter- 
nation Council voted to establish a 
new educational department in the 
field of religion and public education. 

Dean Luther A. Weigle, of Yale 
University Divinity School, was chair- 
man of the committee that recom- 
mended the new department. His re- 
port also provided for a permanent 
education committee on religion and 
public education, at least one-third of 
the members to be public school lead- 
ers. Cooperating in these measures 
are 40 Protestant denomintaions of 
the United States and Canada. 
Weekday Church Schools 
Continue. 

Interest in religion and public edu- 
cation was heightened by discussions 
on the Supreme Court ruling on 
weekday church schools made last 
year in the Champaign case. Dr. Roy 
G. Ross, general secretary of the In- 
ternational Council, reported that ap- 
proximately 90 per cent of the na- 
tion's weekday church school classes 
had been able to continue, with some 
adjustments. 

Nothing in American laws, court 
decisions, or traditions prevents "the 
school, within its ownjarogram, from 
making adequate provision for the re- 
ligious interpretation of life," com- 
mented the committee headed by 
Dean "Weigle. This committee called 
on public schools to expose pupils to 
the "belief in God as the Source of 
all spiritual values and material 
goods, the Determiner of the destinies 
of nations, and the loving Father of 
mankind. ' ' 

In the same vein Dr. Samuel P. 
Franklin, dean of the School of Ed- 
ucation, of the University of Pitts- 
burgh, said, "School leaders should 
study their school programs to see 
if they are doing justice to children's 
appreciation of their common relig- 
ious heritage. Then the church must 
give public education the green light 
by removing the feelings of fear and 
threat over the separation of church 
and state issue." 
Religion and Iindividual Problems. 

The relation of religion to an indi- 
vidual's personal and civic life was 
the subject of several speeches and 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 

discussion periods. Dr. Roy A. Burk- 
hart, pastor of the First Community 
Church of Columbus and trustee of 
the Council, warned that churches 
cannot redeem the world unless they 
become more concerned about the in- 
dividual problems and mental health 
of their members than they are about 
the size of their buildings and their 
prestige as institutions. 

"Christian teaching can never be 
complete unless it includes the devel- 
opment of a deep, informed and wise 
sense of political responsibility," de- 
clared Jerry Voorhis, Chicago, ex- 
ecutive secretary of the Cooperative 
League of U.S.A. 

Carrying the community idea to its 
world outreach, Dr. Forrest L. 
Knapp, general secretary of the 
World Council of Christian Educa- 
tion, appealed for the day when "an 
American church will be willing to 
support a missionary who is not an 
American. ' ' 

World Convention in 1950. 

Dr. Knapp also outlined plans for 
the World Council's Convention on 
Christian Education, to be held in 
Toronto August 10-16, 1950. As the 
American - Canadian unit of the 
World Council, the International 
Council of Religious Education voted 
to participate with about 50 other 
branches. The 22nd Quadrennial In- 
ternational Sunday School Conven- 
tion was also planned to be held dur- 
ing the 1950 World Convention. 

A project that will relate American 
Sunday school children to other Sun- 
day school pupils around the world 
was launched by the children's work- 
ers of the International Council. Dur- 
ing 1949 Sunday school groups may 
order through their denominations 
special sets of colored Bible pictures 
at $1.00 per set, to be sent to over- 
seas boys and girls. 

(Continued on page 11.) 



Page Three. 

The Christian Sun 

Established 1844 by Rev. Daniel W. Kerr. 

A Religious Weekly for the Home, devoted 
to the interests of the Kingdom as represent- 
ed by the Congregational Christian Churches. 
Our Principles. 

1. The Lord Jesus Christ is the only 
Head of the Church. 

2. Christian is a sufficient name for the 
Church. 

3. The Bible is a sufficient rule of faith 
and practice. 

4. Christian character is a sufficient test 
of fellowship and Church membership. 

5. The right of private judgment and the 
liberty of conscience is a right and a privi 
lege that should be accorded to and exer- 
cised by all. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor Robert Lee House 

Managing Editor John T. Kernodle 

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Page Four. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 24, 1949. 



THE EDITOR'S JvJXSSAGE 




CONCERNING THE PARSONAGE. 

The traditional church parsonage has been the 
butt of many jokes. It is one thing to joke about a 
grotesque, antiquated building called a parsonage; it 
is quite another thing to live in it. Many heartaches are 
bound up with faulty plumbing (or lack of plumbing), 
inadequate heating facilities, ancient furnishings, leak- 
ing roofs and streaked walls characteristic of the typical 
parsonage. 

Even today the parsonage with modern fixtures 
is the exception rather than the rule. Some ministers 
must draw heavily upon their reserves of grace and 
patience in order to cope with the limitations and de- 
ficiencies of their ecclesiastical domiciles. 

The church with a modern, adequate parsonage 
is fortunate. It evidences a healthy concern for its 
pastor and family. It has an additional advantage when 
it is. on the market for a new minister. No alibi or 
apology is necessary. 

For maximum efficiency in his parish, the minister 
needs adequate living quarters and the usual labor- 
saving devices for the home. The church is to be 
commended which makes an honest effort to provide 
these. Happily, the number is increasing. 

Churches contemplating building or remodeling 
their parsonages may receive helpful suggestion by writ- 
ing to Mr. William Kincaid Newman, 287 Fourth Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. 



'THEIR FINEST HOUR" 



History contains few utterances more dramatic than 
that of Prime Minister Winston Churchill before the 
British House of Commons, June, 1940: "The whole 
fury and might of the enemy must very soon be turned 
on us in this Island or lose the war. If we can stand 
up to him, all Europe may be free and the life of the 
whole world may move forward into broad, sunlit up- 
lands. But if we fail, then the whole world, including 
the United States, including all that we have known 
or cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age, 
made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the 
lights of perverted science. Let us therefore brace our- 
selves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the 
British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thou- 
sand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest 
hour.'" It was! 

Christians have an unparalleled opportunity in our 
generation to distinguish themselves in the cause of 
Christian unity. Great effort will be required to give 
momentum to the movement. Indifference and opposi- 
tion must be surmounted. But we have come at long 
last to the hour when a consideration of Church union 
is no longer academic. Each may strengthen or advance 
the cause in his own sphere of influence. Union must 




be promoted from the top down and from the bottom 
up. Some seed of Christian union may fall on stony 
ground, but others will fall into fertile soil and bring 
forth an abundant harvest. Therefore let us not be idle. 
We are privileged to reap where other apostles of Chris- 
tian union have sown. 

A few churchmen remarked at Cleveland that they 
would not hinder, neither would they promote the 
E. and R. Merger. What a pity! Of course, neutrality 
does not involve one in the possible consequences of 
opposition to that which may be the definite will of 
God. But a very considerable portion of our Lord's 
teaching emphasizes the truth that to neglect an oppor- 
tunity to do good is to do evil. 

It is entirely possible that a decade hence those who 
are now indifferent or opposed to our current Merger 
will remember it as their major blunder in churchman- 
ship. Christian union must become a major objective 
in our thinking, praying, studying and planning. Con- 
certed effort to this end may enable future historians to 
say, "This was our finest hour." 



MRS. B. D. JONES. 



Holy Neck Church lost a valuable member in the 
death of Mrs. Brock D. Jones. She had given many 
years of uninterrupted service in that church. Her 
husband and children found their places of usefulness 
in the same church. 

But her influence was limited by no measure to her 
local church. Her strength was relatively unabated 
with the passing of the years, thus enabling her to take 
an active interest in the work of her church on confer- 
ence, convention and national levels. Yet, she never pa- 
raded in denominational work to the neglect of her 
church and home. Sons and daughters perpetuate her 
name, spirit and work. 

In Mrs. Jones we found an increasingly rare phe- 
nomenon of our day : the mother of a large, influential, 
church-going family. The home and church offer ma- 
jor opportunities for the development of womanhood 
at its best. Mrs. Jones found life's fulfilment in these 
two important spheres. 



All my life people have been coming to me with 
plans to make over society and its institutions. Many 
of these plans have seemed to me good. Some have been 
excellent. All of them have had one fatal defect. They 
have assumed that human nature would behave in a 
certain way. If it would behave in that way these plans 
would work, but if human nature would behave in 
that way these plans would not be necessary, for in 
that case society and its institutions would reform them- 
selves. — Elihu Root. 



February 24, 1949. THE CHRISTIAN SUN 

Our Christian World_Task* 

By President Henry P. Van Dusen 
Union Theological Seminary, New York City 



I. 

On the one hand, it is possible to 
say that there has been no previous 
hour in the nineteen centuries of 
Christian history when the churches 
officiated in the International Council 
(of Religious Education) were as 
aware of Christianity as a world re- 
ality; as alive to the Christian task 
as a world task ; as ready, if not to 
face, in any event to be challenged to 
face, the titantic responsibilities of 
Christian education throughout the 
whole world. . . . Surely, no one would 
challenge the now threadbare truism 
that the most significant fact about 
Christianity in our period ... is the 
double accomplishment . . . : 

In our time, Christianity 1ms become 
for the first time, a world reality; and, 
in so doing, has become the first truly 
world movement this planet has known. 

In our time, the major Protestant 
Churches have begun to see their tasks 
as one task; and have begun so to face 
it, and to plan and work together, as 
though the Christian churches were One 
Church, truly a Body of Christ. 

Of the second of those facts, th's 
Council is one of the most signifi- 
cant manifestations. Of both facts, 
last summer's General Assembly of 
the World Council of Churches was 
both proof and symbol. 

... no event so momentous as the 
Amsterdam Assembly happens by 
chance. It is the fruit of the vision 
and dreams, the plans and labors, of 
many men over many years; and it 
possible only because of them. It is 
not an exaggeration to suggest : The 
hopes of two millenia, the prayers of 
centuries, the labors of decades, the 
intensive planning of years found 
fullfilment at Amsterdam. 

More particularly, Amsterdam 
marked the confluence of two great 
developments w i t h i n Christendom 
which have flowed down the past cen- 
tury. 

One has been the effort to carry the 
Christian Gospel to the ends of the 
earth, to establish the church in every 
land — so that Christianity might be- 
come in fact what it has always been 
in ideal — and had never been in fact 
— a world religion. 

The other has been the effort to 



*Address delivered Sunday, February 6, 
at the Ecumenical Worship Service, first ses- 
sion of the 27th annual meetings of the In- 
ternational Council of Keligious Education 
at Columbus, Ohio. 



draw together the many, diverse, sep- 
arated bodies which all claim the 
name of Christ — to think, speak, and 
act unitedly — so that the Christian 
church might become in truth what it 
had always been in profession, and 
had never been in reality — a single 
living organism, the "Body of 
Christ" . . . 

Christianity has, at long last, be- 
come a world religion. 

Thus Christianity has become, po- 
tentially, a universal faith. For, to 
be universal, it is not necessary that 
a faith shall have established itself as 
the religion of all men. It is neces- 
sary that it have demonstrated its 
power to win the spontaneous and 
convinced adherence of men and wo- 
men of every type, of every race and 
nation and class, from every kind of 
cultural background, and at every 
stage of cultural advance. In our 
time, for the first time, Christianity 
has become such a world faith. It is 
the first movement of any kind so to 
claim the allegiance of peoples of the 
whole earth. 

On the other hand, the Christian 
churches have started to become a 
living organism. 

It lias gone forward — this tidal 
movement of Christian unity — 
through many diverse channels . . . : 

In towns and cities — through as- 
sociations of Christian ministers and 
lay folk ; through u n i o n services, 
through church federations, through 
manifold collaboration. 

In coxinties and states and nations 
— through comity agreements for di- 
vision of missionary responsibility ; 
through national church councils; 
through united organizations for 
home missions, for foreign missions, 
for religious education, for Christian 
publications. Far more than those in 
the pews know, the churches are even 
now planning their work unitedly and 
executing it cooperatively. 

In lands of the youngest churches — 
hundreds of union projects — schools 
and colleges, hosnitals and theologi- 
cal seminaries ; dozens of organic 
mergers of previously separated de- 
nominations into single churches of 
Christ, transcending traditional de- 
nominational divisions. 

On the world scale — a whole nest of 
world ecumenical bodies — pointing 
up toward this, the latest and most 
important — the World Council of 



Page Five. 

Churches. One does not understand 
what was done at Amsterdam unless 
he sees the World Council as the 
copestone of a vast and intricate 
structure of Christian comity, co- 
operation and union. . . . 

So much for the hopeful aspects of 
the present situation. 

On the other hand, there has been 
no time during this modern period, 
not even the dark years of Fascist ex- 
tension, of Nazi menace, of actual 
world conflict, when the actualities 
and the prospects of world Christi- 
anity were so threatened by uncer- 
tainties, difficulties, and ominous per- 
il of worse things to come, as today. 
This year of our Lord, 1949, has 
dawned upon a world more gravely 
shadowed by apprehension than any 
"peace time" year within memory 
. . . the outlook of all mankind knows 
no easement from the overarching 
portent of World War II. 

. . . The over-all picture of the 
Christian world mission at this mo- 
ment, if we are to use the military 
metaphor, is less that of a trium- 
phant advance than of a determined 
"holding" operation. That promises 
to be its predominant character in the 
days ahead. It is no part of Chris- 
tian optimism to evade this ominous 
prospect ; as it is no part of Chris- 
tian realism to permit it to chill the 
temper of Christian confidence or cut 
the nerve of Christian effort. 

III. 

When we narrow our focus to North 
America which is, after all, your ma- 
jor concern and responsibility in this 
Council, the paradox of the world sit- v 
nation stands forth in vivid micro- 
cosm. 

On the one hand, we axe cheered 
by evidences of church health, of 
growth, of advance. We take satis- 
faction in statistics of increases in 
church memberships and church 
school attendances. . . . 

But I trust not one of us is de- 
ceived by these surface indications of 
health and vitality. Not only are 
they shadowed by ominous portents 
on every horizon of the world scene. 
Not only are they qualified by reflec- 
tions of these portents within our 
own lands — the progressive perme- 
ation of secularism, the complex of 
disturbing developments. . . . They 
are challenged also by the signs of 
stronger vitality and larger effective- 
ness within Christian groups and 
sects outside the main body of Prot- 
estantism, not represented in this 
Council. More important, these en- 
(Continued on page 13.) 



Page Six. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 24, 1949. 



I CONTRIBUTIONS 



SUFFOLK LETTER. 

Mrs. B. D. Jones, Sr., 70, Holland, 
Va., died Wednesday night (Feb. 16) 
in a Suffolk hospital after a brief ill- 
ness. Surviving are five sons: Dr. 
Darden W. Jones, Franklin, Va. ; Dr. 
Brock D. Jones, Jr., Norfolk; Elijah 
N. Jones, New York City; James 
Carlton Jones, Holland ; and William 
Thomas Jones, Franklin ; three daugh- 
ters, Mrs. John G. Truitt and Mrs. 
Ernest H. Stephenson, both of Suf- 
folk ; and Mrs. Morris W. Pierce of 
Holland; one brother, Dr. Ben W. 
Rawles of Richmond, Va. ; twelve 
grandchildren, and several nephews 
and nieces. 

Mrs. Jones was a native of Nanse- 
mond County, ' the daughter of the 
late Elisha Rawles, and Mary Eliza- 
beth Watkins awRles. She was a 
graduate of the Finney School in Suf- 
folk, and was formerly a teacher in 
the public schools of Nansemond 
County. She was active in communi- 
ty and church affairs, having served 
as district superintendent of the East- 
ern Virginia Woman's Missionary 
Conference of Congregational Chris- 
tian Churches, and later as president 
of the Conference. She was a mem- 
ber of the Holy Neck Congregational 
Christian Church and took a leading 
part in all its activities, served as 
president of the Woman's Missionary 
Aid Society, and was a teacher of a 
class in the Sunday school. 

Upon the death of her husband, 
August 18, 1939, Mrs. Jones contin- 
ued to farm and interested herself in 
community and rural improvements. 
Remaining in the old family home 
with her were one of her sons, James 
Carlton, who is connected with farm- 
ing and business interests in Nanse- 
mond County and Holland ; and one 
of her daughters, Mrs. Morris W. 
Pierce. They helped to make her last 
years happy. 

The funeral was conducted appro- 
priately at the Holy Neck Congrega- 
tional Christian Church Friday after- 
noon at 3:00 o'clock by her pastor, 
the Rev. Luther B. Grice, D. D., and 
a former pastor, the Rev. N. G. New- 
man, D. D. The tribute which Dr. 
Newman spoke was in good taste and 
beautiful. The Holy Neck choir sang. 
Dr. Grice asked me to pronounce the 
benediction at the grave. The flow- 
ers were many, and from the size of 
the congregation and the number of 



automobiles parked in all available 
space, it would seem that almost, ev- 
eryone in the community and a good- 
ly number beyond were there. One 
of the remarks made by Dr. Newman 
sticks in my mind : ' ' Few of the wo- 
en I have known had the ability to 
serve as she served, and fewer still did 
it, ' ' May I add a line : To me she 
was a noblewoman equal to every oc- 
casion and circumstance that con- 
fronted her in the rearing of eight 
children to mature manhood and wo- 
manhood. 

John G. Truitt. 



THE CHURCH OF GOD'S DESIGN. 

Since the Amsterdam Conference, 
as well as in that Conference, the 
term, "The Church of God's De- 
sign" is in the speech, and let us hope 
not just in the air — regarding the 
import of that meeting, and that 
terminology. 

There are two major emphases of 
the Amsterdam Conference which can 
not be eliminated from pulpit con- 
sideration today — doctrinal preaching 
and teaching regarding the Chris- 
tian's use of money. 

As to the former the pulpit in 
Europe is far ahead of that of the 
United States. The Barthian atti- 
tude in theology of "Let God Do It" 
is not so bad considering what we 
have done. For a generation, or 
longer now, we have been under 
' ' Stirrer - Uppers ' ' and evangelistis 
"crying aloud in the streets," who 
claim to represent Him "whose voice 
was not lifted up in the street," En- 
deavoring to make us believe that 
greater physical activity, and more of 
our "good work" — their interpreta- 
tion, of course, would bring us into 
the Kingdom of God and the King- 
dom of God into us. God does not 
seem to be in a hurry ! Jesus was not 
in a hurry. His ministry did not last 
over a long time. He did not seem 
to be nearly so anxious to "get things 
done" as to be doing them. For God 
is! And the Kingdom of God is com- 
ing. There are those to whom its 
coming seems imperceptible ; but his- 
tory does not miss recording events 
which prove its coming. 

Another emphasis of that Confer- 
ence was on the Christian's use of 
money. Perhaps in no act of Chris- 
tian behavior have we been more re- 



miss than in the just use of money. 
The United States has come to be fab- 
ulously and perhaps notoriously rich 
in money. However, this great wealth 
has never been justly allocated as its 
use and needs demand. 

Persons and families of great 
wealth have given to colleges, set up 
foundations, erected hospitals and 
given great gifts to other worthy 
needs and institutions. To these don- 
ors are due real and hearty encom- 
ium. That way and means of helping 
mankind is commendable. Still, we 
face the fact that actual needs, even 
demands, increase more rapidly than 
giving increases. Witness now the 
call from colleges, small and great, 
asking for from one million to fifty 
millions increase in endowment, which 
increased demand upon college work 
make necessary. It is refreshing' to 
remember now, with no discount of 
the work done by great State Uni- 
versities, that the call comes from the 
colleges raised up and supported by 
"gifts" from Christian people. It is 
not to be forgot that those who then 
gave, and have continued to give had 
in mind what Bach so well expressed, 
1 ' Lord, what I have is only thy gift. ' ' 

Members of Christian churches 
whose incomes have remained in low- 
er and middle-class brackets, have not 
so much become noted for increased 
and more liberal giving, and support 
of Christian institutions. One major 
tenet of the Christian religion is, that 
money used for the work of foreign 
missions pays in good returns, in fav- 
orable sentiment, mutual respect and 
in conversion to the Christian way of 
life. Let's exalt God and His doc- 
trine of salvation in our pulpit work, 
and as well in the Christian grace of 
giving, ' ' as God has prospered us. ' ' 
H. Russell Clem, 
Burlington, N. C. 



Dr. Albert D. S'tauffacher and Dr. 
Wofford C. Timmons, both of New 
York City, nationally known Congre- 
gational Christian Churchmen, sailed 
Monday, February 21, from Los An- 
geles, California, on the S. S. Lurline 
for an intensive six weeks' speaking 
and conference mission among the 
churches of the Hawaiian Islands. 
They will present the call of missions 
and evangelism. "The 'Big Three' 
in our world today are not atomic 
bombs, death germs and supersonic 
speed, or Stalin, Bevin and Truman, 
but, among the common people of the 
world the 'Big Three' are faith, hope 
and love," said Dr. Stauffacher on the 
eve of sailing". 



February 24, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Seven. 



News of Elon College 



By President L. E. Smith 



APPORTIONMENT GIVING. 

The financial obligations of Elon 
College are not very different to those 
of any other institution or business. 
That is, we have certain bills that 
must be paid on the first and fif- 
teenth of each month. Faculty sal- 
aries are paid on a monthly basis. 
For the institution to maintain its 
standing and efficiency all such bills 
must be met promptly. 

There are different sources of in- 
come from which the college may re- 
ceive funds for current demands. The 
church has always felt an obligation 
to assist in the support of its college. 
Fortunately, it has a definite plan 
and a very acceptable system for 
lending its support. Each church 
and Sunday school is expected to 
make contributions quarterly or more 
frequently. The total amount to be 
paid for the ensuing conference year 
is given to each church by its con- 
ference at the beginning of the con- 
ference year. These frequent or in- 
frequent contributions are supposed 
to total that amount. The amount ap- 
portioned to the churches for 1950 is 
approximately 20 per cent increase 
over last year's apportionment. Due 
to the comparatively small amount 
apportioned to the churches for the 
college it is sincerely hoped that all 
churches will accept this small in- 
crease apportioned for the college 
and make their payments accordingly. 
The church has been very faithful in 
its support and the college is most 
appreciative. 

Churches. 

Previously reported $ 906.44 

Eastern N. C. Conference: 
Pope's Chapel S. S 5.00 

Eastern Va. Conference : 

Newport News 400 - 00 

Spring Hill S. S 2 - 43 

N. C. & Va. Conference : 
Hines Chapel S. S H- 10 

Western N. C. Conference: 

Flint Hill S. S -76 

Pleasant Grove 5.00 

Spoon's Chapel 2-49 

Va. Valley Conference : 

Antioch S. S 10.64 

Bethel S. S 15.86 

Linville 12.38 

Total $ 465.66 

Grand total $1,372.10 



A CHURCH IS BORN. 

[Extracts from speech at the Mid-Win- 
ter Meeting by Rev. Kenneth E. Seim, 
Minister of the Colonial Church of Edina, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota.] 

We were overjoyed when at our 
first worship service, which was held 
in the local school on March 31, 87 
worshippers were present. A week 
later the Sunday school was started 
with five pupils and three teachers. 
Two months later on June 9 we were 
organized as a church and on Novem- 
ber 3, when we closed our charter 
membership rolls we had 135 mem- 
bers. At present our membership is 
just under 300 and our Sunday school 
has an enrollment of 153. All this 
growth has taken place while we are 
still meeting in the school. We have 
high hopes of being able to move into 
our new church next month. 

If there is anything unique and dif- 
ferent in our situation it is the way 
the men of the church have taken 
hold and made things go. We are 
making our own pews and chancel 
furniture. A wooden -cross was made 
by a member who is Superintendent 
of Streets in our little village. Offer- 
ing plates have been made by a young 
dentist and I defy anyone to tell any 
of these pieces from the best that 
Whittemore Associates or the Ameri- 



can Seating Co. put out. This same 
young dentist made the crowing roost- 
er which is to be placed on our church 
steeple. A retired school teacher made 
a beautiful beaten copper book hold- 
er for the official membership roll of 
the church, a book plate for our hymn 
books was cut by one of the men, etc. 
I could go on and name a dozen other 
things which we will build ourselves 
in the future. 

Mr. Seim then gave some striking 
examples of the power of the Chris- 
tian faith to transform lives and to 
bring into active participation in the 
church young men and women who 
heretofore have found no place for 
the church in their lives. One such 
young professional man was a spark 
plug in raising the $20,000 needed to 
start building a church. 

Continuing Mr. Seim said, ' ' The 
work is truly needed in the area. It 
is a missionary field. One is sur- 
prised at the adults that have never 
been baptized, to say nothing' of be- 
longing to a church. I have baptized 
more adults on this field in three years 
than in all my other parishes com- 
bined ! The area is growing in leaps 
and bounds. It is the second fastest 
growing area in Minneapolis and the 
surrounding suburbs. And that young 
families are moving into the area is 
attested to by the fact that we have 
52 children on our Cradle Roll. 



The Elon College Choir will appear 
at Newport News Friday evening of 
this week, at Suffolk Sunday morning 
and at the Norfolk Temple Sunday 



evening. 



STANDAART ORGAN CO., Inc. 

BUILDERS OF FINE CHURCH PIPE ORGANS 
Suffolk, Virginia P. O. Box 696 

We gladly submit estimates and drawings for a new 
"Standaart" organ without any obligation on your part. 

• 

When building a new church, we will be only too 
glad to cooperate with your architects in designing the 
organ chambers, without any charge to you. 

• 

All our instruments are custom-built and guaranteed 
for a period of twenty years. 

Contact our service department for a yearly main- 
tenance contract for/or restoration of your present organ. 

• 

Builders of the four-manual Cathedral Organ in Main 
Street Methodist Church, Suffolk, Virginia. 



Nothing relieves and ventilates the 
mind like a resolutions. — Burroughs. 



- Ml ; ' IM Milllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



inniiii iiiniiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mi iii? 



Page Eight. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 24, 1949. 




LETTER FROM THE JACKSONS. 

American Board Mission, 
Shaowu, Pukien, China, 
February 3, 1949. 
Dear Friends: 

January lias passed so rapidly I 
hardly know where it has gone. Over 
and through all, like an eagle hover- 
ing over its prey, has lingered the 
thought of the critical national sit- 
uation. The question now seems to be 
"What will Communist China be 
like?" 

Shortly after Christmas, a letter 
came from Yankou asking me (Dick) 
to come down to conduct a com- 
munion and baptismal service. Mid- 
winter is no time to travel on a rice 
boat I soon discovered. I was cold 
enough anyway but when T saw the 
boatman climb down into that icy 
water to move the boat off the rocks, I 
had a sympathetic chill. After three 
days and two nights, we arrived at 
Yankou (80 miles )to find that re- 
cently half of the city had been 
destroyed by fire (the business sec- 
tion). Rumors attributed the blaze 
to Communists but there was no evi- 
dence to prove it. 

The service on the first Sunday 
morning in 1949 was a thrilling one 
for me. It was the first time I had 
baptized Chinese Christians. There 
were ten adults and ten babies. They 
had been prepared for baptism by the 
local preacher, Mr. Lin, who is not 
yet ordained. Two of the candidates, 
both old men, spoke a different dialect 
so that all had to be interpreted to 
them in another brand of Chinese. I 
had carefully prepared the service 
before leaving. Shaowu and it was 
mimeographed. We followed the same 
service in the Pilgrim Hymnal which 
many of you use when you observe 
the Lords' Supper. 

The Chinese Christians, in adopting 
the sacrament of Communion, have 
found it necessary to make some mod- 
ifications. In the first place, no grape 
juice is available so sugar water is 
used (this is also used for feasts as 
many Christians do not drink wine). 
Secondly, bread is not available in the 
shops of the smaller towns so a type 
of unfrosted sponge cake is used. In 



South China the staff of life is rice 
and I personally think something 
made from rice would be far more 
appropriate for communion but such 
is the custom. We all know that the 
important thing in the observance of 
the Lord's Supper is not the physical 
elements but the spiritual fellowship 
with one another and with our risen 
Lord. 

As we shared this common meal in 
commemoration of the Lord's last 
supper with his disciples, the feeling 
of the Oneness of all peoples came to 
me. Although, at first, we were prone 
to notice the differences between East- 
ern and Western customs and habits, 
we now are beginning to see a bit 
more deeply; we can see that we have 
more similarities than differences and 
that we humans are essentially alike 
— in our strengths and in our weak- 
nesses. The color of our skins, the 
slant of our eyes may vary but in the 
inward man, we are One. Most na- 
tions and peoples will give lip serv- 
ice to the idea of the Unity of man- 
kind, yet men go on killing, fighting 
and destroying. We who are Chris- 
tians must pledge ourselves anew to 
bring to pass this peace and under- 
standing, this common unity which 
we feel so deeply as we partake of the 
Lords' supper. 

One fact is evident to us. The 
common people of China, just as the 
common people of Amerca, do not 
want war. There is hardly a prayer 
I have heard which does not include a 
petition for peace. The Chinese sel- 
dom volunteer for military service. 
Draftees are rounded up in the coun- 
try, chained together, and marched 
back to town to serve in the army. 
One of the reasons Generalissimo 
Chang fell from power so quickly, I 
believe, is because all he promised 
was Avar which nobody wants. I feel 
just as sure that if we questioned the 
common people of Russia or Holland, 
the same result would be found. 
When will the leaders of the world 
give up their mistaken ideas of mili- 
tary supremacy and might and listen 
to the voices of the people which uni- 
versally say, "We are One people, 
basically alike, and our only desire is 



to live in peace with one another." 
As I gave the bread and the cup that 
cold January morning to more than 
one hundred of our Chinese brothers 
— to the farmer, his skin wrinkled by 
exposure and bitter toil ; to the labor- 
er who literally carries on his back 
the loads of mankind ; to the mothers 
who work from dawn to dark to look 
after their families — my mind was 
consumed with these thoughts of our 
common unity symbolically expressed 
in this service. 

After several days in Yankou, I 
went on down to Nanping where Dr. 
Ed and Prances Riggs were waiting 
with the truck. They had been down 
to Foochow. We made the trip back 
in one day (125 miles ) just in time to 
begin preparing for Lunar New Year 
(January 28), the event of the year 
for the Chinese. 

As part of the New Year celebra- 
tion, I have been helping Pastor 
Huang with a series of evangelistic 
services using slides. The church has 
been packed full as usual when slides 
are shown. Several ushers have been 
planted in the crowds to keep the 
noise to a minimum and the results 
have been very good. I made a sim- 
ple copying stand with which we are 
able to take pictures of Chinese char- 
acters and mottoes for use in preach- 
ing. My portable generator (pur- 
chased with some of the money given 
us by Southern Convention friends 
before we left the United States, puts 
out electric current (350 watts) for 
seven hours on a gallon of gasoline. 
As soon as the road to Kienning is 
repaired, we hope to be able to take 
trips into the country, using the 
truck, the generator and slides for 
our evangelistic and public health 
work. 

Dorothy is enjoying a brief vaca- 
tion from her teaching during the hol- 
idays. Lewis is growing daily and is 
developing a will and mind of his 
own. They join me in sending our 
love and greetings. 

Cordially, 

Dick Jackson. 



Twenty dollars still buys a ton of 
coal — delivered — to heat a mission 
school or hospital in China. It still 
pays tuition for a promising student 
at Union High School, Foochow. It 
still makes a hospital bed available for 
a needy patient for almost a month. 
It still buys enough rice to feed a pas- 
tor 's family in Shaowu for three 
weeks. Twenty dollars — the cost of 
Christmas Day in most of our homes 
— can help bring Our Christian World 
Mission to life. 



February 24, 1949. 



Page Nine. 



Church Women at Work 

With Emphasis on Missions 

Mrs. W. J. Andes, Editor 
637 S. Sunset Drive, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



THE WORLD AT PRAYER. 

By Florence Gordon, Editorial Ass't 
Foreign Missions 'Conference of 
North America. 

Two little Indian boys in New Mex- 
ico hurried to school in starched 
white shirts; this was an important 
day. Fourteen women braved the 
swollen waters of Cranks Creek, Ken- 
tucky, to get to the Community Cen- 
ten. Sunset Gap, Tennessee, had icy 
roads, but a congregation gathered to 
"touch hands around the rolling 
world." At Tucson, Arizona, there 
were representatives of seventeen In- 
dian tribes, besides Spanish-speaking 
people and "Anglos." Among the 
Navajo Indians at Ganado, a speak- 
ing choir of children had practiced 
for three weeks to take part in the 
service. Up in Alaska, cottage prayer 
meetings went on at Sitka from six 
in the morning until midnight; at 
Haines, a former opera singer came 
over from Port Chilkroot to sing Ma- 
lotte's "The Lord's Prayer" and a 
friend sent a blossoming plant. 

It was the World Day of Prayer. 
To millions the first Friday in Lent 
has come to have connotations : The 
World Day of Prayer. Traditionally, 
on the first Friday in Lent, Christians 
the world around unite in prayer for 
home and foreign missions. They keep 
the Day in the heart of Africa, in the 
frozen reaches of Baffin Land, in the 
bustling port cities of Latin America, 
in isolated villages of the Orient, as 
well as in thousands of communities 
in the United States and Canada. The 
service for the Day of Prayer finds its 
way into the walls of institutions ; the 
sick, the aged, the blind, the resi- 
dents in leper camps and tuberculosis 
sanatoriums, all share in the observ- 
ance. Children .ioin in the chorus of 
praise and petition businesswomen set 
their noon hour apart for corporate 
worship ; groups of young people 
meet at night to pray together. There 
is no barrier of language, nor of dis- 
tance, of color or creed ; on the World 
Day of Prayer all make a common 
approach to the Father. Begun bv 
one denomination in 1887, the World 
Day of Prayer has come over the 
years to be perhaps the greatest 
single unifying force among all Chris- 
tian women everywhere. 



Long in advance, the Foreign Mis- 
sions Conference of North America 
mails the program, which has been 
prepared by the World Day of Prayer 
Committee of the United Council of 
Church Women, a group of women of 
several races and nationalities, to over 
seventy countries around the world, 
to be adapted and translated there, 
and distributed to the people in time 
for the Day. The Home Missions 
Council of North America and the 
home mission boards distribute the 
program to their home mission fields. 
The program on the uniform theme, 
"The Lord Is My Keeper," went 
overseas by airmail in July, 1948, for 
the commoT World Day of Prayer, 
March 4, 1949. Tn at least two coun- 
tries, India and China, correlation 
and extension of the World Day of 
Prayer observances has been made an 
integral part of the work of the Na- 
tional Christian Councils. Other lands 
have special committees which dis- 
tribute the progi'ams, administer the 
offerings, and gather up the accounts 
of the local services. When these re- 
ports are relayed to the Foreign Mis- 
sions Conference each year, and add- 
ed to those collected by the Home Mis- 
sions Council and the denominations 
from within the United States and its 
possessions, they furnish a colorful, 
kaleidoscopic picture of worshippers 
of all races and nationalities in the 
Christian fellowship. 

Nashville, Tennessee, had a city- 
Avide service in a downtown church, 
but was able to draw on students of 
Scarritt College for Christian Work- 
ers from some twenty overseas lands 
to make the world fellowship real and 
close. 

Frances De Pauw School of Los 
Ana'eles (Methodist), which has girls 
of Mexican, Cuban and other Central 
American backgrounds, as well as 
Chinese and Indians, maintained a 
hvelve hour vigil of prayer. Each 
girl spent ten minutes at the altar, 
not leaving it till another girl ar- 
rived. At the close, the girls and 
staff all came together and followed 
the special children's World Day of 
Prayer program. 

Flandreau, South Dakota, South 
Indian Vocational High School runs 
a garment factory in which some 



twenty Indian women and girls make 
garments for hospitals and schools 
throughout the whole Indian Service. 
Still sitting at their machines, they 
stopped very informally at noon-day 
to pray. 

The World Day of Prayer was 
broadcast last year over the weekly 
chapel hour of the hospital at Ta- 
coma Indian Mission Center, Tacoma. 
Washington. The ambulant patients 
crowded into the superintendent 's of- 
fice, where the broadcast originated, 
and the bed patients listened in with 
their headphones. 

It is a lesson in geography, anthro- 
pology, linguistics, horticulture, as 
well as in the ecumenical movement, 
to read the reports that come in from 
all parts of the world. February 13 
was one of the hottest days of the 
season, with many of the people still 
away at summer resorts. It was a 
day with two feet of snow on the 
ground, and absentees still away at 
the trapping camps. It came in the 
middle of the rainy season, but people 
would not be kept away. It came in 
the middle of the Chinese New Year 
celebration but Christians made it a 
part of the celebration. Flowering- 
pi nm. narcissi and Chinese lilies dec- 
orated the churches in China ; in Ha- 
vanna, "we had our Spanish service 
in the patio out in the shade of flam- 
boyant trees." In Tasmania and 
Queensland, Australia, there weire 
services in the cathedral; in the little 
red church at Jobat, South India, 
fifty Bhil women sat on mats on the 
floor while one of them led the service 
in Hindi. Tn Madras, Miss Dorothy 
Brockway, the principal of St. Chris- 
topher's Training College, one of the 
eight union colleges in the Orient 
which receive a share of the World 
Day of Prayer offerings, told the Ta- 
mil and Telugu students of the World 
Day of Prayer service which she ad- 
dressed in 1947 in snow-bound Har- 
risburg, Pennsylvania. 

At Tehran they said the Lord's 
Prayer in fourteen tongues. In Lima, 
Peru, a Chinese woman offered prayer 
who had often taken part in the serv- 
ices in her homeland. In Athens, the 
program was translated into Greek by 
a medical student. The stencils for 
mimeographing it were cut by a typ- 
ist who refused any pay. A blind 
pastor and his wife made an Armen- 
ian translation; both Greek and Ar- 
menian versions were handed out in 
the churches of Athens and Piraeus 
the week before, so that worshippers 
could prepare their hearts. 

Two preliminary meetings Avere 
(Continued on page 14.) 



Page Ten. THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



FOR THE CHILDREN 

Mrs. R. L. House, Editor 



Dear Boys and Girls : 

Do you behave well when you are 
in the Sunday school building or 
church? I hope so. I have seen 
youngsters swarming down the aisles, 
over the pulpit, jumping over the 
benches and pews, banging on the 
piano, racing up the stairs. Have 
you ? I know that it is very hard to 
be still and to be quiet, but in God's 
house it is the thing to do. For 
grownups, too. I don't think they 
should smoke anywhere in the church 
building. That doesn't mean that 
we can't play, have fun and enjoy 
ourselves. 

All noise and play gets tiresome 
just as all quiet and sit-so-very-still 
does. What to do then ? Walk quiet- 
ly or run with light steps. Practice 
on the piano at home! If you don't 
have one, then you don't need to prac- 
tice at all. Do mind the teacher when 
she says to sit or stand. I know that 
yon won't feel like it sometimes but 
she usually has a good reason ! 

God made the night so we could 
rest ourselves and our eyes. People 
who have visited in the far north 
countries of Europe where the sun 
only sets for a short while each night, 
say that it hurts their eyes and gets 
them out of their sleeping habits. So 
they have come to call those places 
"The Land of the Midnight Sun." 
God made the night for quiet time. 
Man made churches for quiet time. 
There, we can think about God the 
loving Father, and be quiet and feel 
restful. Not when you are little, but 
as you grow older yon will begin to 
feel the calm and ease of being in 
church. 

It is easier to be noisy and cause 
trouble when you are with a crowd. 
A bunch of boys have fun teasing 
their teacher, a group of girls may 
giggle and giggle. You don't have to 
be very good or very bad. Just be 
yourself. 

When you go to Sunday school do 
these things. Try to be on time. You 
may miss a special treat if you are 
very late. Take off your coat or hat 
if the teacher asks you, take your 
money but keep it in your pocket or 
some safe place where it won't roll 
on the floor. Help if the teacher 
calls for you and be ready to sing, 
play or whatever. 

Just for a little while once a week 



we have an opportunity to be together 
in God's house. Let's make it a hap- 
py time. If you like to show off, for- 
get it ! The teacher has seen many 
show-offs, stand-offs and — you know 
what brings you the most happiness. 
Be glad that you aren't living in the 
time of the Puritans and have to sit 
through two- or three-hour sermons ! 

If you have trouble remembering 
all these things, why don't you ask 
your mother or dad to help you re- 
member? You can talk it over on 
the way to church. 

Should you be very bad and the 
teacher speaks to your mother aboiit 
what you did, be brave, face up and 
try to do better. Grownups do love 
little folks and because they were 
once little, they know how hard be- 
ing "good" can be. There is a word 
that tell us about happy times at 
home, school or church. It is coopera- 
tion. 

P. S. to Mothers: Jesus came that 
men might learn to love and live with 
one another. It is the first task of 
the teacher — to have happy boys and 
girls in accord. It is the major task 
of the home. Perfection in emotion- 
al behavior is never reached but in 
spite of the warnings of "frustra- 
tions" and "behaviorism" the par- 
ent must take as a prime duty the 
training of the child to obey the laws 
of God and man. "I don't wanna" 
can make wars, ruin a civilization and 
prevent church union ! 



WHEN JEERY DID NOT COME 
HOME. 

By Janette Stevenson Murray. 
(American Mother for 1947.) 
Issued by the National Kindergarten 
Association. 

"May I go to play with Jack?" 
inquired four-year-old Jerry. 

"Oh, he lives too far aAvay," an- 
swered his mother. 

' ' I 've been there lots of times with 
the other boys ; I know the way." 

"Will you come back at noon, 
promptly, when the children come 
from school ? ' ' 

"Yes, I'll come." 

So Jerry went to Jake's — over the 
hill, four blocks away. His mother 
telephoned to be sure he had arrived, 
and Jack's mother promised to send 
him home at noon. She did send him 
but he failed to appear. 



February 24, 1949. 

After a while Jerry's elder brother 
went out to search for him, and then 
his mother went out, but neither of 
them found any .trace of the child. 
Later, his mother telephoned to the 
homes where she thought he might 
have gone, but she could find no one 
who had seen him. It was an anxious 
time, and Dad was out of town. Moth- 
er feared Jerry had gone off with 
some stranger; he was a sociable boy, 
exactly the type to attract outsiders. 
His brown eyes usually sparkled with 
enthusiasm and, as his aunt said, he 
"radiated personality." 

At about two o'clock Jerry saunt- 
ered in. "Where have you been?" 
Mother demanded. 

It seemed he had gone to the park 
and had played with some boys un- 
til school time and then, after loiter- 
ing about the animal cages, he had 
come home a long, roundabout way. 

Mother refrained from comment 
until Jerry had eaten his lunch. Then 
she said, "You will have to be pun- 
ished ; you broke your promise. This 
is very serious. You will have either 
to stay in the yard for a week or else 
to give lip your desserts for a week. 
You may choose. ' ' 

' ' I choose to give up desserts, ' ' he 
answered in a low tone. 

"There will be some very nice des- 
serts, and you will be obliged to eat 
certain foods that you don't like so 
well to take their place." 

"I know ; but it will be better than 
to stay at home for a whole week. 
I would be dreadful not to go out on 
the street for so long." 

It was hard to have to punish him 
— he was so manly about it — and all 
Mother's worry and anger had dis- 
appeared before the punishment be- 
gan, but she persisted. He cried just 
a little on two occasions, but he did 
not seem at all resentful. 

Mother, very carefully, explained 
to him twice — before the punishment 
began and after it had ended — that he 
must either come right home when 
she expected him or have someone 
telephone to her. She told him she 
must always know his whereabouts. 
He realized the punishment was just, 
and it evidently made a strong im- 
pression on him, for since then he has 
never failed to come home on time or 
else to let his mother know the rea- 
son. He learned, also, to make few 
promises and to keep those he did 
make. 



Be not apt to relate news, if you 
know not the truth thereof. 

— George Washington. 



February 24, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Eleven. 



NOW IS NOT THE TIME TO QUIT 
IN THE NEAR EAST. 

By Luther R. Fowle, 
Istanbul., Turkey. 

No sooner did the American Colo- 
nies successfully break their political 
ties with Britain, then American mer- 
chants and traders sent out their fast 
sailing ships to China, the Indian 
Ocean, and the Mediterranean in 
search of profitable commerce. 

The second American Agency to 
reach overseas made itself so strongly 
felt in New England, that within 25 
years of our independence the Gen- 
eral Court of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts had chartered the 
American Board of Commissioners 
for Foreign Missions, a corporate ex- 
pression of concern and spiritual re- 
sponsibility for all the children of 
men, of whatever race or creed. 

In as early a time as that Business 
and the Church knew instinctively 
that our world was One W orld. How 
much more clearly we see it today at 
the cost of millions of lives and bil- 
lions of treasure. 

The first task of our American 
Board missionaries in the Ottoman 
Empire in 1820 was to seek fellowship 
with the great Eastern churches and 
their people. The proud Moslem then 
felt himself immeasurably superior 
to the Christian and in many ways 
he was. The "Christian" he knew 
was the oppressed representatives of 
races of long history belonging to the 
Orthodox Greek and the Armenian 
Gregorian Churches which for many 
years had been in a period of spirit- 
ual and intellectual eclipse. 

So Americans learned the lan- 
guages of the Near East — Albanian, 
Bulgarian, modern Greek, Turkish, 
Arabic — and in all of these grammars 
were written, a literature built up. 
the Bible translated, schools started — 
in short the darkness of post-Crusade 
Christianity in the Middle East be- 
gan to show new light. Until 1914, 
some 25,000 students were in schools 
operated by or supervised from 
American Board Mission stations. 
Meanwhile a dozen hospitals with 
American doctors and nurses were 
carrying on their work throughout 
the land. Inevitably these activities 
had a substantial influence not only 
on the people directly touched, but on 
the thinking and development of ev- 
ery race in the land. 

The defeat of Germany and Tur- 
key in 1918 brought about the col- 
lapse of the Ottoman Empire and the 
loss of all the Arab lands to the south. 
Under the leadership of Musafa Ke- 



mal Ataturk there arose from the 
ruins a vigorous Turkish National Re- 
public seeking a new life in terms of 
Western democracy. With this new 
Republic began a new relationship. 
The political, social and cultural re- 
forms which have been carried 
through in 25 years are well known. 
American schools are crowded with 
Turkish youth and we can take in 
only about one-third of those who 
apply. 

But Turkey's task is immeasurably 
burdened by the stern nece ssity of 
2}rotecting her frontiers against which 
Soviet Russia presses, both in the 
Caucasus and along the Bulgarian 
frontier of European Turkey. We in 
distant America cannot appreciate 
that pressure. Yet to every Soviet 
suggestion of ceding Turkish prov- 
inces, or accepting Russian help in 
holding the Bosphorus or the Darde- 
nells Turkey has said, "No." So to- 
day this Turkish Republic holds the 
the central bastion which alone seems 
to prevent Soviet Russia from de- 
scending to the Mediterranean, out- 
flanking Greece and Italy, controlling 
Suez and the Arab lands and their 
essential oil. Turkey took this stand 
unhesitatingly in 1945, when none 
stood with her. 

It is altogether fitting that we of 
America, in our own interest as well 
as that of Turkey and all non-Soviet 
lands, are now aiding Turkey in her 
road and transport systems, in har- 
bor improvement, and in equipment 
essential to the protection of her bor- 
ders. 

The money spent through Ameri- 
can educational and mission enter- 
prises is the most economical Ameri- 
can money spent in Turkey. For 
school tuitions find other income in- 
side Turkey is far larger than the 
funds from America expended in 
these activities. In fact, since the 
American Board began its work in 
Turkey in 1820, it has expended 
American funds to the end of 1947 in 
the sum of $12,900,793. 

It is interesting to note that the 
Navy Department is discussing' the 
construction of a super-airplane car- 
rier, to cost $124,000,000. One such 
ship is to cost ten times the sum spent 
from America in 128 years, in the 
endeavor to make known to all the 
people of the former Ottoman Em- 
pire the spirit and true foundations 
of Western deocracy, the value of the 
individual, the importance of his ed- 
ucation and responsibility. Mission 
representatives who have come to re- 
spect and love the peoples of these 
lands, whose languages and cultures 



they know, never dreamed that their 
labors might have wide significance 
for war or peace. Yet who can deny 
the part that these friendly messen- 
gers from the west have had, in the 
position iioav taken and bravely held 
by Turkey, in the wide struggle be- 
tween the totalitarian and free 
worlds. 

Now is not the time to quit. Tur- 
key is sending vastly increased num- 
bers of her young men and women to 
study here in the west. They will re- 
turn, to strengthen the currents of 
democratic thought, and responsible 
public opinion. Let us not fail the 
sorely straightened lands of Europe 
who have been our partners against 
oppression and autocracy, as they 
painfully grope their way back to 
economic security, political stability 
and the better life that each and all 
seek. 



COUNCIL OF RELIGIOUS EDU- 
CATION MEETS. 
(Continued from page 3.) 

Completed Bible Version 
Due in 1952. 
Prominent in the Council's discus- 
sion of future plans was the an- 
nouncement that the completed Re- 
vised Standard Version of the Bible 
will be published in the fall of 1952. 
The New Testament was issued in 
1946. Dr. Weigle, chairman of the 
Standard Bible Committee, will give 
his entire time to the Old Testament 
revision after his retirement from 
Yale Divinity School next June. The 
introduction of the completed version 
is to be timed with a nation-wide ob- 
servance during Religious Education 
Week of 1952. 

Toward. Japanese Democracy. 
The last address on the week's pro- 
gram was given by Dr. Paul H. Vieth, 
former religious education consultant 
to General MacArthur's staff in Ja- 
pan. 

"The Japanese are interested in 
everything western, including Chris- 
tianity," Dr. Vieth said. "This rep- 
resents a strategic opporunity for us 
to practice our doctrines of good will 
and service. Japan wants to re- 
establish its economy. Unless we help 
her do so we will injure the chances 
for the establishment of a democracy 
like that of the Western nations which 
have presumed to teach Japan the 
ways of peace and plenty." 



Every difficulty slurred over will 
be a ghost to disturb your respose 
later on. — Chopin. 



Page Twelve. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 24, 1949. 



Sunday School Lesson 

By Rev. H. S. Hardcastle, D. D. 



PARABLES OF JESUS. 

Lesson X — March 6, 1949. 

Memory Selection: Do not be de- 
ceived; God is not mocked; what- 
soever a man sows, that will he also 
reap. — Galatians 6 :7. 

Lesson : Mark 4 ; Luke 15 :ll-24. 

Devotional Reading : Matthew 1 3 : 
10-17. 

The World's Greatest Story 
Teller. 

Jesus was undoubtedly the world's 
greatest story teller. That is perhaps 
one of the main reasons why the com- 
mon people heard Him gladly — He 
told stories, and He told them well, 
superlatively well. He would take a 
great religious truth, sometimes some- 
thing that was quite abstract, or some- 
thing that would be unintelligible to 
untutored and ordinary people, and 
put it in the form of a parable or a 
story, and thus help them to get the 
meaning of what He said. That is if 
they really wanted to know the mean- 
ing. For Jesus Himself recognized 
that His stories concealed rather than 
revealed the truth to some folks. And 
He was repeatedly exhorting men to 
take heed how they heard, to give at- 
tention to hearing. The main point 
is that Jesus taught many things by 
parables, which is another way of 
saying that He taught by what in 
many instances were simply stories. 
Religious leaders do well when they 
use the story as a form of teaching 
effe tively. 

Seme Stories of the Kingdom of 
Heaven. 

"Whereunto shall we liken the 
kingdom of God ? ( >r with what com- 
parison shall we compare it?" Jesus 
asked. He knew that it would do lit- 
tle good to answer the question with 
some theological, abstract term — the 
folks would not know what He was 
talking about. He therefore proceed- 
ed to put the thing which they did 
not know in terms of things which 
they did know, He spoke to them in 
parables, He told them stories. 

For instance He told the story of 
the sower who went forth to sow the 
seed for his crops. With a few bold 
strokes he pictures the man as he scat- 
ters the seed for and wide across the 
broad acres, or perhaps more specifi- 
cally over the smaller plot. Some of 



the seed fell on the hard, well-beaten 
path that ran between the plots of 
ground, and which took the place of 
fences as boundary lines, and lying 
there on top of the ground the birds 
quickly ate them up. Other seed fell 
in good soil, but it was simply a thin 
layer of dirt on the hard limestone 
beneath and although it sprang up, 
it had no root and quickly faded away 
and died when the sun's rays struck 
it. Other seed also fell in good 
ground and actually sprang up and 
grew rather well, but the thorns and 
weeds of the plot eventually choked 
the life out of the tender young 
plants. Some of the seed fell on good 
ground and not only grew up, but 
came to fruition. But, even this seed 
brought forth varying yields. There, 
said the Master, we have a picture of 
what happens to the word of God 
when sowed in human hearts. Some 
of it never takes root and is lost, some 
of it does show feeble signs of growth, 
hut the life has no root or depth. 
Other seed take root and give promise 
of bearing fruit, but alas the things 
of the world choke out the life. But 
all is not loss. Some of the seed fall 
on good ground and it bears fruit, in 
varying quantities to be sure, but the 
point is that it bears fruit. Let a 
man think over that simple story and 
he will begin to get the point, he will 
see the truth therein embedded. There 
are of course other points in the story, 
hut one is best prepared to interpret 
a parable when he looks for the main, 
central truth, rather than to make the 
thing walk on all fours, make every 
detail a main point- 
There is the story of how the king- 
dom grows. It is like a man who 
plants seed, and tends to the growing 
crop, but after all the life process is 
a mystery to him. "It grows, he 
knows not how. ' ' The kingdom grows 
gradually. It has inner life and vi- 
tality. Man may, and must do his 
part, but it is God who gives the in- 
crease. Man is not to bring in the 
kingdom by his work. He can help 
by his cooperation. 

The kingdom seemed so small in 
Jesus' day, even as it may seem small 
in our day. Well, it is like a grain of 
mustard seed, which is the smallest of 
all seed, or at least it was in compari- 
: on with other seed in Jesus' day. 
But great things from little things 



grow. A mustard seed, small as it 
was, could become a great herb or 
tree which coluld give shelter to the 
birds and sanctuary for their nests. 
Despise not the day of small begin- 
nings. Mighty oaks from tiny acorns 
grow. 

It should be noted that Jesus em- 
phasized, by repetition, the vitality of 
the inner forces of the kingdom. The 
words, like seed, have tremendous vi- 
tality and life-giving power. Ideas 
are dynamic and transforming. The 
kingdom of God is not meat and 
drink, but power. 

A Story About Two Sons. 

The lesson for today is related to 
Temperance .Sunday. The Lesson 
Committee therefore wisely chose por- 
tions of Scripture which deal with 
sowing and reaping. The parables or 
stories presented above presented it 
in the field of the physical world. 
The other story given presents it in 
the world of persons. It is the well- 
known and well-loved story of the 
Prodigal Son and of the Elder Broth- 
er. Here indeed is a living story, 
drawn out in flesh and blood of the 
inevitable and the inexorable relation 
between sowing and reaping. The 
Prodigal Son shows self - expression 
gone to its logical limits, the ultimate 
reaping of the whirlwind because one 
had sown to the wind. There is a 
tragic element in the picture of that 
boy far away from home, feeding 
swine and eating the same husks that 
the swine themselves ate. But there 
is something thrilling in the picture 
of him "coming to himself" and aris- 
ing and going unto bis father with 
penitence in his heart and confession 
on his lips. This storv does concern 
sowing and reaping. But it concerns 
something even more infinitely deep 
and precious. It shows God's heart 
toward His erring children, His grace 
to those who have failed who in peni- 
tence turn to Him. That is why the 
story is immortal. 

Then of course there is the ugly 
and the vicious spirit of the elder 
brother. He sulked when he should 
have shouted for joy. But he was 
symbolic of many of the religious 
leaders of that day. And he is sym- 
bolic of many self-righteous people of 
this clay. The Master knew what was in 
man and He here draws the picture 
out of that knowledge of man. It 
may be heresy, but if it is make the 
most of it. I prefer the prodigal son 
to the elder brother. How about you ? 



Censure is the tax a man pays to 
the public for being eminent. — Swift. 



February 24, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Thirteen. 



OUR. CHRISTIAN WORLD TASK. 
(Continued from page 5.) 

couraging evidences are, for the most 
part, surface symptoms. 

IV. 

This, then, is the setting' for your 
discussions in these days. What does 
it mean for the enterprise of Chris- 
tian education "! . . . 

I have urged that the world situ- 
ation is reflected in microcosm on this 
continent. . We may carry the point 
one step further, and suggest that the 
North American situation is reflected, 
in miniature and in epitomy, within 
Christian education. This is just as 
we should expect. For education has 
been a special preoccupation of the 
American people in the recent period. 
The newest trends, in both thought 
and method, have had their earliest 
development and their fullest and 
most extreme exploitation here. It is 
here, much more than in the pulpit 
or in any other aspect of its manifold 
program, that the church has been 
compelled to face the movements of 
modern thought and modern life, to 
confront their sharpest challenge to 
old patterns of belief and practice, to 
come to terms with modern culture, 
and to make accommodation to it. In 
this noteworthy sense at least, Chris- 
tian education has been on the fron- 
tiers of the church's life, has served 
as advance guard and pioneer, has 
functioned as the growing edge of 
Christian adventure and advance. 

The results are too well known to 
you to permit detailed exposition. It 
has been an exciting role and a diffi- 
cult one — this role of bridge between 
tradition and novelty, between past 
and future, between an institution 
which, on the whole, continues rela- 
tively unmodified in outlook and hab- 
its and a world of culture and convic- 
tion, of presuppositions and practice, 
which has been moving, on the whole, 
steadily and rapidly away from the 
church. Hard-pressed to continue 
contact at both ends, to maintain 
status within the kaleidoscopic trans- 
mutations in general education and 
culture and to preserve the confidence 
of the churches, Christian education 
has had no alternative but to effect 
almost day - by - day accommodation, 
often through hurried improvisations. 

... I should like to declare my be- 
lief that the church school has been 
given an impossible task. Confronted 
by a prodigious expansion in secular 
e d u c a t i o n — buildings, equipment, 
budgets, personnel ; seemingly unlim- 
ited civic funds at their command ; 
new divisions, departments, subjects 



spawning with exultant unrestraint; 
one sees the church school, at once 
breathless and excited, intrigued and 
affrighted, panting to keep pace ; lim- 
ited in time available to one or two 
hours weekly in comparison with five 
full school days ; limited in equipment 
to the meager facilities of the church 
building in comparison with the mag- 
nificent learning factories of secular 
education ; limited in personnel to the 
undependable services of an inade- 
quate staff of ill-trained volunteers in 
comparison with vast regiments of 
highly trained professionals; limited 
(many would contend) by traditional 
ideologies in comparison to the newest 
fashions of an ever-changing secular 
mind. Recourse has been had to all 
manner of ingenious expedients. . . . 
But who would question that, general- 
ly speaking, the end-product in the 
eyes of the pupils upon whom these 
comparisons strike with inescapable 
vividness is a poor showing in com- 
parison with ' ' general education ? ' ' 

This has been true equally in the 
realm of thought and in the area of 
method. 

Far more than any other aspect of 
the church's program, Christian edu- 
cation has had to come to terms with 
dominant trends in the thought of the 
times. Church worship could per- 
petuate traditional patterns; the pul- 
pit could continue its accustomed mes- 
sage and manner of presentation. But 
the church school, meeting but once 
weekly, without much support of tra- 
ditional liturgy, the keen young 
minds of the nation's youth, fresh 
from intriguing and persuasive indoc- 
trination in the latest dogmas of con- 
temporary thought through the week- 
day classroom, has had no alternative 
but to meet the challenge head-on and 
make such adjustment as it could. 
That adjustment, inevitably, has been 
in either of two opposite directions, 
and often extreme in both directions 
— either rejection of the modern 
mind, which has driven an impos- 
sible chasm between the one-hour a 
week teaching of the church school 
and the twenty-hour a week teaching 
of the secular classroom ; or accom- 
modation to the modern mind, which 
often impresses youth as a somewhat 
hurried and harassed and humiliating 
revamping of Christian faith, to be 
tacked on to the fringes, or squeezed 
into the interstices, of a predomi- 
nantly secular outlook. 

V. 

... To meet, at all adequately and 
effectively, the needs of this tense 
and tragic hour at any point will be 



Huperlatively difficult. But, two things 
at least are clear. The hour is strik- 
ing for a quite new, far more rigor- 
ous and far more vigorous, thrust of 
massed Christian attack on every 
hard-pressed front. In that advance, 
the only weapon of significant power 
is Christian faith in its full richness 
and profundity and certitude. More 
than that, this is the only message 
from our churches, whether on the far 
frontiers of the world mission or in 
this nation or in the immediate pro- 
gram of Christian education, which 
has any chance of arresting the atten- 
tion let alone claiming the allegiance 
of those who understand their world's 
peril and care deeply for its salvag- 
ing, those who are worth reaching. 
Finally, it is the only message which 
accords with truth and reality, which 
is worthy of the Lord of all being 
and all life. 



IT MAKES A DIFFERENCE. 

■ Some years ago, at a drawing-room 
function, one of England's leading 
actors was asked to recite for the plea- 
sure of his fellow guests. He con- 
sented and asked if there was any- 
thing special that his audience would 
like to hear. After a moment's pail e, 
an aged minister arose and said, 
"Could you, Sir, recite to us the 
Twenty-Third Psalm?" 

A strange look passed over the 
great actor's face. He paused for a 
moment, and then said, "I can, and 
I will upon one condition; and that 
is that, after I have recited it, you, 
my friend, will do the same." Im- 
pressively, the great actor began the 
psalm. His voice and his intonation 
were perfect. He held his audience 
spellbound; and, as he finished, a 
great burst of applause broke from 
the guests. 

Then, as it died away, the aged 
minister arose and began to recite. 
His voice was not remarkable; his in- 
tonation was not faultless. When lie 
had finished, no sound of applause 
broke the silence, but there was not a 
dry eye in the room, and many heads 
and hearts were bowed in reverential 
awe ! 

The great actor rose to his feet 
again. His voice shook witli uncon- 
trollable emotion as he laid his hand 
upon the shoulder of the aged minis- 
ter, and said to the audience, "I have 
reached your eyes and ears, my 
friends. This man has reached your 
hearts. The difference is just this : 
I know the Twenty-Third Psalm, but 
lie knows the Shepherd." — World's 
Crisis. 



Page Fourteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 24, 1949. 



§ The Orphanage | 

I Chas. D. Johnston, Supt. g 
aigMa'sjai^aj'^'aiajafaiaMsiaiajaEMaMajaja) 

Dear Friends: 

The Board of Trustees of the Chris- 
tian Orphanage met in its regular an- 
nual meeting on February 16, with 
eleven out of fifteen members present, 
to consider the Superintendent's re- 
port as to the activities of the Or- 
phanage during the year, 1948 ; and 
to transact such other matters that 
might come up for consideration. 

The Superintendent's report showed 
that the Orphanage children had had 
excellent health during' 1948 and that 
all of them gained weight except three 
girls. (They had been dieting to 
keep from getting too large.) 

It also showed that the farm and 
dairy had produced well ; that the 
children had had plenty of garden 
vegetables. We are now having plen- 
ty of turnip salad. 

The Christian Orphanage has al- 
ways been blessed with a splendid 
Board of Trustees ; men and women 
of business ability, who are very con- 
siderate and fine to work with. It is 
a pleasure to serve as Superintendent 
under their leadership. 

Early last year we decided a build 
a poultry house and put in a flock of 
chickens. We went to Greensboro 
and bought an army barrack and 
moved it down here and set it up. It 
makes an ideal poultry house. We 
had lots of hens given to us and we 
bought seme pullets, and then we 
raised eighty during 1498. They are 
producing about 130 eggs per day. 
We had an expert to cull them since 
Christmas, and out of eighty hens he 
only discarded eight. The children 
here have all the eggs they need and 
are enjoying them to their hearts' 
c:ntent. 

The weather continues to give us 
lots cf rain in this section. The 
prouncl has not been dry enough to 
plow but three days since the first of 
December, 1948. It has greatly hin- 
dered the farmers in getting their 
land broken for their spring crops. 
But we do not worry. Every year 
we have a time to plant and a time 
to harvest. 

Chas. D. Johnston, 

Supervtitendent. 



Western N. C. Conference: 

Pleasant Grove $ 5.00 

Spoon's Chapel 1.60 

6.60 

Va. Valley Conference : 

Bethel S. S $ 6.00 

Dry Run S. S. (T'giving) . . 12.82 

Linville 15.75 

34.57 

Ga. Conference: 
Vanceville S. S 3. 00 

Total this week from churches $ 49.37 

Total this year from churches $1,215.99 
SPECIAL OFFERINGS. 

Amount brought forward $2,110.10 

Mr. Hu'ghes, children .... $ 45.00 
Mrs. Burgess, Jimmy .... 10.00 

Jesse Patrick 5. 00 

Gasoline refund 58.50 

118.50 

Total this year from 

Special Offerings $2,228.60 

Grand total- for the week ... $ 167.87 

Grand total for the year . . . $3,444.59 



REPORT FOR FEBRUARY 24, 1949. 
Sunday School Monthly Offerings. 

Amount brought forward $1,166.62 

Eastern Va. Conference : 
Spring Hill S. S 5.20 



(Continued from page 9.) 
THE WORLD AT PRAYER, 
held with the deaconnesses of the 
Dondi area in Angola, so that they 
might prepare the village women for 
the service in the Umbundu language. 
In Luluabourg, Belgian Congo, the 
village women studied the Bible 
verses of the program for two weeks 
before the Day. The Czech women 
mjoyed the Day so much that they 
planned for another prayer service 
1 efore Whitsunday. In Lahore, Pak- 
istan, all .the denominations, the 
TWCA and the Salvation Army ob- 
served the Day, and a YWCA worker 
writes, ' ' It was such a blessed service 
that the committee decided to have 
two services, one in April and one 
next November." Scotland reports a 
growing desire to hold monthly meet- 
ings to prepare for the Day. In Jo- 
hannesburg, the program was trans- 
lated into three Bantu languages, and 
many Bantu "joined the chain of 
prayer for the first time. ' ' Eight na- 
tionalities gathered together at that 
Bantu meeting in Johannesburg," 
writes a participant, "and as we lift- 
ed our voices in praise in a well- 
known hymn, the thought came to me 
suddenly that Heaven must be like 
that, all one in Christ, all barriers of 
race and creed fallen away." 

It has often been mentioned that 
Queen Salote of the Tonga Islands, 
where the Day begins, regularly leads 
her subjects in the World Day of 
Prayer service. This year Queen 
Salote was visiting in Auckland, New 
Zealand, but she gathered a group 
of friends from the Islands about her 



and had a special World Day of 
Prayer service there. In a written 
statement she explained that she has 
observed the Day for twenty-two 
years. 

The village of Star Child in North 
Kwantung, China, is in a country 
community isolated by miles of diffi- 
cult transportation and by century- 
old customs which are largely un- 
touched by our scientific age. In the 
small rural church there, the pastor's 
wife led the service. The report that 
was sent to the National Christian 
Council is translated lierally in order 
to convey its original charm. 

"A rural community is not able to 
get away from the holiday atmosphere 
of the New Year festival. The World 
Day of Prayer came exactly on the 
fourth of the New Year. The sky 
was bright and the air was warm. 
Many of the women wore the new 
clothes which are a part of the cele- 
bration. Smiling happily they came 
into the church, where they saw the 
benches arranged in a circle. At the 
opening of the circle was hung a map 
of the world. The chairs were bound 
together by a paper chain of many 
colors. This was a symbol of the 
inner meaning of the women of the 
world at prayer together. 

"The chairman first of all talked 
about the map, so that a world con- 
sciousness would underlie the hour of 
prayer. Then the program issued by 
the Kwantung Synod (that sent out 
by the Foreign Missions Conference) 
was followed. Fifteen young men 
and women had been invited to take 
part in the program, some to sing, 
some to tell the special stories and 
some to lead in prayer. The meeting 
lasted for an hour and a half. Al- 
though we live in a country village, 
far removed from any city, in an 
humble little town, still we could be a 
part of the world united in prayer 
and could lift our earnest petitions 
that Christ 's Kingdom would come on 
earth and that Christ's followers 
would be faithful to Him." 

A woman said, "I never miss the 
World Day of Prayer service; it 
makes me feel connected with all the 
world." And a little girl, "After 
this, I am going to pray for every- 
body." There, probably, we have 
both the cause and the effect of the 
World Day of Prayer. 



You are more likely to fail in your 
career from acquiring the habit of 
drinking liquor than from any of the 
other temptations likely to assail you. 
T have known of but few exceptions to 
the rule. — Andrew Carnegie. 



February 24, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Fifteen. 



REPORT PROM AFRICA. 
(Continued from back page.) 
stances the women and children have 
to do public service on the roads. 

We called at the home of our pas- 
tor, Rev. Jayme Velinga, whose ordi- 
nation I attended in 1946. He and 
his wife have been sent to this area as 
missionaries by the Umbundu Church, 
in the interior. Many of the drafted 
laborers and many of the families are 
from our own highland Christian 
communities and the people back 
home feel a deep responsibility for 
those of their number who have been 
taken away and also for the thousands 
of others who are not attached to the 
church, but for whom there is no hope 
in these camps and compounds. 

Senhor Jayme and his wife and 
their eleven children live in a little 
two-room adobe house with an extra 
little hut a few feet away serving as 
a kitchen. The cleanliness and neat- 
ness of the house and the children has 
to be seen to be believed. We were 
invited in to have tea and a little fruit 
which they had secured somewhere, 
and then went out to inspect the gar- 
den. In this land of high prices Sr. 
Jayme 's salary of $28 a month doesn't 
even begin to care for his family and 
so -a big garden is essential. The 
whole family had pitched in and 
cleared several big patches of ground, 
perhaps an acre in all, of heavy thorn 
trees as high as a man and with spikes 
like three-penny nails. This brush 
had been piled in a sort of hedge to 
act as a deterrent to lions and then 
a well had been dug by hand. For- 
tunately they had to go down only 
eight or ten feet to strike the back 
seepage from the river. Little trenches 
were constructed and the water was 
drawn up by hand in improvised 
buckets (a second-hand, four-gallon 
oil tin costs $2 U.S.) and fed into the 
trenches. By this primitive means 
they managed to grow a lot of beans, 
tomatoes, cabbage and other things, 
some of which they eat themselves 
and some they sell to the vegetable- 
starved laborers in the camps. 

One of the missionaries used a spe- 
cial gift to buy a small hand pump 
such as many American farm kitchens 
used to have and a short length of 
pipe, for about four times what these 
things cost in the United States, and 
for a time everything went well with 
all of the kids taking turns on the lit- 
tle pump, keeping it going continu- 
ously. However, the inevitable hap- 
pened, and one of the little boys, not 
being used to even the simplest ma- 
chinery and not noticing anything 
when the pump came loose from its 



plank base, broke it, and it is now in 
Benguella for repairs which will cost 
perhaps a quarter of a month 's salary. 
Lest someone be tempted to give this 
worthy man a little engine and power 
pump let me hasten to say that he 
would have to pay as much for a 
quart of gas as you pay for a gallon 
and a half, and that a few hours' 
pumping would exhaust the very lim- 
ited water supply. 

After an hour or so in and around 
Sr. Jayme 's home we took him into 
the car with us to visit one of his 
charges. In addition to his work at 
the cane plantation his parish in- 
cludes a large number of fisheries, 
with several thousand workers, spread 
out over perhaps a hundred miles of 
coast. As we left, the mother and 
her flock of children lined up on the 
little veranda and sang a very touch- 
ing song to speed us on our way. 

Sr. Jayme has to visit the various 
parts of his spread-out parish on foot, 
on a bicycle, or by begging rides on 
the occasional heavy truck that comes 
through the desert or on the sailing 
barques that serve the fisheries. Each 
plantation or each fishery has a lead- 
er, one of the workmen, chosen by his 
fellows, who keeps the services going, 
runs a little night school, and serves 
generally as a morale builder. There 
are also three or four unordained 
evangelists paid by the up - country 
church who help Sr. Jayme. 

One of our greatest needs is for a 
missionary family to be located at the 
coast to help in the city work of Lo- 
bito and Benguella, and to move up 
and down the coast in these planta- 
tions and fisheries, encouraging and 
guiding the pastor and the lay leaders 
and establishing friendly relations 
with the many Portuguese managers 
so that the difficult conditions under 
which the men work may be allevi- 
ated in so far as is possible, and par- 
ticularly so that the doors may be 
opened to the devoted representatives 
of the African Church as they go 
about their important task. The 
Church is willing and able to give 
large missionary offerings to keep its 
own representatives at work, but it is 
obviously unable to do anything to- 
wards providing the necessary mis- 
sionary help and supervision. This is 
the task of the American Church. 
The great desire of the pastors, lay 
leaders and workers on the Coast is 
for a full-time missionary colleague 
and helper. They are exceedingly 
grateful for the occasional visits that 
Dr. McDowell is able to make from 
his station in the interior, and recog- 
nize that he can't do any more in the 



face of his heavy responsibilities 
there, but their pleading for one of 
their own is almost pathetic. 



The death of Jan Hofmeyer in Jo- 
hannesburg is generally conceded a 
blow to liberal forces in South Africa 
which will be deeply felt, especially 
by our missionaries. The Jan Hof- 
meyer School of Social Work, found- 
ed by our missionary, Ray Phillips, in 
1938, will carry on the name honor- 
ablv and well. 




^MCE REPEAL 




The Fabulous "Dutch" Zellers 

by 

Raymond J. Jeffreys 

Author of "Cod is my Landlord" 




JEFFREYS 

World War II 



'I'lIE author has had 
I a colorful career... 
Graduate of Mt. Union 
College; U. S. Air 
Force in England, 
France and G-ermany 
in World War I; an 
Army Staff Specialist 
after the war; later 
a Foreign Correspon- 
dent ; published a 
chain of newspapers 
and magazines; he- 
came a newspaper 
columnist, feature 
writer and lecturer; 
Special Service for U. 
S. and British Gov. 
Now operates the Jef- 



freys Lecture Bureau and Capitol College. 



THE thrilling, true, real- 
life story of the most 
colorful and notorious boot- 
legger and gangster of the 
"Gay Nineties", who later 
"hit the sawdust trail" at a 
Billy Sunday tabernacle 
meeting — then became a 
sensational liquor investiga- 
tor and crusader for law 
enforcement ... A story 
more startling than fiction. 



Personally Autographed bv 
Jeffreys and Zellers — Only $2.50 

Give copies to your library and friends. 
Send check for as many copies as you 
can use. 



CAPITOL COLLEGE PRESS 

Suite 304, 71 E. State St. 
COLUMBUS 15, OHIO 



Page Sixteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



February 24, 1949. 



REPORT FROM AFRICA 



By JOHN A. REULING 



Lobito is the headquarters for our Coast 
work. The European part of the city is built 
on a 200-yard wide sand spit which runs out 
into the Atlantic Ocean parallel to a jutting 
headland, thus forming a beautiful deep har- 
bor about two miles wide and four or five 
miles long. The American Board owns a 
house on the Bay side of this spit, which is at 
present occupied by Mrs. Jean Hollenbeck. Dr. 
Henry McDowell of Elende had come to the 
Coast to meet us and one of our Portuguese as- 
sociate teachers was in the house waiting for a 
ship home so we were well 
cared for. 

The European part of the 
city is beautiful, but the Na- 
tive city is another matter. It 
is located at the head of the 
Bay in the desert, with not a 
blade of grass, a single tree, or 
any other thing of beauty. 
Little mud houses are crowd- 
ed in together in the relentless 
blazing tropical sun. One 
small tap serves the entire 
community of perhaps 3,090 
people, and women have to 
wait in line for hours to fill 
their water casks. All fire- 
wood has to be brought in on 
women's heads and is very 
expensive. A more dreary, 
desolate, dirty place is hard to imagine. 

And yet in the midst of all this filth and its 
attendant misery, which is completely beyond 
the control of the people who are there under 
compulsion of one sort or another, many do 
manage to have some sort of family life and 
raise children who are well mannered, neat 
and clean. Our Mission outpost in their midst 
has given them a spirit and a will which over- 
comes all difficulties. 

Our first evening in Lobito we were taken 
to the whitewashed building which serves both 
as church and school. The African pastor, 
Sr. Jesse Chipenda, as fine a man as there is 
in any land, met us and showed us the build- 
ing. At first there were just a few people, but 
within a very short time the building filled 
up with perhaps 250 men, women and chil- 




dren. Pastor Jesse played the little rickety 
portable organ while one of the teachers led 
the singing. We were then introduced and 
spoke to the people, giving them greetings 
from the Church in America and trying to give 
them a little encouragement as they strive to 
preserve their integrity and to advance in the 
face of handicaps that would overwhelm most 
of us. At the conclusion of the service a group 
of women stood and sang for us and then the 
leader stepped forward and presented Dr. M:- 
Keith with a beautiful bouquet. Where they 
got it in this desert and what 
it cost them I cannot imagine. 
The woman who presented it 
was fine looking, neatly 
dressed, and with a colorful 
kerchief around her head. 
Much to our surprise we saw 
when she turned to leave the 
platform that she had a sleep- 
ing baby strapped to her back. 

While we were still in Lo- 
bito Bay, Dr. Henry Mc- 
Dowell took us for a day's trip 
into the desert to the South. 
The whole trip, both ways, 
wasn't more than 180 miles, 
but the barren nature of the 
country, the rough track 
which served for a road, and 
the complete absence of any 
kind of traffic gave an illusion of remoteness 
which is hard to describe. 

Our first stop was at Dombe Grande. Here 
a river flows from the highlands, through the 
desert, and into the sea. A company has se- 
cured the rights to the river bottom and has 
large plantations of sugar cane and palm nuts 
which are ground to produce oil. The Afri- 
cans who supply all of the plantation labor are 
brought from their homes in the interior under 
a sort of labor draft. They have little or no 
choice in the matter and have to go when 
called, for terms varying from a year to two 
years. The pay that they receive for this service 
is sub-economic, so their wives and children 
in the interior have to scratch as best they can, 
and that best is very meagre indeed, particu- 
larly as in many in- (Continued on page 15) 



REULING 



1844 - Over a Century oT1SerWe l ?cf l m$ e Denomination - 1949 

The CHRISTIAN SUN 

ORGAN OF THE SOUTHERN CONVENTION OF CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 
In Essentials, Unity — In Non-Essentials, Liberty — In All Things, Charity 

Volume CI. RICHMOND, VA., THURSDAY MARCH 3, 1949. Number 9. 



Beloved Orphanage Superintendent Passes 




CHARLES D. JOHNSTON 
October 23, 1870— February 27, 1949 

The Southern Convention has sustained a great loss in the death of Mr. C. D. 
Johnston, Superintendent of the Christian Orphanage. In his seventy-ninth year, Mr. 
Johnston earned his release from the bonds of mortal life at ten o'clock Sunday night, 
February 27, in his home at Elon College, N. C. His call came to him as it should have 
come — in his home with his loved ones after another day of devoted service to "his chil- 
dren" at the Christian Orphanage. There was no lingering illness, but a quick call and 
he was ready. 

Affectionately known as "Uncle Charlie," Mr. Johnston was for 33 years the kind 
and efficient Superintendent of the Christian Orphanage. Drafted by his church to the 
distinguished position he proved himself a faithful, efficient and trusted servant of the 
church. He was the kindly "father" to more than 600 children coming to the Orphan- 
age during his service. Most of these boys and girls have grown into manhood and 
womanhood and they rise up to call him blessed. 

Taking the responsibility of directing the Christian Orphanage when the institution 
was ill-housed and inadequately financed, Mr. Johnston gained the respect of the church 
until today the Orphanage is liberally supported by the church and by many outside the 
church. The improved facilities of the Orphanage, together with a well-directed pro- 
gram are a tribute to his good management. Not only has Mr. Johnston served the Or- 
phanage for these many years, but he has also been a valued member of the Board of 
Trustees of Elon College, and has served his church on other boards and committees, 
always doing his best to serve when called upon. He was a loyal member of the Elon 
College Community Church. 

Mr. Johnston's place will be difficult to fill at the Orphanage and in the church at 
large. May God raise up other laymen who will love the church as did "Uncle Charlie" 
Johnston. 

Funeral services were conducted at 11:00 on Wednesday, March 2, and his body 
was laid to rest amid a beautiful floral tribute in Magnolia Cemetery. He is survived 
by a large and distinguished family of children and grandchildren. 

Wm. T. Scott. 



Page Two. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 3, 1949. 



I News Flashes | 

Use the Cent-A-Meal Plan for Mis- 
sions in your family. 

Dr. F. C. Lester has been elected by 
the Board of Publications as editor 
of the Missions Page. 



There will be a meeting of the Rich- 
mond Alumni on Friday evening of 
this week. Mr. James Darden and 
Dr. L. E. Smith will be the speakers. 



William Rich, a senior at Elon Col- 
lege, was licensed by the North Caro- 
lina and Virginia Conference at Mr. 
Rich's home church, Providence of 
Graham, Sunday night, February 27. 



Bon voyage to Rev. D. P. Barrett 
who goes to represent the Mission 
Board of the Southern Convention at 
the Diamond Jubilee, celebrating the 
founding of Protestant Missions in 
Puerto Rico, March 6-13. 



Rev. E. T. Cotten writes: "The 
Christian Sun is like a letter from 
home." Mr. Cotten has begun his 
fourteenth year as pastor of Plymouth 
Church in Cincinnati, Ohio. He has 
received 402 members into the church 
during his thirteen-year ministry at 
Plymouth. 



Acceding to the request of the Con- 
vention's Committee on Evangelism, 
we are happy to devote an issue to 
this subject. Rev. R. A. Whitten, 
Chairman of the Convention's Com- 
mittee on Evangelism, has given valu- 
able assistance in securing material 
for this issue. 



Dr. J. H. Dollar, pastor of the Elon 
Church, announces the following Holy 
Week Services : Monday — ' ' The Road 
of Unfruitfulness and Abuse," Tues- 
day — Pageant, ' ' The Betrayal, ' ' Wed- 
nesday — "The Road of Withdrawal 
and Preparation," Thursday — "The 
Road of Spiritual Fellowship" (Holy 
Communion), Friday — "The Road of 
Suffering, ' ' Saturday — Read Mark 
15 :40-47, Easter Sunday, 7 :00 a. m., 
Communion Service on knoll south of 
Christian Education Building, 11 :00 
a. m. — ' ' The Road of Eternal Hope. ' ' 



Highly successful Leadership Train- 
ing Schools were held by the churches 
of the Norfolk-Portsmouth area at 
Rosemont Church and by the churches 



of the Suffolk area at the Suffolk 
Church February 13-23. More than 
150 teachers and officers of the Sun- 
day schools were enrolled. These 
schools were sponsored by the Board 
of Christian Education of the Con- 
vention, the Sunday School Conven- 
tion and pastors of the Eastern Vir- 
ginia Conference. A full report will 
appear later in The Christian Sun. 



Superintendent Scott and Dr. Stan- 
ley U. North of the City Work De- 
partment of the Board of Home Mis- 
sions, New York, visited extensively 
the churches of the Convention dur- 
ing the past week. Places and oppor- 
tunities of Church Extension were 
found. Dr. North expressed himself 
most favorably with the work being 
done in the Convention but also ex- 
pressed amazement that we are not 
doing more to establish new churches 
in growing communities both in Vir- 
ginia and North Carolina. 



DRAMA TO BE PRESENTED FOR 
WORLD DAY OF PRAYER. 

The true story of Congregational 
Church establishment in small towns 
is to be presented as a drama for the 
World Day of Prayer on "Living — 
1949." 

The building of a church in a typi- 
cal American community will be the 
subject of NBC's "Living— 1949" 
program on Sunday, March 6 (4 :35 p. 
m., EST), when the documentary se- 
ries marks the World Day of Prayer. 
The title : "A Blueprint and a 
Prayer. ' ' 

This story of modern religious life 
reflects the plight of communities, 
springing up everywhere, whose resi- 
dents have no church facilities. It is, 
in particular-, the true story of the 
Rev. John F. McClelland, Congrega- 
tional minister, who moved in on 
churchless Silver Spring, Maryland, 
and established a church, first in the 
public park, now in the high school 
gymnasium. 

The Montgomery Blair High School 
gym will be the scene of a special pick- 
up during the broadcast. With the 
floor swept up after the Saturday 
night school dance, folding chairs 
brought up from the basement, im- 
provised altar set up under the bas- 
ketball scoreboard, the members of 
Congregational Christian Church will 
be gathered for worship. 

The script is by Lou Hazam, regu- 
lar "Living — 1949" writer, resident 
of Silver Spring, and member, with 
his family, of Congregational Chris- 



tian Church. Ben Grauer will be nar- 
rator, and Milton Katims will direct 
the orchestra. 



NATIONAL CONVENTION ON CHRIS- 
TIAN EDUCATION. 

The educational agencies of the 
Evangelical and Reformed Church 
and the Congregational Christian 
Churches will sponsor a National Con- 
ference on Christian Edulation at 
Lakeside, Ohio, June 28 to July 1, 
1949. It will offer an opportunity for 
us to demonstrate "Our United Wit- 
ness for Christ, ' ' which is the confer- 
ence theme. The purpose of the con- 
ference is to dedicate ourselves to a 
united witness for Christ through : 

1. Facing our opportunity for Chris- 
tian Education together. 

2. Finding new resources for person- 
al religious living, Bible study, 
worship and fellowship. 

3. Considering the mission of the 
Church in the modern world and 
the responsibility of Christian Ed- 
ucation. 

More than 750 Congregational 
Christian people are expected to at- 
tend this meeting. There will be 1,500 
delegates in all. It will be the first 
large national gathering of represen- 
tatives from both denominations meet- 
ing to work together and to become 
acquainted with one another. This 
is an opportunity for thinking about 
the concerns of the Christian Educa- 
tion program in our church life. 

The program will include seminars 
for every kind of worker in the 
church — sections for workers with ev- 
ery age group, for ministers, laymen, 
and many subjects of general but im- 
perative concern for church members 
today. There will be specialization 
seminars on the various functional 
parts of the church program. Such 
things as drama, worship, radio and 
television, various social problems, as 
well as teaching methods and tech- 
niques with various age groups will be 
the subjects of some of these discus- 
sions. There is to be a set of seminars 
which are of general nature. These 
will be personally enriching and in- 
spiring and instructive to people who 
are working in places of leadership in 
the educational program of our 
churches. 

There will be platform presenta- 
tions by well known church leaders. 
Dr. Henry Smith Leiper will keynote 
the conference with a message from 
the World Council of Churches, of 
which he is a staff member, and of the 
Ecumenical movement in Christen- 
dom. Dr. David Baker, editor of The 
(Continued on page 11.) 



March 3 : , 1949. THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Si iO 



Southern Convention Office | 



Eev. Wm. T. Scott, Superintendent 



MISSION PERIOD AND OUR CHRIS- 
TIAN WORLD MISSION. 

March, April, May and June con- 
stitute the Mission Period of the Con- 
vention. The tragedies of our world 
without Christ ought to enable us to 
see the joy and peace in a world with 
Christ. Our gifts laid upon the altar 
to give Christ to the world — that is a 
practical part of "Our Christian 
World Mission." We ought to be 
concerned and we ought to work for 
the full payment of our missionary 
apportionment. That will be the min- 
imum of an earnest effort on the part 
of the churches of the Southern Con- 
vention to give Jesus Christ to the 
world. 

We cannot and we must not fail the 
Richard Jacksons and their colleagues 
in Shaowu during these trying days 
in China. Jesus Christ is the only 
answer to the problems of China, as 
He is the only answer to the sorrows 
and strife of the whole world. Our 
entire Foreign Mission Apportion- 
ment must be raised if we are to do 
anything like our reasonable share in 
Shaowu and in the other mission sta- 
tions of our denomination around the 
world. 

We must establish new churches 
within the Convention. There are 
opportunities and new communities 
awaiting our action. The only thing 
holding us back is the lack of money ! 
If our churches will raise in full their 
Home Mission Apportionment we will 
have two or three new churches to re- 
port within the year. 

Under the new Apportionment 
Schedule adopted by the Convention 
and its Conferences, Shaowu and 
Church Extension are included in the 
total Foreign and Home Mission Ap- 
portionment. We urge our people to 
deviote themselves to the raising of 
the Missionary Apportionment in full. 

Many of our churches will use the 
Cent-A-Meal Plan to help raise in full 
the mission apportionment. We 
strongly urge our churches to partici- 
pate in this plan. Stickers for coin 
boxes have been sent to pastors for 
distribution among the members of 
our churches. There are approxi- 
mately 10,000 families in our churches 
of the Southern Convention. There 
are 122 days in the Mission Period. If 
every family in the Convention would 



give just a cent a meal during March, 
April, May and June, it would mean 
that $36,000.00 could be raised in this 
way alone for the advancement of the 
Kingdom for which Jesus Christ died. 
Is that asking too much ? 

Give Jesus Christ a chance with 
your life and substance during Mis- 
sion Period. Obtain information con- 
cerning the Cent-A-Meal Plan from 
your pastor, or write direct to The 
Southern Convention Office, Elon Col- 
lege, N. C, and material will be sent. 

The Congregational Christians have 
a world parish of nearly 40 millions 
of people. We have committed our- 
selves to give Jesus Christ to these 
people. They cannot receive unless 
missionaries be sent. Missionaries 
cannot go unless we will give of our 
means. We have committed our lives 
to Jesus Christ and His work. Let us 
fulfill our commitment by our gifts. 

Wm. T. Scott, 
Superintendent . 



ALL STATIONS TO CARRY WORLD 
RELIEF PROGRAM. 

"One Great Hour," an 8:00-9:00 
p. m., EST, radio program to pro- 
mote Church World Service, has been 
scheduled for Saturday, March 26, 
and is to be heard over 1,092 radio 
stations. 

The program will be sponsored by 
the 23 member church group within 
Church World Service. It will be a 
dramatization of present activities of 
Church World Service in Europe and 
Asia, with leading radio actors fea- 
tured. 



Page Three. 

The Christian Sun 

Established 1844 by Rev. Daniel W. K»rr. 

A Religious Weekly for the Home, devoted 
to the interests of the Kingdom as represent- 
ed by the Congregational Christian Churches. 
Our Principles. 

1 . The Lord Jesus Christ is the only 
Head of the Church. 

2. Christian is a sufficient name for the 
Church. 

3. The Bible is a sufficient rule of faith 
and practice. 

4. Christian character is a sufficient test 
of fellowship and Church membership. 

5. The right of private judgment and the 
liberty of conscience is a right and a privi- 
lege that should be accorded to and exer- 
cised by all. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor Bobert Lee House 

Managing Editor John T. Kernodle 

Associate Editors — J. B. Allen, H. Q. Couu- 
cill Jr., J. H. Dollar, F. B. Eutsler, 8. C. 
Harrell, R. M. Kimball, B. V. Munger, 
J. E. Neese, W. W. Sloan, H. S. Smith. 
Corresponding Editors — J. F. Apple (E. N. 
C), W. M. Stevens (N. C. & Va.), P. C. 
Lester f (W. N. C), J. G. Truitt (E. Va.), 
R. A. Whitten (V. Va.). 
Departmental Editors — Wm. T. Scott, Con- 
vention; Mrs. W. J. Andes, Women's 
Work; Miss Elizabeth Chicoine, Young 
People's Work ; Mrs. R. L. House, Chil- 
dren; L. E. Smith, Christian Education; 
Clias. D. Johnston, Orphanage; H. S. 
Hardcastle, Sunday School. 
Board of Publications — W. J. Andes, S. E. 
Madren, W. M. Stevens, W. E. Wisseman, 
T. F. Wright. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Six Months $1.00 

One Year $2.00 



Published by the Board of Publications, 
agent for the Southern Convention of Con- 
gregational Christian Churches, and printed 
every Thursday except the last in June and 
December by the Central Publishing Co., 
Inc., Richmond, Va. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Post 
Office at Richmond, Va., July 25, 1922, un- 
der Act of March 3, 1879. 



Remittances for subscriptions should be sent 
to the Convention Office, Elon College, 
N. C. 

All other matters of business should be ad- 
dressed to The Christian Sun, 1536 East 
Broad Street, Richmond, 19, Va. 

Contributions should reach the editor at 
3206 Grove Avenue, Richmond, 21, Va 



The Christian Sun Subscription Blank 

FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 
FIFTY ISSUES FOR $2.00 

Dr. Wm. T. Scott 
Elon College, N. C. 

Enclosed find $ for which pi ease send The Christian 

Sun for one year to 

Address 

Name 

U New I J Renewal 



Page Four. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 3, 1949. 




*S JVJXSSAGE, 



CONVENTION-WIDE EVANGELISM. 

Spasmodic and desultory efforts in evangelism pro- 
duce negligible results. Greatest gains in membership 
during recent years, according to denominations, have 
resulted from organized, cooperative efforts. 

Our Convention could be organized for a com- 
prehensive, aggressive program of evangelism. Every 
church would be asked to make definite plans for an 
evangelistic campaign. An evangelistic pool could be 
constituted by asking every pastor to volunteer for one 
or more weeks of service outside his own parish. This 
would enable every church, regardless of size to have 
outside assistance or a visiting evangelist. The strong 
would help bear the burdens of the weak. Every local 
church would sense our united strength, would realize 
that it was not alone in its evangelistic efforts. The 
effect would be cumulative. Ministers and laymen 
would gain most valuable evangelistic experience. The 
movement would go from strength to strength and 
from victory to victory. Why not try it? 



EVANGELISM AND CHURCH UNION. 

We dare not make corporate church union a sub- 
stitute for evangelism. But union should heighten 
and multiply our evangelistic opportunities. With 
comity arrangements coming to the fore and gaining 
wider acceptance among the denominations our United 
Church should face its greatest evangelistic challenge. 

There are scores of cities in which there is a Con- 
gregational Christian and an Evangelical and Reformed 
Church. The Merger will strengthen their resources 
and enable them to adequately take care of their comity 
assignments. It is relatively easy for two churches to 
establish a third. Churches projected on this basis be- 
come A-l exhibits in the United Church. 

Our day demands churchmanship of a high order. 
Leadership and financial resources are essential. The 
Merger will enable us to use national leadership of a 
high calibre, plan our program of church extension 
on a national scale, and move with precision and 
strength into areas of opportunity. Failure of the 
Merger to materialize would be a calamity to our pro- 
gram of church extension. 



CHARLES D. JOHNSTON. 
The Christian Orphanage and the Southern Con- 
vention have lost a stalwart leader, and many of us 
have lost a friend of long standing in the sudden pass- 
ing of Brother Charles D. Johnston. Devoted to his 
appointed duty, consistent in Christian service, un- 
ostentatious in speech and living, he exemplified the 
spirit of his Master. His genius for management found 
supurb opportunity for expression in his long and 
fruitful tenure of service at The Orphanage. His con- 
tagious Christian faith was imparted to many children 




who came under his influence. Countless parents and 
children are indebted to him. May his mantle fall on 
a worthy successor. 

URBAN EVANGELISM. 

The Board of Home Missions sponsors a luncheon 
each year at the Mid- Winter Meetings. Last year at 
Grand Rapids it featured rural work. This year at 
Cleveland it emphasized the City Church. The work 
of Dr. Fred Hoskins, minister of Plymouth Church in 
Des Moines, Iowa, has attracted wide attention, and 
he was asked to speak at the Cleveland luncheon. 

Excerpts from his address are quoted: 

"Men are looking for salvation, they are hunting 
comfort, begging for hope, asking for guidance and 
praying for courage and appealing for instruction. 
They want to be saved. If we of the churches have been 
seeking a justification for launching a program of 
evangelism, there is need aplenty and need imperative. 
These needs are particularly apparent in urban churches. 
Most every city in America is growing rapidly. The 
social scientists will give you graphs and statistics. You 
know it from over-crowded housing and from new 
housing. You know it from visitors in your church. 

"There are more young families than ever before. 
More of them are having children than for a long 
time has been true. A greater proportion of these are 
having larger families than most of us have known in 
our ministry, The opportunities for evangelism through 
religious education are without parallel in our exper- 
ience. 

"Most every church has a group of folk who are 
members only nominally. Here is an opportunity for 
evangelism so easy to overlook and so important to 
be met. You see, there isn't such a thing as a church 
not having a field for evangelism. 

"Again, in most every city, the population is fluid 
and becoming increasingly so. People are moving from 
the Southside to the Northside, from the Eastside to 
the Westside, from the Westside to the suburbs and 
acreages. And every house, even an the Eastside or 
Southside, as soon as it is vacated by one family, is 
moved into by one or more other families. Beyond 
all this is the significant and ever increasing flow of 
people from city to city. Scarcely ever does the moving 
van take a trip without exangelistic implications." 

Mr. Hoskins then listed the resources of the urban 
church, which he maintained are "plentiful," and he 
placed "a sufficient gospel" at the top of the list. A- 
mong the other resources are its minister, "who believes 
that the unique service of the church is worship, the 
primary task of the church evangelism and the essential 
method of operation education and fellowship." 

Mr. Hoskin said: "The urban church has a re* 
source also in its city-wide (Please turn to page eleven.) 



March 3, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Five. 



The Call of Christ Is the Call to Evangelize the World 



WORKERS TOGETHER WITH GOD. 

In every community, even close by 
the church, can be found those who 
have not yet enlisted under the ban- 
ner of Jesus Christ our Saviour. If 
we believe that the gospel is "Good 
News," the "Evangel" as proclaimed 
by John 3:16 or Acts 4:10-12, we 
should realize that it is our duty as 
Christians to try to win them for 
Christ and the Church. As the sales- 
man is enthusiastic in extolling the 
quality of the merchandise he sells; 
as the broker boosts the value of the 
stocks and bonds he has to offer ; as 
the craftsman cries the quality of the 
articles he has produced, so we, too, 
should eagerly proclaim the Evangel 
and the quality of life it will produce 
when hearts are yielded in full com- 
mitment to Him, to those who have 
not found our Lord. If we have 
tasted and found "that the Lord is 
good, his mercy everlasting and his 
truth abiding to all generations;" if 
we have experienced God's peace in 
our hearts, we have "Good News" to 
tell to others. 

God is ever seeking to enlist men, 
women and youth to help him in the 
job of creating a new world, a better 
world. If you would share in this 
glorious enterprise offer to God a 
consecrated life willing to be used in 
soul winning. Pray for someone for 
whom you covet the joys of a Chris- 
tian experience. Pray until your in- 
terest in that individual compels you 
to go and tell him what great things 
God has done for your own soul. Let 
him know that you are concerned 
about his salvation and that you want 
Mm to share the joy you experienced 
when you let Christ come into your 
life. The zeal for spreading the Gos- 
pel of Christ must burn in the hearts 
of believers until they become so con- 
cerned about those who have missed 
the way that they must go and seek 
them. God is calling you and will 
use your life to witness for Him. 

God did not address the call direct- 
ly to Isaiah when He said: "Who 
will go for us?" But Isaiah heard 
God's voice. His ears were in tune 
and his heart open to the call of his 
Lord. He was in the presence of God ; 
so close that he could hear Him speak ; 
so consecrated that he had only one 
response: "Here am I, send me." 
Our ears may be so tuned to latest 
things and dulled to lasting things 
that we may miss the voice of the 
Eternal, calling us to witness for 
Him. God forgive us if the love of 



clinking coins, the pursuit of pleas- 
ure or the desire for temporary things 
has kept us from hearing His call. 
Jesus comes close to each of us ; if we 
will we may hear His gentle entreaty 
as the Master's voice brings this call 
and promise : ' ' Follow me and I will 
make you fishers of men. ' ' 

Robert A. Whitten. 



EVANGELISM AND SPIRITUAL 
LIFE. 

The young men from our homes 
who enter the military service of our 
country feel that it is their duty, as 
far as.it is humanly possible, to carry 
out the orders of their commander or 
superior officers. We of the Church 
frequently speak of ourselves as ' ' sol- 
diers of the Cross." That really 
means "soldiers of Christ." We read 
in the gospels that Christ, our Com- 
mander, once called men to "come 
follow Me and I will make you to be- 
come fishers of men. ' ' Again we read 
where He said, "Go ye into all the 
world, and preach the gospel to every 
creature." Are we obedient? When 
I see a group of church men, or wo- 
men, or young people, I cannot help 
but think of what might happen if 
each one should take seriously the 
business of being a Christian and if 
every one tried seriously to win an- 
other to Christ and His way of life. 
May we think on these things and then 

aC *' T. Fred Wright. 



WE CAN ALL WORK. 

Sometimes we think that evangelism 
is to be done only by ministers, and 
especially by those who give them- 
selves to holding evangelistic meet- 
ings. That is a bad mistake. 

There were only twelve disciples of 
Jesus but seventy were sent on a mis- 
sion of evangelism. And they had 
good success. 

Religion may be taught ; but Chris- 
tianity is more often caught. What 
you remember about that excellent 
Sunday school teacher of your child- 
hood is not something she said — you 
remember what she was, and what she 
made you want to be. You "caught" 
her spirit. 

Everybody can be good, and be good 
for something. Not all can preach 
from the pulpit and be a leader of a 
congregation, but everyone can live 
the Christian life and thus help to win 
others to that winsome way of living. 

A visit to the home of those who do 
not know Christ may be the beginning 



of evangelism in that home. An in- 
vitation to attend Sunday school and 
church is another step in the right di- 
rection. To take people with you to 
Sunday school and church and to see 
that they have a hearty welcome into 
the fellowship of Christian workers 
and worshippers is to bring them close 
to the fellowship of God. "Introduc- 
ing men to God" is simply explaining 
to them the sources of your deepest 
joy and sublimest friendship. "From 
whence cometh my help ? My help 
cometh from God." That is evange- 
lism on the level where every Chris- 
tian may share. 

The understanding friendship of 
the Church is an absolute essential 
for evangelism. Death - bed stories, 
dramatic preaching, and even lengthy 
prayers cannot take the place of the 
warmhearted interest of the Church 
for people who are outside of the fel- 
lowship of those who care. One rea- 
son so few people join our churches is 
that our churches are so little inter- 
ested in the people outside the inner 
fellowship. This is a cause for peni- 
tence, and a change. The change may 
mean that some of us will take a car 
load of people to church each Sunday, 
and that special emphasis will be put 
upon Sunday school and church at- 
tendance from now until Easter. 

Children are born to families every 
month of the year. Why should this 
rule not apply to the Church? Saints 
may need a revival once each year, 
but sinners need a new birth at all 
times. Our Convention is asking the 
churches to seek for converts every 
month of the year, and in this the 
Convention is right. Now is the time 
for pastors, deacons, teachers, and all 
church people to organize the fellow- 
ship of believers so the people of the 
community will come to believe that 
wo really want new members of the 
household of faith. 

In conclusion let it be remembered 
that those who pray also work. With- 
out prayer the work is ineffective, and 
without work the prayer is crippled. 
The two need to go together. 

F. C. Lester. 



WHAT IS MY CHURCH? 

Is my church where my grand- 
mother is buried, the building in 
Avhich I was baptized, or the minister 
who married me? No, the church is 
the organized expression of Christi- 
anity in the community in which I 
live. If I keep my membership in a 
(Continued on page 13.) 



Page Six. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 3, 1949. 



CONTRIBUTIONS 



SUFFOLK LETTEE. 

We were all very pleased with the 
Leadership Training School held this 
week in the Suffolk Church. Some 
seventy - five teachers and Sunday 
school workers attended regularly, 
and more than one hundred attended 
some of the classes. The following 
Sunday schools were represented : Be- 
rea, Bethlehem, Cypress Chapel, 
Franklin, Holland, Holy Neck, Lib- 
erty Spring, Oakland, Mt. Zion, 
Spring Hill, Suffolk, Waverly and 
Windsor. By unanimous vote it was 
requested of S'upt, W. T. Scott, and 
the Board of Christian Education 
that the school be held again next 
year. 

The Rev. Bernard V. Munger, 
Chapel Hill, N. C, taught a class in 
"Teaching Youth," and several lead- 
ers of young people were greatly 
pleased with his course. Dr. Ferris 
B. Reynolds, of the Elon faculty, 
preached in the Suffolk pulpit Sun- 
day morning, and made such a fine 
impression his class was unusually 
large. He held their interest right 
through to the end. Many were the 
expressions of praise for his work. 
His was a course in "The Life of 
Christ." 

Perhaps Miss Leila Anderson had 
the largest number of those who were 
actual teachers in Sunday schools, for 
one reason she covered all the depart- 
ments in her course from Juniors to 
Beginners, and because also teachers 
of classes in those departments seemed 
very anxious to have help in their 
work. Her class was large and very 
enthusiastic. She was exceedingly 
well prepared to do her work, and 
made special preparation for every 
session. Members of her class were 
very generous in their praise of her 
work. 

Much of the good of such a school as 
the one we have just enjoyed is be- 
yond the classrooms. The fellowship 
with one another was great. Those 
taking the courses, many of them at 
least, came early and lingered after 
classes were over. Mr. Floyd A. 
Turner, the superintendent of the 
Suffolk Sunday school, and the writ- 
er, along with a goodly number of our 
own teachers were delighted to act as 
hosts and hostesses. The cooperation 
of everyone was appreciated. Super- 
intendent Scott brought greetings at 
one of the "chapel services," and Mrs. 



Frank C. Laubach spoke briefly at an- 
other of these services. Mrs. Laubach 
spoke to the combined women's classes 
of our church on Sunday morning 
much to their edification and delight. 
On Monday morning Dr. Stanley U. 
North addressed the ministers of the 
Eastern Virginia Conference, and he 
and Superintendent Scott held sev- 
eral conferences with pastors of this 
area. 

By the time this letter reaches you 
we shall have helped to entertain and 
heard the Elon Singers. They al- 
ways make a good impression here, 
and our folks are delighted to have 
them both in our church and in our 

k° mes ' John G-. Truitt. 



THOSE ABSENT MEMBERS. 

How did you vote ? Thirty per cent 
is the average of church attendance of 
Protestant Christians. Those mem- 
bers who attend the services of the 
church are voting for its progress. 
Those who stay aAvay without a reason 
are voting too, but their ballot is 
against the church and its program. 
Those who remain away from the 
church miss the fellowship of old 
friends, the joy of making new 
friends. They lose the joy of sus- 
taining grace and communion with 
God that comes when believers wor- 
ship together. The church member 
who continually absents himself from 
the church eventually loses interest in 
it, thereby missing the help his church 
has to offer in his own Christian liv- 
ing. The Church loses too. And what 
a loss ! The non-attendant has with- 
drawn from the church his helpful 
suggestions, sympathetic understand- 
ing, and in most cases his financial 
support and even his prayers. Per- 
haps the greatest loss the Church of 
God sustains through its members 
who willfully and deliberately stay 
away from its doors is their influence 
upon people who are not believers. 
The world, fairly or otherwise, is 
judging the church's value by the at- 
titude of its members. And church 
attendance is one point of criticism. 
The successful business man must 
guard carefully his assets. He must 
keep a watchful eye over that which 
earns for him the greater dividend. 
He is also most careful to put into ser- 
vice any assets temporarily out of 



circulation. The church is made up 
of believers and they are her greatest 
asset. A beautiful building, a well- 
trained choir and a consecrated min- 
ister are not enough. It may be said 
with gratitude that every church has 
among its membership hard working, 
devoted servants of God ; but it must 
be admitted with sorrow and shame 
that every church roll also carries the 
names of those who at some happy 
floodtide of their experience united 
with the church; and then, for one 
reason or another, drifted away from 
its influence. It is this group which 
needs the church so much. The 
The church needs them. As never be- 
fore the church needs to present to 
the world a united fellowship. We 
must win them back. The first step 
in preparation for Christian living 
and soul winning is a yielded will, ab- 
solute commitment to God without res- 
ervation. Prayer is the communication 
line between man and God. Keep the 
channel clear, for God is always wait- 
ing to hear His children when they 
desire communion with Him. Pray 
as if all depended upon God and work 
as if God were depending entirely 
iipon you. "The fruit of the right- 
eous is a tree of life ; and he that win- 
neth souls is wise. ' ' (Proverbs 11 :30. ) 

Robert A. Whitten. 



GRAHAM YOUTH WINS FIRST 
PRIZE. 

Billy F. Andrews, a young member 
of our Graham Sunday school and 
church at Providence Memorial, came 
off with first prize in the recent Decla- 
mation Contest sponsored by the 
Young Republicans of North Caro- 
lina. Billy, a star athlete of his school 
and a stirring public speaker, won the 
$100 prize Saturday, February 12, at 
a State-wide meeting of Young Re- 
publicans in Winston-Salem. He tri- 
umphed over nine other contestants 
as he spoke on the subject, "The Re- 
publican Party in the Future." 

He is a youth that one can be proud 
of. He not only will prove a leader in 
political circles in the future but will 
be one of our strong leaders in the 
church. He spoke very highly of his 
minister, Dr. F. E. Reynolds, and of 
his church as "being one of the old- 
est churches in the State." To him, 
as I talked with him, his church was 
held high in his regard and he spoke 
lovingly of the work of the church. 
Our congratulations to you, Mr. Billy 
F. Andrews of the Providence Me- 
morial Church, Graham, N. C. 

W. J. Andes. 



March 3,. 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Seven. 



News of Elon College 



By President L. E. Smith 



THE ST ALE Y- ATKINSON -NEWMAN 
MEMORIAL FUND FOR CHRIS- 
TIAN EDUCATION AT ELON 
COLLEGE. 

Some years ago the Eastern Vir- 
ginia Conference voted expressing a 
desire to establish a foundation for 
Christian education at Elon College 
honoring three of our outstanding 
churchmen — Dr. W. W. Staley serv- 
ing the pastorate, Dr. J. 0. Atkinson 



There are 195 churches in the Con- 
vention. Ninety of these churches ac- 
cepted their quotas ; ten of the re- 
maining made some contribution ; 
ninety-five neither accepted their 
quota nor have made any contribu- 
tion to the fund. A number of the 
churches that accepted their quotas 
went far beyond what they were asked 
to pay. Some of these churches have 
paid their quotas in full. In addition 



ty for this department. In order that 
the program might be inaugurated at 
once the college advanced money out 
of its undesignated funds to make the 
total amount of $100,000.00 avail- 
able. In September, 1947, Dr. W. W. 
Sloan was added to the department as 
a professor of Christian education. 
Dr. Sloan has done and is doing a 
very good job in this field. In ad- 
vancing the funds for this purpose the 
college anticipated funds from the 
churches sufficient to repay the loan. 
Of the amount owing the undesig- 
nated fund, $12,500.00 is needed now. 
It would be a great help to the college 
if churches and individuals owing 
pledges would make a special effort to 



SOLOISTS APPEARING WITH THE ELON SINGERS ON NORTHERN TOUR 




Top row (left to right): Roger Gibbs, Baritone; Jeanne 
Tenor. Bottom row: Sharon Black, Soprano; Jack 
The choir is making two long trips this spring. On Fri 
make appearances in Suffolk, Newport News, South Nor 
choir will make a northern tour which will include appea 
ford, Conn., Springfield, Mass., Boston, Mass., Providen 
Washington, D. C. The full itinerary for the tour is not 
assisted by Fletcher Moore 



Meredith, Soprano; Ann Truitt, Soprano; Jack Castle, 
McFayden, Baritone; Dorothy Jones Parker, Contralto, 
day, February 25, the choir went to Eastern Virginia to 
folk, Portsmouth and Norfolk. On Friday, March 4, the 
ranees in Richmond, Philadelphia, Westfield, N. J., Hart- 
ce, R. I., New York City, N. Y., Jersey City, N. J., and 
complete at this time. John Westmoreland is director, 
organist and accompanist. 



in the field of missions, and Dr. J. U. 
Newman in the field of Christian edu- 
cation. Other conferences approved 
the plan and voted cooperation. Later 
the Southern Convention in session 
gave its approval and authorized the 
solicitation of funds. The amount to 
be raised was $100,000.00. This 
amount was apportioned to the sever- 
al conferences constituting the Con- 
vention on the basis of ten times the 
conference apportionment for the col- 
lege as of 1943. The college, in co- 
operation with the church, undertook 
to induce the local churches in the 
Convention to accept their quotas and 
pay the same either on a cash or time 
basis. 



to church contributions quite a num- 
ber of friends have made individual 
contributions totaling $18,414.31. A 
grand total of $110,729.36 has been 
secured in cash and pledges. A total 
of $86,653.76 has been received in 
cash leaving $27,075.60 to be paid. 
Some of these pledges are made to be 
paid over a period of five years. The 
long term pledges have from one to 
two years more to go. It is hoped that 
all churches will raise their quotas so 
that the foundation may be set up for 
$110,729.36 instead of $100,000.00. 
The foundation was authorized to en- 
able the college to increase its cur- 
riculum in Christian education which 
would call for larger teaching facul- 



make some contribution. These un- 
paid pledges are good and we are con- 
fident that they will be paid in due 
time. At present the college finds 
itself greatly in need of funds. 

As we review our campaign to date 
it is evident that our churches that 
were willing to comply with the re- 
quest of the conference have done a 
most excellent job. In fact, it is out- 
standing. The completion of this 
campaign will enable the college to 
make a much greater contribution to 
the chtirch than otherwise would have 
been possible. The college and I, 
personally, would like to express ap- 
preciation to all who have contributed 
(Continued on page 14.) 



Page Eight. THE CHRISTIAN SUN March 3,1949. 

Our Christian World Mission 

Rev. F. C. LESTER, Writer 



LEARN 

The first part of our mission in the 
world is to learn. We need to know 
what our world is like, and what kind 
of people are shaping our destiny. 

Our Mission Boards 

Our Southern Convention Board re- 
ceives money for missions, appropri- 
ates for work within this area, and 
forwards money for work in the 
United States to the Home Boards in 
New York City, and for overseas work 
to the Boston office of the American 
Board of Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions. 

These boards are all elected by our 
church people, and we are composed 
of people who are interested in the 
spread of the Gospel at home and 
abroad. 

» China 

For 101 years our Church has been 
at work in China. We began with the 
Foochow Mission, which now centers 
in Foocow City, Diongloh and Pagoda 
Anchorage, and Ingtai. 

Last year the mission celebrated its 
hundredth anniversary, a year late on 
account of the war. The departments 
and institutions all shared in the cel- 
ebration. They included : city and 
rural churches, Fukien Christian Un- 
iversity, Willis F. Pierce Memorial 
Hospital, Foochow College, Orlinda 
Childs Pierce School for Girls, and 
the Union High School. 

We have thirty-three missionaries 
in this mission. Several of them have 
been in the Southern Convention, and 
others are known by our people. Rev. 
and Mrs. Robert E. Chandler were in 
our home the Eastern Sunday that 
our first baby was born. Mr. and 
Mrs. Leonard Christian are well 
known by our Reidsville people. Oth- 
ers we know are Albert Farout, Miss 
Jennie Jacobs, Rev. and Mrs. A. 0. 
Rinden, Miss Helen H. Smith, Rev. 
and Mrs. E. Walter Smith (who went 
to school at Duke), Mr. and Mrs. Guy 
Thelin, and Miss Eunice Thomas. 
These are some of our friends in 
China. 



WORK 

The second part of any worth- 
while endeavor is work. This is very 
true of Our Christian World Mis- 
sion. Knowledge does little good un- 
less it is used. 

There are many ways in which we 
can work at our world-wide mission. 
Here are some : 

Letters 

A letter from you to one of the mis- 
sionaries may give just the lift that 
missionary needs. If you were in 
China today, would you want letters 
from America? Practice of the Gol- 
den Rule may demand that you write 
to our missionaries. 

Letters to the people with whom the 
missionaries work are also very help- 
ful, when properly done. A million 
letters from our million members to a 
million Chinese might do more than an 
army with banners in making China 
Christian. Who knows? 

Letters to your friends may make 
enthusiastic supporters of missions, 
or even secure candidates for mission 
work. 

Meetings 

Good mission meetings come from 
hard work. Programs that teach and 
inspire to Christian activity require 
real effort. We need many more good 
missionary meetings in our area. 

Missionaries are glad to come to our 
churches and our homes to tell us 
what is being done on the other side 
of the earth. But it takes work to 
issue invitations, plan meetings, and 
see that the guest is properly cared 
for. 

Money 

Money will not save the world, 
but it takes money to heal the sick, 
feed the hungry, teach the ignorant, 
and preach the Gospel. 

Last year we gave $1.20 per church 
member for missions at home and 
abroad. It will take a long time to 
save the world at that rate. 



PRAY 

Prayer is the third element in our 
world mission. It is a Christian mis- 
sion, and without prayer there can be 
no Christians. 

Prayer Is Requested 

The first civilians to enter Japan 
after the recent war were Christians. 
In humility they asked what Chris- 
tians in America could do for the 
Japanese. The first request was for 
prayer. 

Angie Crew in Japan, the Jacksons 
in China, and missionaries around the 
world urge us to pray for them. 

Let's Pray 

During this mission period, let's 
pray daily for our missions and mis- 
sionaries. They wish it ; we can do it. 
God answers prayer. 

In order that we may be together in 
our intercession, here is a daily prayer 
list: 

Our Prayer List 

Sunday — The Jacksons in Shaowu, 
China. 

Bichard is a minister working with 
other ministers, trying to reach a mil- 
lion people. Dorothy is Richard's wife 
in the truest meaning of the word, 
and a missionary in her own right. 
Lewis is the baby boy. We want him 
to be good and charming, like his 
parents. 

Monday — The Riggs in Shaowu. 

Frances we commissioned as a nurse, 
and Ed is a doctor. Both are badly 
needed in the hospital and among a 
million people. 

Tuesday — The Shaowu Pastors. 

Their task is not easy today. 
Wednesdmi — Hospital Workers in 
Shaowu. 

On them depends the health of multi- 
tudes. 

Thursday — The Shaowu Mission. 

Churches, members, schools — all who 
are reached in any way. 

Friday — Foochow Mission. 

The 33 missionaries, native workers, 
schools, hospital, members of churches 
and prospective members. 

Saturday — Missionaries listed in first 
column of this page. 

They are our friends. We must re- 
member them at a throne of grace. 



OUR UNITED PRAYER 

O God, "our Father," we pray for missions and missionaries. We cannot see the 
places nor the people, but thou art there — everywhere that people live. Make thyself 
known to all who seek for knowledge or fellowship. Keep thy people from harm. 
Strengthen all good impulses, and transform faith into accomplishments. Let the tests 
of these difficult days show the power of God's sustaining grace through Jesus Christ. 

Amen. 



March 3, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Church Women at Work 

With Emphasis on Missions 

Mrs. W. J. Andes, Editor 
637 S. Sunset Drive, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



EVERY CHRISTIAN AN EVAN- 
GELIST. 

While at the General Council and 
Midwinter Meetings in Cleveland, Mr. 
Whitten asked me if I would write a 
short article on Evangelism for The 
Christian Sun. I told him that I 
would and then I thought — who am 
I to be writing about Evangelism ! I, 
who do so little toward evangelizing 
the world ; I, who like Martha of old, 
am so "cumbered about many things" 
that Christ's words, "and ye shall be 
my witness," sometimes seem far re- 
moved and I find myself thinking they 
apply only to Dorothy Jackson, Fran- 
ces Riggs and other missionaries on 
foreign lands. Then something that 
Dr. Hatanaka said as he spoke to the 
women state president at Cleveland, 
made me realize anew that the words 
of Christ, "ye shall be my witness," 
can and should apply to every Chris- 
tian wherever they may be. Dr. Hata- 
naka said, "Every Christian who 
comes to Japan, if a true Christian is 
a missionary, by their words, their 
acts, their attitudes they can help to 
evangelize Japan." 

Just so, you and I, here in America 
can be evangelists — just in our daily 
contacts as we let the Spirit of Christ 
shine through a consecrated eye. 

Although apparently overshadowed 
by the merger proceedings, to me the 
most significant thing that came out 
of the Oberlin Council was "The 
Call" to our Congregational Christian 
Fellowship "to confront the world 
with the gospel of our Lord Jesus 
Christ — to bestir itself in recruitment 
for Christ and having heard the Call 
to answer that Call with a renewed 
personal commitment to Christ as we 
set our faces toward the task, for only 
when those about realize we have been 
with Jesus will our efforts be success- 
ful. 

Mrs. 0. H. Paris. 



NOTICE OE MEETING. 

The Executive Board of the South- 
ern Convention Women will meet in 
Suffolk, Virginia, for a semi-annual 
session on Tuesday, March 8, at 2 :00 
p. m. Mrs. 0. H. Paris, president, 
asks that all members be present. 



WORLD DAY OF PRAYER, MARCH 4. 

Join with women around the world 
on this day and make your prayer one 
for lasting peace everywhere. Women 
could bring peace if they wanted to 
and tried hard enough. 

The service, written partly by a 
Chinese woman, is built around the 
theme, "The Lord Is Thy Keeper." 
Beginning with Psalm 121, it ends 
with the hymn, "0 Jesus I Have 
Promised." Through participation in 
this service, may we be true followers 
of our Lord, Jesus Christ. May we be 
concerned for definite persons, believ- 
ing that the power of God can change 
human nature, and may we pray in 
conclusion : ' ' Revive Thy Church be- 
ginning with me — just now. ' ' 

Let us all make a special effort to 
attend a World Day of Prayer service 
on March 4. While there, Ave might 
think of those to whom our offering is 
sent: Christian training for Ameri- 
can Indians, Christian training for 
Negroes in America, work among mi- 
grants, Christian literature for peo- 
ple who have just learned to read, 
gifts to Christian colleges and schools 
in India, Japan, and work among il- 
literates. Surely we are making great 
investments here. 

The World Day of Prayer began 
with Mary, the mother of Jesus, as 
she prayed The Magnificat found in 
Luke 1:46-55. In 1948, the service 
went to 74 countries, and offerings 
have already amounted to $195,000, 
the largest ever. In 1949, we can 
think on these words: "Verily, veri- 
ly, I say unto you, he that believeth 
on me, the works that I do shall he do 
also ; and greater works than these 
shall he do, because I go unto my 
Father" (John 14:12). 

If you cannot attend a service on 
the World Day of Prayer, join with 
others around the world in a prayer 
for peace. Here is part of the Daily 
Prayer of High Resolve : 

"In hatred of war and its killing 
we are united. Hold us to a new high 
unity, our Father, and in that unity 
give us grace to change our behavior 
that wars may cease and Thy King- 
dom come. Grant us strength to melt 
our pride into humility, to change our 
race and class prejudice into fellow- 
ship, to turn our selfishness into shar- 



Page Nine. 

ing. Rewrite into our hearts the sure 
knowledge that Thine is the Kingdom 
and Thine the power. 

' ' In this chill hour of the world 's 
winter of indecision, grant to all man- 
kind the shining courage to follow the 
difficult road of the man of Galilee, 
the Christ of Calvary — our Lord." 
Amen. 

If you do not attend a service, make 
this your prayer on Friday, March 4. 



WAKE CHAPEL. 

Our Women's Missionary Society 
at Wake Chapel is making progress 
and we are happy to report good at- 
tendance and interest in the programs 
presented monthly, following along 
the theme, "Horizons Unlimited" as 
given in the packet. 

At a special meeting held on Mon- 
day evening, January 31, Miss Pat- 
tie Lee Coghill was with us and re- 
viewed "Twilight or Dawn." Need- 
less to say she thrilled our hearts as 
we listened to her report on our mis- 
sion work in China today. Eighteen 
of our members and two visitors en- 
joyed a bountiful covered dish supper 
and an hour of fellowship together 
prior to her review. 

For onr February program we 
used a film on China which was an 
especially good follow-up of the book 
review. We are using for our devo- 
tions the study book on Galatians. La- 
ter we hope to have our pastor give us 
a summary-review on this book. 

Plans are being made for a joint 
World Day of Prayer service with the 
other churches of onr town on the 
fourth of March. 

Mrs. Garland Ransdell, 
President. 



HAPPY HOME REPORTS. 

Our year so far, has been busy, hav- 
ing already given Friendly Service 
gifts to the Indian Mission School, 
and sponsored a Thanksgiving ban- 
quet for the Pilgrim Fellowship. 

Our Thank Offering service was 
given at the regular worship service, 
giving the church opportunity to 
share in the offering for C.W.V.R. 

The Home and Foreign Mission 
study book reviews have already been 
given by two of our members. 

The two adult Sunday School 
Classes (which most of our members 
attend) assemble jointly each Sunday 
morning for the Bible Study, "The 
Gospel Unlimited." 

We sponsored the pruning of the 
shrubbery on the church grounds, in 
(Continued on page 15.) 



Page Ten. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 3, 1949. 



FOR THE CHILDREN 

Mrs. R. L. House, Editor 



Young Friends: 

Tomorrow (Friday) will be the 
World Day of Prayer. We have been 
having these prayer days for a long 
time. The mothers, grandmothers and 
aunts are the ones responsible for this 
day. It is a time when the men do 
not plan or lead the service. 

This year we have been studying 
about China and three wonderful Chi- 
nese women planned the program. 
They decided which scripture, prayers 
and theme should be used. Part of 
the money that the women bring will 
go to China for Christian teaching. 

Our good friend, Mrs. Frank H. 
Peters of Ohio has sent a poem for 
the day : 

Prayer for Children. 

For all the little children 
Who need our tender care, 
We offer our petition 
On this World Day of Prayer. 
Many we know are homeless, 
Hungry and sad and cold. 
Gather them close our Father 
Into Thy loving fold. 
Keep those who are neglected 
From suffering and from harm 
Gather them all in safety 
In Thine encircling arm. 
May He who in tender mercy 
Said suffer them all to come. 
Guide them and give them shelter 
At last in Thy heavenly home. 

It was good of Mrs. Peters to write 
this poem and to send it for this day. 
See how many things women and girls 
can do! Keep homes, care for chil- 
dren, teach, write poems and work in 
church. I am glad that we are a part 
of a denomination that allows women 
to be ordained and to hold high posi- 
tions in the church. Our moderator 
(like a president) is Miss Helen Ken- 
yon. Few women have held such an 
office in any church in our country. 

I hope that more and more bovs and 
girls will think of choosing the church 
as their life work. There are churches 
which need choir directors, organists, 
secretaries, leaders of religious edu- 
cation — all of which can be done by 
trained women. Men can serve in 
these wavs as well as being ministers. 



THE FAITH OP A LITTLE CHILD. 

(Anonymous.) 

Issued by the National Kindergarten 
Association. 
Fear often seems to be the first 
mental problem which one has to com- 
bat in raising a child. 



When our little girl, Gloria, was a 
baby, we made up our minds that the 
word fear should never -be used in any 
connection before her and that every 
effort should be made to have her 
grow up without a knowledge of that 
emotion. However, this was not to be. 

When Gloria was about two-and-a- 
half years old, we had a little French 
maid to whom she became very much 
attached. Gloria jabbered to her con- 
stantly, and the maid put on a show 
of listening by keeping up a steady 
response of, ' ' Oui, oui ! ' ' This so de- 
lighted the child that she soon named 
the maid Oui-oui. 

All seemed to be well, until sud- 
denly, without warning, we became 
aware that Oui-oui was having a joke 
of her own by frightening Gloria with 
stories about a little black dog. We 
noticed that each time we asked Glo- 
ria to go to another room for some- 
thing after the darkness of evening 
had barely begun to approach, she 
would reply, with the evidence of 
dread suffusing her countenance, "No, . 
no, 'ittle b'ack dog." We Avere hor- 
rified. 

Realizing the seriousness of the sit- 
uation — that, unless she was recondi- 
tioned, fear at this tender age might 
produce ill effects that would never be 
overcome — we spent anxious moments 
wrestling with the problem. Under 
the existing conditions we could no 
longer exclude the word fear and its 
meaning from the child's vocabulary; 
we had to bring this hidden difficulty 
out into the open and unmask it. 

We found that Gloria was afraid of 
the dark only when alone, so as she 
had been taught that God was an- 
other Father — as loving as her own 
daddy, and much wiser and much 
more powerful — we told her that God 
would protect her wherever she hap- 
pened to be, in the dark as well as in 
the light. 

One winter evening, a short time 
before her bedtime, I sent her on an 
errand to a little sewing room under 
the front stairs. She went to the 
open doorway between the living 
room and the hall and then stopped ; 
there was no light in the hall or in 
the sewing room — only a faint glim- 
mer from a light in the upper bal- 
cony. 

"Go on, dear." I called out. 
'"Fraid; dark, Mamma; fraid!" 



"No, dear," I replied, and I did 
not go to her. "It is not very dark 
in there, and, besides, you know God 
is in the dark as well as in the light. ' ' 

There had been no mention from 
Gloria of the " 'itlle b'ack dog," so I 
felt we had gained something. 

The dear child ,in simple trust, ad- 
vanced one step — slowly; again she 
took a step and stopped. Then she 
cried out, ' ' Dod, oh Dod, I 'm a tom- 
in ' ! " and she paddled boldly ahead 
and went into the dark sewing room. 

That moment will always be re- 
called by me with a great thrill of 
joy. Gloria had become conscious 
that she was not alone — that the 
strong, loving Father would be wher- 
ever she had to go — and all fear had 
vanished. 



SAVING SOIL AND SAVING LIVES. 

The earth is man's rightful domain, 
but history proves that man has not 
properly kept the earth, since he has 
permitted large portions of it to go 
to waste, opening a possibility of star- 
vation — the very thing which man 
first set out to avoid. Next to disease, 
man lias always had himself as his 
worst enemy. Apparently this enemy 
has been his inability to use his intel- 
lect for preservation of the earth com- 
mitted to his care. 

Wherever man has touched the 
earth it has broken down and washed 
away. A path to a cabin means the 
beginning of a gully that may be des- 
tined to destroy the whole hillside. 
Until recent times man has not wor- 
ried about erosion of soil for he could 
move when his land no longer pro- 
duced. Growth of population and 
other economic factors have overtaken 
him in his flight from less productive 
to more fertile acres. He is now forced 
to rebuild rather than migrate. 

Saving the nation's soil is an engi- 
neering job, but efforts of engineers 
must be supplemented by man's love 
for the soil, his willingness to co- 
operate, and a vision to realize the 
size and importance of the problem. 

All this becomes more thought-pro- 
voking when it is realized that the 
United States is helping to feed the 
world. And tragic is the thought of 
what would have happened in many 
portions of Europe during recent 
years had it not been for soil produc- 
tion in this country. 

The relation of saving the soil and 
saving lives is not far to seek. These 
tw r o savings are becoming more and 
more inseparable, and the church has 
an important stake in both. 

C. B. Riddle. 



March 3, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Eleven. 



Youth at Work in the Church 

I Ann Truitt, Editor; Helen Jackson, C. B. Twidi>y, Assoiates. 



FOR YOUNG ADULTS. 

An excellent handbook on young 
adult programs is now ready for use 
in 1949. The title is The Young Adult 
Fellowships Guide Book for 1949. 

Written by Oscar J. Rumpf of the 
B. & R. Church, it was planned in 
consultation with our Congregational 
Joint Committee on Older Youth and 
Young Adult Program. 

It offers a year's program sugges- 
tions in these four areas : Basic Top- 
ics ; Bible Themes ; Mission Study ; 
and Young Adult Specialities. 

There is a brief introductory chap- 
ter on such questions as : Who are 
these Young Adults ? Where are they ? 
What are they thinking about? How 
to get an organization started, etc. 

Attractively printed, well illustrat- 
ed, 28 pages. 25c. 

Order from 14 Beacon Street, Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, or 19 South La- 
Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois. 

Young Laymen — Young Church. 
By John Oliver Nelson of the Fed- 
eral Council. 160 pages. Associated 
Press. $1.75. Stocked by the Pilgrim 
Press. 

Reports in vivid form things young 
adults are actually doing in such areas 
as: 

We Argued Belief in God. 

We Opened Our Bibles. 

We Traced Current Theologies. 

We Sent a Missionary. 

We Joined the World Church. 

We Made Vocations Out of Jobs. 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. 
(Continued from page 2.) 
Messenger of the Evangelical and Re- 
formed Church will speak the second 
night on The Church and Its Place 
in the Modern World. A great pa- 
geant is planned for the third eve- 
ning's program, to depict the work 
of our denominations in this day and 
age. A communion service will close 
the conference on the last evening. It 
will be conducted by Dr. Goebel and 
Dr. Truman Douglas of our own 
Board of Home Missions. There will 
be inspiring worship services led by 
Dean William Faulkner of Fisk Uni- 
versity. Some of the members of the 
two youth fellowships will lead the 
worship in the opening session of the 
conference. 



Afternoons will be given over to 
creative recreation and skill work- 
shops. Children's workers will find 
amazing help under the guidance of 
expert leadership in their laboratory 
and workshop sessions, where they 
will learn techniques and skill in ways 
of working with children. There will 
be various assembly meetings in the 
afternoon periods — a time for laymen, 
laywomen, church school superinten- 
dents, youth, and students, to get to- 
gether in their respective groupings 
for mutual benefit to their total pro- 
grams. 

The various state conferences in 
our denomination have been given 
quotas of delegates. If you are in- 
terested in attending this meeting, 
please contact the State Conference 
Headquarters, or write to the Rev. 
Henry R. Rust, 14 Beacon Street, Bos- 
ton 8, Massachusetts. He is the Pro- 
gram Director and will be glad to re- 
ceive your registration or your ques- 
tions about the conference. Lakeside, 
Ohio, is an adequate conference cen- 
ter. It will be a happy time for the 
delegates who can be there on the 
shores of Lake Erie for this National 
Conference on Christian Education. 
The average cost per delegate will be 
$27.50. You will want to register for 
this conference early. The deadline 
for registration is April 1. 



EDITORIAL. 
(Continued from page 4.) 
cooperative enterprises, including sur- 
veys, visitation evangelism, radio and 
union meetings. Greatest of all its 
resoures, " he pointed out, "are its 
members, known and unknown, who 
are eager to see the church do its job 
and are equally eager to do their 
part." 

With the need, the opportunity and 
the resources, the final step is to get 
them together and to work. For this, 
Dr. Hoskins has the practical sugges- 
tion of establishing a major board in 
each church, comparable to that of a 
Board of Deacons or Trustees, whose 
primary responsibility will be to in- 
itiate, guide and motivate the church's 
evangelistic emphases. 

This Board would plan and place 
responsibility for continuous collec- 
tion of names of people of all ages for 



whom the church has a responsibility. 
Obviously this would include those 
who sometime should become mem- 
bers, those already members, but still 
to be converted and those who are car- 
ried on the rolls in the category of 
questionable or absentee members. 

Another duty of this membership 
board would be to assign members the 
task of inviting others, believed spir- 
itually ready to affiliate with the 
church. One church has for this task 
a group of people known as The Fel- 
lowship of the Concerned. They take 
the names of persons assigned and 
stay with them a month, or a year or 
two years, or whatever length of time 
maybe required to consummate the 
commission. 

Still another job of this suggested 
Membership Board would be to see 
that all new members, young or old, 
from whatever church or from no 
church, are given adequate instruc- 
tion in their faith. 

Considerable experience at this 
point demonstrates that people are 
eager to learn Avhat the church stands 
for, how it operates, what it aspires to 
do and what it expects of its mem- 
bers. A Pastor's Class for children 
lasting one, two or three years, hap- 
pily is becoming standard practice. 

This board would take responsibili- 
ty for carefully and intelligently in- 
tegrating the new members into the 
worship, the life and work of the 
church. It will make a plan and place 
responsibility for the continual effort 
to relate absentee members to 
churches where they currently are 
living. Similarly it will make a plan 
and place responsibility for re-kind- 
ling of the fires of devotion in the 
hearts of that sad group of persons 
who are members of the church in 
name only. 

In closing, Dr. Hoskins said, ' ' The 
church's evangelistic emphases, how- 
ever they are made, are out in the 
areas where every Christian's Chris- 
tianity is put on trial. It is the criti- 
cal, sensitive, growing edge of the 
Kingdom. Every sermon, every teach- 
er, every officer, every member is rele- 
vant to success or failure." 



As the stag which the huntsman 
has hit flies through bush and brake, 
over stock and stone, thereby exhaust- 
ing his strength, but not expelling the 
deadly bullet from his body, so does 
experience show that they who have 
troubled consciences run from place 
to place, but carry with them wher- 
ever they go their dangerous wounds. 

— Gotthold. 



Page Twelve. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 3, 1949. 



Sunday School Lesson 

By Rev. H. S. Hardcastle, D. D. 



JESUS' MINISTRY TO HUMAN 
NEED. 

Lesson XI— March 13, 1949. 

Memory Selection : I came that they 
may have life., and have it abun- 
dantly. — John 10:10. 

Lesson : Mark 5 ; 6 :3-44 ; Luke 7 : 
18-23; 19:1-10. 

Devotional Reading : Matthew 25 : 
34-46. 

The lesson for today shows Jesus 
meeting human need on several levels. 
It also shows Him as Master over Na- 
ture, over disease, over death. He is 
indeed able to supply all our need ac- 
cording to the riches in glory by 
Christ Jesus. 

The Sick in Mind. 

The story of the healing of the 6a- 
darene demoniac brings help and hope 
to many modern men and women. For 
not only are there thousands of people 
in institutions for the mentally ill, but 
there are even more thousands outside 
such institutions whose lives are a tan- 
gle and jangle, and who are living at 
sixes and sevens with themselves and 
with others. There are those who are 
sick in mind as well as those who are 
sick in body. And in many instances 
the tragedy is greater. Indeed one of 
the worst features of mental illness is 
that both those who suffer from it, 
and the members of their family, feel 
a deep sense of shame because of it. 

To be sure God does not heal every 
case. The point of the story is, how- 
ever, that Jesus has power to bring or- 
der to a disordered mind, power to 
east out the unclean spirits of fear 
and worry and vindictiveness and 
many other ills of the human mind. 
Religion can play a large part in 
mental health. God has not given us 
the spirit of fear . . . but of a sound 
mind. As Dr. Fosdick put it, the re- 
ligion of healthy-mindedness. Faith 
is the secret of many cures. In his 
book, A Guide to Confident Living, 
Dr. Peale shows how again and again 
religion has helped and can help in 
cases of mental illness and troubled 
minds. Mental illness is getting far 
more attention in our time than here- 
tofore, not only because there is more 
of it, but because mental hygienists 
have learned the place and power of 
religion and religious faith in the 
healing process. 



Jesus and Death. 
The story of the raising of Jairus' 
daughter has many interesting and 
helpful truths. In the critical hour 
when his only daughter lay at the 
point of death this man instinctively 
turned to Jesus. He had a great faith 
— he believed that Jesus could save 
his daughter. But his faith must have 
suffered a great shock when word 
came to him on the way back home 
that his little girl was dead. It was 
quickened again however by Jesus 
who bade him not to fear but to have 
faith. And his faith was rewarded, 
for Jesus demonstrated his power and 
sovereignty over death by calling the 
damsel back to life again. To be sure 
not every critically ill girl of that age, 
or of any age is cured before she dies 
or brought back to life here after she 
dies. But here is the pledge that 
death does not have the last word over 
life. Indeed death is as much a part 
of life as is birth. And Christ has 
power over death. He hath brought 
life and immortality to light through 
His glorious gospel and through his 
resurrection. 

Jesus and Disease. 

Mark introduces an intelude to the 
story of the healing of Jairus' daugh- 
ter by the story of the healing of the 
woman who had an issue of blood for 
twelve long years, who was no better, 
in fact was worse, even though she 
had consulted many doctors. At the 
mere touch of her hand on the hem of 
His garment the woman was healed. 
The story does not condemn physi- 
cians. They are God's healers or 
helpers in healing. And modern med- 
icine is doing miracles every day in 
healing the sick. The story simply 
shows that Jesus is Master over dis- 
ease, that He is concerned with meet- 
ing human need at the level of bodily 
health, that ultimately it is He who 
healeth all our diseases. And there 
are many instances where God has 
healed and raised up people after the 
doctors themselves have felt that there 
was nothing else that they could do. 
Furthermore in this as in the other 
cases in today's lesson there is a 
marked emphasis on faith in the heal- 
ing process. Faith has curative pow- 
er. Even faith that borders on su- 
perstition helps. But the story in no 
way gives any encouragement to those 



who have no faith in doctors, to those 
who resort only to faith in the crises 
and emergencies of life. If my wife 
or my child became ill, even if not 
critically ill, I would call a doctor. 
And I would be showing my faith in 
my works. I would do everything I 
could as if everything depended upon 
me, and I would pray as if everything 
depended on God. 

Jesus and the Hungry. 
The feeding of the five thousand 
also has many interesting truths. But 
the central truth is Jesus' response 
to human needs as manifested in hun- 
ger. As He stood before that multi- 
tude which had had nothing to eat all 
day, and which was hungry, He was 
moved with compassion, and He 
moved into action. Jesus has a deep 
concern for the hungry people of the 
world. And His followers and His 
Church are truly expressing His spir- 
it when they are seeking to feed the 
hungry people of the world. It is 
significant, however, that it was the 
need for the things of the spirit that 
moved the Master first. It was when 
He saw the multitudes as sheep with- 
out a shepherd that He began to teach 
them many things. Mere material 
things will not meet the needs of the 
world. Man cannot live by bread 
alone. And even as we try to give 
the hungry bread, we need also to 
give them the Bread of Life. 

The Marks of His Ministry. 
Poor old John the Baptist ! It was he 
who had announced the coming of the 
Messiah and who had bade men get 
ready for His coming*. But when 
Herod put Him into prison, doubt and 
despondency laid hold upon him. 
Then, too, Jesus was not acting like 
the Messiah ought to act, He was not 
doing the things that John said He 
would do. So John sent two of his 
disciples to Jesus to ask if He really 
were the Messiah, or whether they 
were to look for another. In reply 
Jesus told John 's disciples to tell their 
master what they had seen. And 
what had they seen indeed ? Well the 
blind were seeing, the lame were walk- 
ing, lepers were being cleansed, deaf 
people were hearing again, even the 
dead were being raised again. But 
the climax and the crowning feature 
was the fact that poor were having the 
gospel or the good news preached to 
them. 1'h ere are many ways in which 
the church can bear witness to its 
faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, but 
unless it is doing the things Jesus did, 
its witness is not effcetive. It must 
meet human needs at all levels if it is 
to be true to the Lord Jesus Christ. 



March 3, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Thirteen. 



THE CALL OF CHRIST IS THE 
CALL TO EVANGELIZE. 
(Continued from Page 5.) 

church where I no longer live I am 
not really a part of the church. 1 am 
required to pay taxes where I live. 
I must send my children to the school 
of the district where I now make my 
home. The law requires me to be- 
come a part of the community which 
has become my home. 

Do we treat religion in a manner 
inferior to that in which we treat 
taxes or schools? The church is not 
a past sentiment, but a present ac- 
tivity. If I keep my name on the 
church roll "back home" I am hurt- 
ing that church. Its apportionment 
for various needs is based partly upon 
the number of names on the roll and 
the other members must pay my share. 
My name on the roll of a church in 
which I am no longer active also gives 
that church a false sense of bigness 
which is harmful. 

Keeping my name on the church roll 
where I used to live not only hurts 
that church, but it harms the church 
where I am now living. I tend to be 
inactive in the church where I live. 
That church needs me. It should be 
my church home. Even if I attend its 
services and try to take part in its 
program I have no vote and cannot 
hold office — it is not my church. I 
am not in any church. I am like a 
man without a country. Being defi- 
nitely a part of the local church makes 
me a more thoughtful, consecrated 
Christian. 

This is true whether there is a 
church of the denomination of my 
childhood in my community or not. 
Why do I belong to the particular de- 
nomination I do? It is largely by 
chance, not because my denomination 
is better than another. I should put 
Christianity above denomination. 
Therefore I should become an active 
member of the church in the commun- 
ity in which I find myself, regardless 
of what tag is on the church building. 

One denomination automatically 
puts its members on the church roll 
of the community to which they 
move. In a city each church is as- 
signed certain streets or blocks. If a 
member moves across the street into 
the territory of another local church 
his membership is immediately rtans- 
ferred to the church in whose section 
he now lives. That denomination in- 
sists that a Christian belongs to some- 
thing much larger than the single or- 
ganization. While we do not use that 
method, the principle is right. 

In one of the most active churches 



of our Southern Convention new 
members make a pledge to God which 
reads : "In order that I may remain 
an effective Christian, I promise that 
if and when I shall move from the 
area served by this church I shall im- 
mediately ask for a letter of transfer 
to the church of my choice in the 
community to which I shall have 
moved. ' ' 

How many churches of our South- 
ern Convention are thus putting ac- 
tice Christianity above sentimental 
attachment to the individual church 
of our childhood? Every Christian 
should do this. The person who puts 
Christianity above sentiment will ask 
that his membership be transferred to 
the church of the community in which 
he now lives. 

W. W. Sloan. 



LAY EVANGELISM. 

It is a real joy to prepare a good 
size prospect list, stick it back in your 
head, and in the corner of your desk, 
and then pray over it. In my experi- 
ence a prospect list should be made 
bravely. It should contain those who 
have long walked outside the church, 
and have been often approached about 
making a decision for Christ, and 
have not done so. It should contain 
the names of those whom no one ex- 
pects to unite with the church, or at 
least this particular church. Natural- 
ly it should include the names of all 
those people who attend the church 
or Sunday school but have not yet 
united with the church. Little chil- 
dren in Sunday school are often a lead 
to parents who are prospects. And it 
should have on it the names of people 
new in the community and those who 
haye selected no church home, wheth- 
er new or otherwise. This list should 
be bravely, carefully and faithfully 
made. It should be a list gotten from 
many sources but tactfully and in the 
spirit of love and common sense. This 
list should be used, renewed, followed 
up, and kept up to date at all times. 

It is a job to ask a few of those who 
have the interest of the church deeply 
at heart, who want to win others to 
Christ, and who have a good spirit of 
cooperation, to come for a session of 
instruction and prayer. This meet- 
ing may be held in the pastor's study, 
or any other proper place, but it 
should be a "place apart" where deep 
and sweet fellowship may make for 
divine teamwork. If they will ex- 
press themselves as to what they think 
of working to win others, of what part 
businesslike measuring of the oppor- 
tunity should play, the manner of 



preparing prospect lists and their val- 
ue if any; and volunteering of the 
names of persons whom they would 
suggest as prospects. There should 
be prayer, last and always — prayer 
thanking God for the privilege of 
working in His Kingdom, gratitude 
for His help and blessing, and a 
prayer for the guidance of the Holy 
Spirit in the work at hand. Now no- 
tice that I am not thinking of a spe- 
cial evangelistic campaign necessari- 
ly, but rather a constant expectancy 
toward the receiving of new members 
into the fellowship of the church all 
along during the year. However, I 
do feel that it is good to set a certain 
Sunday, a few weeks or perhaps not 
more than a month ahead, wherein 
you will receive the new members into 
the church. 

Then in that quiet place let the pas- 
tor go over names of the prospects 
with the thought of having those in 
this inner group choose to take cer- 
tain ones whom they feel impressed 
to call on, and then let them go out 
after them. They will want to con- 
sider what they are doing, and do it 
at the appropriate time and place. It 
is good if they will "close the deal" 
with the prospect, getting his promise 
to make his public commitment and 
received into Church at a given time. 
However, each of these lay workers 
will find the pastor ready to help them 
if they need it. They should com- 
plete the job as nearly as they can 
and leave more difficult cases to the 
pastor. Frequently the worker will 
feel that it is easy to go just so far 
with the prospect and leave the final 
results up to the minister. There is 
great joy and greater service if he 
takes some pride in completing the 
job. I am happy that there has al- 
ways been in the churches I have had 
the privilege of serving some men 
and women, yes, and young people, 
who were willing to do this kind of 
personal work for their church and 
the Christ. 

John G. Truitt. 



Life in this world is only a choice 
of difficulties. If we avoid them in one 
direction, it is but to meet them in an- 
other. It is hard to be a Christian, 
but it is harder not to be ! When those 
who have once seen the vision and 
"tasted the heavenly gift" draw back, 
they invite experiences with which 
the trials of the saint are light and 
sweet. The really "hard" thing is 
to "kick against the pricks." The 
way of the transgressor is hard. 

— Robinson. 



Page Fourteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 3, 1949. 



lajaiajaaiMaMia^'aMaiaMaMajajsiajaisiaiafSEja 

SThe Orphanage I 
Chas. D. Johnston, Supt. | 

Dear Members of The Sun Family : 
It is with a feeling of sadness that 
we pass on to you this week's Or- 
phanage Letter. It was written by 
one who even then was concerned be- 
cause of the illness of a little child. 
Yet before the letter had reached the 
office in Richmond, its writer, who 
had been "father" to so many or- 
phan children had gone to be with 
his Father in the world beyond. 

The writer's heart is sad because a 
friend of many years has gone away. 
He was my friend when I was a child. 
He has always been a friend of chil- 
dren. 

May we show our appreciation of 
this great, good man by continuing 
our support of the work which was his 
constant care. 

J. T. K. 

# * # 

Dear Friends : 

Last week little Rachel Wilkins be- 
came very ill. (You remember read- 
ing in my letter more than a year ago 
how she and her little brother were 
rescued from a burning building in 
Virginia.) She was running a fever 
of about one hundred, four and one- 
half degrees. The matron in her 
building called me and I went up to 
see her. Now when a little child gets 
real sick we feel our heavy responsi- 
bility more and more. I sat down by 
her bedside and looked at her. She 
was so sick and hot with fever and 
could not retain anything on her 
stomach. We had the doctor to come 
to see her and he prescribed for her. 
We tried out different fruit juices and 
the doctor's medicine, but nothing 
seemed to stick, and did not for sev- 
eral days. But she is very much bet- 
ter at this writing. 

Anyone's heart would go out to a 
little helpless child under such cir- 
cumstances; her father dead and her 
mother quite a distance from here and 
could not come to see her. But she 
is an inmate of the orphanage family 
and will have the best of care. 

The money you send to the Chris- 
tian Orphanage is used to care for and 
train little homeless and dependent 
children. The orphanages in North 
Carolina are giving a home and train- 
ing to nearly four thousand children, 
and still there are appeals to take 
more. Not a week passes that we are 
not called upon to take some li+tle 
child ; many of them very worthy 



cases. We do not have room to meet 
all the requests, and neither do we 
have funds for their support. The 
only thing that would make me want 
to be rich would be to help others who 
are in real need, especially little chil- 
dren. 

The weather during the last days 
of February have been pretty, and it 
gives us the garden. But we realize 
the weather man has some cold rainy 
days in store for us in the month of 
March. Your writer well remembers 
about fifty-five years ago that the 
trees had budded out and the woods 
were green by the last of March, and 
on the first of April there came a 
storm and cleared off and then turned 
cold, and there came a freeze which 
killed the buds and the woods turned 
black instead of green. Our wheat 
and oats are looking so pretty and 
green that we hope we will have no 
such weather this year. 

Chas. D. Johnston, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT FOR MARCH 3, 1949. 
Sunday School Monthly Offerings. 

Amount brought forward $1,215.99 

Eastern Va. Conference : 

Newport News 8. S $11.50 

Rosemont 43.00 

Rosemont (Simmons chil- 
dren) 25.00 

Oakland S. S 15.00 

94.50 

N. C. & Va. Conference: 

Durham S. S $27.62 

Long's Chapel 8.00 

35.62 

Western N . C. Conference : 

Ether S. S $ 5.51 

Randleman S. S 23.87 

29.38 

Va. Valley Conference: 
Newport S. S 17.10 

Total this week from churches $ 176.60 



Total this year from churches $1 
Special Offerings. 

Amount brought forward $2 

Mrs. Sullo, children $26.12 

Mrs. Gregory, Marlene . . 35.00 
Suffolk Welfare Dept. . . . 30.00 

Sale of eggs 4.00 

Cash 1.50 

Church of the Covenant 

S. S. in Greensboro . . . 10.00 



392.59 
228.60 



Total this year from 
Special Offerings . 



106.62 



$2,335.22 



Grand total for the week ... $ 283.22 
Grand total for the year . . . $3,727.81 



NEWS OF ELON COLLEGE. 
(Continued from page 7.) 

either money, labor, or goodwill to 
this worthwhile undertaking. As we 
think of this job well done may we get 
ourselves ready for the next great un- 
dertaking for our college and church. 



APPORTIONMENT GIVING. 

It certainly is not news that there 
are fifty-two weeks in the calendar 
year but it would be good news if 
every Sunday school and church in 
the Convention could make a payment 
on their college apportionments at 
least once a month, if not once a 
month once a quarter every fifth Sun- 
day. If payments are made by the 
quarter they should be sufficient size 
to make up for the other two months 
in the quarter. 

The college program is continuous 
throughout the year. We take two 
weeks ' vacation at Christmas, a week 's 
vacation during holidays, and ten 
days between the regular college ses- 
sion and summer school. Even when 
school is not actually in session ex- 
penses are practically the same. There 
is no let up in the cost of running a 
college. The sources of support for 
the church-related college are limited 
and not too generous. Elon College 
has always depended to a certain ex- 
tent on the church for its support. 
Today the college finds itself in need 
of additional funds to keep current 
accounts balanced. Even though con- 
tributions are small they mean much 
to the college and the college is most 
appreciative of the cooperation and 
support of the church. 
Previously reported $1,372.10 

Eastern N. C. Conference: 
Mt. Auburn S. S. & Church 26.46 

Eastern Va. Conference: 

Oakland S. S 17.22 

Richmond, First 50.00 

N. O. & Va. Conference : 

Durham S. S 23.01 

Long's Chapel 2.00 

Pfafftown 18.00 

Va. Valley Conference: 
Newport S. S 18.54 

Total $ 155.23 

Grand total $1,527.33 



Little progress can be made by 
merely attempting to repress what is 
evil; our great hope lies in develop- 
ing what is good. 

— Calvin Coolidge. 



Each month a "picture of the 
month" is chosen by the Protestant 
Motion Picture Council and by The 
Christian Herald. As its March se- 
lection PMPC presents The Boy With 
Creen Hair. This is the story of a 
twelve-year-old boy, ' ' charmingly and 
convincingly played by young Dean 
Stockwell." Each month a small 
bronze plaque is presented to the pro- 
ducer, this month's going to RKO. 



March 3, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Fifteen. 



MARRIED 

+++++++++++++++++*++++++++++ 
JERNIGAN -REGISTER. 

The wedding of Miss Maude Elizabeth 
Jeniigan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher 
Lee Jernigan of Godwin, and the Bev. Fred 
Page Register, son of Mr. and Mrs. John 
H. Register of Sanford, and pastor of Wake 
Chapel Christian Church at Varina, took 
place Friday, November 12, at 6:30 o'clock 
in an attractive candlelight service in Whit- 
ley Auditorium at Elon College. Dr. Jesse 
H. Dollar, pastor of the church, performed 
the double ring ceremony. 

After the ceremony a reception was held 
in the living room of West Dormitory where 
the bride and groom received their guests. 
Mrs. A. L. Hook and Miss Lila Clare New- 
man served cake and punch, with Misses 
Evelyn Booth, Barbara Hayes, Shirley Joy- 
ner, Millie Johnson and Mrs. Carl Stouffer 
assisting. 

The bride is a senior at Elon, majoring 
in business administration, and a member of 
Tau Zeta Phi Sorority. 

The bridegroom, a graduate of Elon, Class 
of '46, was president of the student body 
and a member of Kappa Psi Nu Fraternity. 
He is currently pastor of Wake Chapel and 
Plymouth Church, Fuquay Springs and 
Amelia Church, Clayton. He is a student 
now at the Duke Divinity School. 



In Memoriam 



BEAMON. 

We, the members of Oak Grove Mission- 
ary Society were saddened September 25, 
1948 ,by the passing of our beloved friend, 
member and deacon, W. C. Beamon. 

To pay tribute and desiring to express 
love and respect from our church for one 
who served so faithfully and will be greatly 
missed by his many friends and neighbors 
and most of all by his family where he served 
as a devoted father and husband. 

Therefore, be it resolved: 

1. That we shall miss him in the sweet 
fellowship of our work together. We shall 
always cherish the memory of his friend- 
ship. 

2. That we are grateful for such a true 
friend and member, one who possessed such 
strong Christian character and lovable dis- 
position and such beautiful personality. 

3. That we extend to his bereaved family 
our heartfelt sympathy and commend them 
to the Great Comforter whose grace is suffi- 
cient for every need. And pray God's watch- 
ful care may sustain them. 

4. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent the family, a copy entered on our 
church record and a copy sent to The Chris 
tian Sun for publication. 

Mrs. T. R. ELLIS, 
Mrs. ELSIE EASON, 
Mrs. W. K. PARKER, 

Committee. 



HASLETT. 

Mrs. Julia Morgan Haslett, wife of J. J. 
Haslett, of Suffolk, Va., died February 14, 
in the Norfolk General Hospital after sev- 
eral months of illness. She was the daugh- 
ter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Lucius H. Mor- 



gan, members of Holy Neck Church. Be- 
side her husband she is survived by six sons, 
and one foster son: James E., Julian M., 
Thornton J., Lucius T., Carlton J. and Guy 
N., all of Suffolk, and a foster son, Fred 
Morgan, of Suffolk; two sisters, Mrs. Gar- 
land M. Faison and Mrs. Nell M. Gatling, 
both of Portsmouth ; five brothers, Spur- 
geon H. Morgan of Chicago, L. F. Morgan 
of Rocky Mount, N. C, V. R. Morgan of 
Elizabeth City, N. C, V. C. Morgan of 
Roanoke Rapids, N. C. and Jeptha S. Mor- 
gan of Suffolk ; and seven grandchildren. 

Mrs. Haslett was a good mother in a hap- 
py Christian home. She and Mr. Haslett 
served their sons faithfully throughout the 
days of their childhood and youth, and they 
saw to it that every comfort and kindness 
was returned to them. Her love for the 
Church was great, and her prayers for the 
well-being of all her loved ones were con- 
stant. Her family will greatly miss her, and 
her church and community are bereaved at 
her death. A large congregation of loved 
ones, neighbors and friends filled the church 
at her funeral ; and an unusually large num- 
ber of flowers brought comfort to the fam- 
ily. Her pastor spoke a brief message show- 
ing how God's promise of the crown of life 
to those who love Him had been vouchsafed 
to her in that already with her large family 
and God's blessings her life had been 
crowned. May the Father's love be ever 
upon those whom she has left behind. 

JOHN G. TRUITT, 

Pastor. 



POWELL. 

On Sunday evening, February 6, 1949, our 
Heavenly Father, who doeth all things well, 
saw fit to call from our midst, Mrs. Carey 
D. Powell, Sr., following several months of 
illness. Funeral services were held at Wake 
Chapel Church on Tuesday conducted by the 
pastor, the Rev. Fred Register, assisted by 
the Rev. J. Lee Johnson. 

Mrs. Powell was beloved and esteemed by 
a host of friends and neighbors. Surviving 
are her husband; four daughters, Mrs. C. B. 



Clark of Fuquay Springs, Mrs. Boyd Jones 
of Baltimore, Md., Mrs. C. A. Rowland of 
Varina, and Mrs. Linwood Forrest of Apex; 
eight sons, Rex. G., G. Ray, Horace C, Cary, 
Jr., Hoke C. and Douglas, all of Fuquay 
Springs, Eddie of Holly Springs and Dewey 
of Apex. 

In submission to the will of God and 
knowing that our loss is her eternal gain, we 
give thanks for her beautiful life which en- 
riched the hearts of all who knew her, and 
pray His richest blessings on each loved one. 

FRED P. REGISTER. 



CHURCH WOMEN AT WORK. 
(Continued from page 9.) 
cooperation with the High School Ag- 
ricultural Class, they doing the work 
as a class project. 

We will observe the World Day of 
Prayer. We plan to have Miss Eve- 
lyn S'trader speak to us in July. 

As yet, our society, being rural and 
widely scattered, has not been suc- 
cessful in observing World Commun- 
ity Day and May Fellowship Day. We 
would welcome any suggestions. 

Louise Sparks, 
Corresponding Sec'y. 

(Note : The editor of this page sug- 
gests that the May Fellowship Day 
and World Community Day programs 
might be used in the local society 
meetings, arid the entire membership 
of the church might also be invited. 
You might cooperate with other rural 
churches in your community, or invite 
them. Pot-Luck luncheons or suppers 
seem to be quite successful in some 
communities. Some of your mem- 
bers might attend services sponsored 
by the Council of Church Women in 
Reidsville. ) 



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We gladly submit estimates and drawings for a new 
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When building a new church, we will be only too 
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• 

Contact, our service department for a yearly main- 
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Builders of the four-manual Cathedral Organ in Main 
Street Methodist Church, Suffolk, Virginia. 



Page Sixteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 3., 1949. 



Plans for the United Evangelistic Advance of 1949-50 

Adopted by the Biennial Meeting of the Federal Council of 
Churches at Cincinniti, December 3, 1948 



The Christian Gospel is "good news" about 
God. Its background is bad news about men. 
The Gospel is both the clue to our under- 
standing of the Bible, which is above all else 
a book about the Gospel, and the core of the 
Christian revelation. The essence of the "good 
news" is not that God is love, or that He is 
Father. It is rather that the loving Father so 
loved that He gave His Son for the salvation 
of the world. The Gospel is news about some- 
thing that God did in history or rather of 
something He became in history, in Jesus 
Christ the "Word became flesh." The Gos- 
pel is thus "good news" about mighty acts of 
God in behalf of man, whereby God entered 
in Christ into the human struggle in history, 
created human perfection, made atonement 
for sin, conquered death in the Risen Christ 
and established by His Spirit a new Com- 
munion, the Christian Church. 

Evangelism is the presentation of the "good 
news" of God in Jesus Christ, through the 
power of the Holy Spirit, so that men may 
put their trust in God; accept Jesus Christ as 
their Saviour; follow and serve Him as their 
Lord in the fellowship of the Church and in 
the vocations of the common life. 

The basis for the Evangelistic Advance is 
the perennial need of all men for salvation 
from sin and perdition through the Gospel 
of Jesus Christ. This need is all the more 
evident in our precarious and tragic situation. 
The total claim of the Lord, Jesus Christ, lays 
an inescapable burden of responsibility on us 
relative to ourselves and our neighbors, and 
it will not let us rest in complacency, in the 
proclamation of a partial Gospel, or in the 
presentation of the Gospel to only a portion 
of the human race. Today, Christ calls His 
disciples in all the churches to proclaim the 
Gospel to every creature everywhere by word 
and by deed. 

While denominational programs of evan- 
gelism are still in progress, and evangelism is 
the continuous task of the churches, God has 
provided us an opportune time to engage in 
this work with a greater degree of unity be- 
tween October, 1949, and December 31, 1950, 
than heretofore. Denominational programs of 
evangelism which will then be in progress 



may easily blend with or be enhanced by The 
United Advance. The Advance will mark 
a natural culmination or fruition of all denom- 
inational programs. 

The year 1950 marks the end of the first 
half as well as the beginning of the second 
half of the twentieth century. This turn of 
time may well lead us to repent for the awful 
record of these past fifty years and to a re- 
birth of obedient faith through which God 
may bless us with His favor. 

Let it be frankly acknowledged that the 
effectiveness of the Advance will not be de- 
termined by any novelty of method, but by 
the prayer, preparation and consecration which 
we put into this opportunity which God has 
placed before us. In our evangelistic efforts 
we must become as much concerned about the 
quality and character of the evangelizing task 
as we are about reaching the vast numbers of 
unreached. In all of our activities for the Ad- 
vance we must keep uppermost in our minds 
its four major objectives: 

1. A spiritual quickening of the ministry 
and membership of our churches. Chris- 
tians today need to be motivated and 
empowered for their evangelistic respon- 
sibility. 

2. The reaching and winning of the vast 
unchurched multitudes of the nation 
for Christ and. His Church through 
every accepted means and method. 
The careful instruction and assimilation 
of every new member who is brought 
into the membership of the churches. 
The enlisting of all members who have 
moved to new communities and have 
failed to identify themselves with any 
local church where they now live, to 
the end that all the churched and the 
unchurched may be transformed by the 
power of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, 
thereby giving to society new creatures 
in the church, in the home, in business, 
in politics and in social relations. Dur- 
ing the fifteen months' period, special 
effort should be made to persuade the 
commitment of this unrelated group to 
the life and activities of some congre- 
gation. 



3. 



4. 



1844 - Over a Century of Service to the Denomination - 1949 

The CHRISTIAN 

ORGAN OF THE SOUTHERN CONVENTION OF CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 
In Essentials, Unity — In Non-Essentials, Liberty — In All Things, Charity 




Volume CI. 



RICHMOND, VA., THURSDAY MARCH 10, 1949. 



Number 10. 



CITATION PRESENTED TO UNITED CHURCH, RALEIGH 




As the 1949 Institute of Religion came to a close Tuesday of last week, Raleigh's United Church 
was honored by a citation presented it by the Board of Home Missions of the Congregational 
Christian Churches. The citation, shown here being given by Alfred Grant Walton of Brooklyn, 
New York, former president of the Board of Home Missions on the left, commended the Raleigh 
church for founding and maintaining its nationally-known Institute of Religion for ten years. 
Accepting the citation on the right is the Rev. Allyn P. Robinson, Jr., pastor of the United Church 
when the Institute was first launched. Looking on in the center is Supt. William T. Scott, who 
presented the award with Dr. Walton. Looking on at the right is the Rev. Frederick Eutsler, 
present pastor of United Church and observ ing on the left is Dr. Amiya Chakravarty, Indian Educa- 
tor and writer, who gave the feature address at the final session of the 1949 Institute. 

The citation reads in part: ". . . From this pulpit men and women of prophetic and statesman- 
like insights, tested by notable achievements, representing various fields of human interest, have dealt 
realistically, constructively and fearlessly with issues of local, regional, national and world concern. 
Here the unpopular as well as the popular, the controversial as well as the accepted points of view 
have found a free platform, conditioned only by the honesty and integrity of their exponents. 

"The United Church of Raleigh, small in membership and resources, yet great in prophetic in- 
sight and community service, denominational by tradition but ecumenical in spirit; of the South 
but truly of the nation, and an inspiration to free men everywhere who seek to know without fear 
or favor the will of Eternal God : 

"You have validated religion in the hearts and minds of thinking men who know full well 
that without the light of truth, democracy is doomed to die. Your Institute of Religion, with its 
classes, vital and illuminating, its lectures, avoiding the sensational but daring to be factual and 
challenging, its forum, characterized by democratic give and take, has won community support on 
its merits." (Times Photo by Ballance Studio.) 



Page Two. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 10, 1949. 



I News Flashes i 

The unmarried young people of 
high school age and over of our 
Lynchburg Church met recently to 
organize a "Miss and Mister Club." 



Mr. W. E. Briggs, one of our good 
laymen of the Reidsville (N. C.) 
Church, was the speaker at the church 
service in Reidsville on Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 27. 



Congratulations to Tommye Ring 
of our Winston-Salem Church as the 
winner of first place in presenting the 
alma mater song for the Reynolds 
High School of Winston-Salem. 

Church membership in the United 
States, in relation to population, 
stands at an all time high of 53 per 
cent. Sixty-three per cent of these 
are Protestants, 35 per cent are Cath- 
olics, and 6 per cent are Jewish. 



Miss Leila Anderson and Miss Pat- 
tie Lee Coghill have been leading very 
profitable Vacation Bible Institutes in 
Eastern Virginia and North Carolina. 
Sessions have been held in the Nor- 
folk area, Suffolk area, Henderson, 
Greensboro and Asheboro. 



Mrs. Frank C. Laubach, wife of the 
distinguished Congregational Chris- 
tian Missionary to the Philippines and 
other parts of the world, has been 
delighting audiences in North Caro- 
lina and Virginia with her strong 
messages during the past ten days. 



Dr. Mary Frances Thelen, profes- 
sor of religion at Randolph-Macon 
Woman's College, Lynchburg, and a 
member of our Lynchburg Church, is 
delivering a series of five lectures on 
"The Prophets," beginning March 3, 
in St. John's Episcopal Church in 
Lynchburg. Dr. Thelen is greatly 
interested in our church in Lynch- 
burg and is one of its most loyal mem- 
bers. 



Rev. E. Carl Brady, Robbins, N. 
C, is our new pastor at Niagara. Ser- 
vices will be held there under the 
leadership of Brother Brady on the 
first and third Sundays. Our Ni- 
agara Church is small, but an en- 
thusiastic group. They have main- 
tained an active Sunday school even 
though they have not had a pastor. 
Under the leadership of Brother Bra- 



dy we are confident this church will 
grow as the community develops. 



The ministers of the Eastern North 
Carolina Conference had a profitable 
meeting in Henderson on Tuesday, 
March 2. They met at the Congrega- 
tional Christian Church in Hender- 
son in the afternoon and enjoyed a 
delicious supper in the home of Rev. 
and Mrs. J. F. Apple. Those in at- 
tendance were : Rev. J. Frank Ap- 
ple, Rev. E. M. Carter, Rev. R. T. 
Grissom, Rev. T. Fred Wright, Rev. 
T. D. Sutton, Rev. C. Carl Dollar, 
Miss Pattie Lee Coghill Mrs. Frank 
C. Laubach, Miss Leila Anderson, 
Mrs. T. Fred Wright and Mrs. J. F. 
Apple. The ministers agreed that 
there should be a permanent organiza- 
tion and regular monthly meetings. 
Rev. R. T. Grissom was elected presi- 
dent and Rev. E. M. Carter was elect- 
ed secretary. The next meeting will 
be held at Shallow Well Church on 
Monday, April 4„ at 4 :00 o'clock. 



Dr. Gloria M. Wysner, secretary of 
the Committee for the Near and Mid- 
dle East of the Foreign Missions Con- 
ference of North America, left New 
York on March 2 for a two-month 
survey of mission work in ten foreign 
countries. Her itinerary includes vis- 
its to mission stations and conferences 
with church leaders and government 
officials in Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt, 
Turkey, Palestine, Iraq, Iran, Arabia, 
Trans-Jordan and the Anglo-Egyp- 
tian Sudan. Dr. Wysner will assist 
mission groups to develop cooperative 
mission projects in various fields of 
Christian activity. She also will ex- 
plore the possibilities for conducting 
a mass literacy program in North 
Africa, which later will be undertaken 
by Dr. Frank C. Laubach, noted mis- 
sionary educator, now in Siam. In 
Palestine, she will study refugee prob- 
lems with a view to assuring church 
boards in planning relief measures. 



RALEIGH CHURCH CITATION. 

In his remarks in regard to the 
presentation of the citation to the 
United Church, Raleigh, N. C, ap- 
pearing on the front page, S'upt. Scott 
told the church membership that "we 
have been led and encouraged by the 
presence and work of the United 
Church of Raleigh — dating back to 
Old Bethel Christian Church founded 
in Raleigh near 1800. 

"The union of the Christians, 
Friends and Congregationalists, form- 
ing the present United Church, has 
further demonstrated the commitment 



to broad and inclusive foundations 
laid by our fathers. 

"By your steady devotion to liber- 
ty ; by your steady and potent decla- 
ration of the principles of freedom, of 
truth and fellowship and right, you 
of the United Church have shed light 
upon the way in which we should walk 
as one people in one world. ' ' 



TRIAL IN BULGARIA. 

The President of the Federal Coun- 
cil of the Churches of Christ in Amer- 
ica declared that the "real issue" in 
the trial of 15 Protestant Church 
leaders in Bulgaria ' ' appears to be the 
conflict between loyalty to God and 
loyalty to an earthly power" as he 
urged all members of the 27 denomi- 
nations in the Federal Council's con- 
stituency to join in prayer for their 
"persecuted" brethren. 

The text of the statement by Bishop 
S'tamm, a bishop of the Evangelical 
United Brethren Church, follows : 

"Each day's developments make it 
clearer that there is a systematic at- 
tack upon churches in several coun- 
tries in the Soviet orbit. Wherever 
leaders of the church challenge or 
even assert independence of the to- 
talitarian regime, they are subjected 
to various kinds of persecution. This 
includes restricting freedom to preach 
the Word of God, hindering religious 
instruction of youth, prohibiting 
Christian youth movements, interfer- 
ing with training of clergy, arresting 
and imprisoning church leaders. The 
fifteen Protestant leaders who are un- 
der arrest in Bulgaria and who go on 
trial today illustrate the gravity of 
the situation. Although they may be 
technically on trial for violating cer- 
tain laws of the State, the real issue 
appears to be the conflict between loy- 
alty to God and loyalty to an earthly 
power. 

"Protestants throughout America 
will wish to express their sense of 
Christian fellowship with those who 
are bearing a Christian witness in the 
face of hostile forces. The only way 
in which we can help our Christian 
bi^ethren in this crisis is by our prayer 
for them and by manifesting a soli- 
darity of spirit with them. Whatever 
may be the outcome of the trials so 
far as their personal fortunes are con- 
cerned their Christian witness and 
faithfulness will not be in vain. 

"We remember also others who are 
suffering for conscience sake. In the 
present situation an attack upon the 
religious liberty of one group is an 
attack upon the religious liberty of 
all." 



Page Three. 

The Christian Sun 



March 10, 1949. THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Southern Convention Office 



Rev. Wm. T. Scott, Superintendent 



"ONE GREAT HOUR." 

Saturday night, March 26, at 10 :00 
o'clock (EST), will be one of the most 
significant hours in the history of 
Christendom. At that time One Great 
Hour, a radio broadcast, will be heard 
over the four major networks, CBS, 
NBC, ABC and Mutual, plus hun- 
dreds of non-network stations. Spon- 
sored by our Congregational Chris- 
tian Churches, together with more 
than twenty other Protestant, An- 
glican, and Eastern Orthodox com-, 
munions, One Great Hour will pre- 
sent famous people, powerful drama, 
thrilling music. Sixty minutes of 
Christian witness over the nation's 
radios will follow. Do not miss it ! 

One Great Hour will reverently 
dramatize Christ's redemptive and 
healing mission to mankind, featuring 
true-life examples of vital and co- 
operative mission work in Christ's 
name being done in Europe and Asia. 

The concrete aim of One Great 
Hour is to raise at least $10,000,000 
for Relief and Reconstruction services 
of the cooperating churches on Sun- 
day, March 27, the day after the 
broadcast. Our Congregational Chris- 
tian goal for that morning is $500,000 
for Relief and Reconstruction (form- 
erly CWVR) in Our Christian World 
Mission. The goal for the churches of 
the Southern Convention is $7,000. 

Here is a chance for us to use the 
radio for Jesus Christ and his re- 
demptive power. Here is a chance for 
whole families to join in one great 
witness. Here is a chance for us to 
respond to the pitiful cries of suffer- 
ing children, mothers and fathers 
across the seas for food, shelter, and* 
the bare necessities of life. 

Our people of the Southern Con- 
vention are earnestly urged to set 
aside 10:00 p. m., Saturday, March 
26, for One Great Hour. Our people 
are urged to gather around the radio 
and hear this great story of Christ's 
healing, and then they are asked to 
place their offerings for Relief and 
Reconstruction in the special offering 
envelopes and take them to Sunday 
school or church on Sunday morning, 
March 27, dropping them on the of- 
fering plate. Offering envelopes for 
every member of the family may be 
obtained from your pastor or Sunday 
school superintendent, or from the 



Southern Convention Office, Elon Col- 
lege, N. C. 

Don't fail to join with fifty million 
other radio listeners for One Great 
Hour, Saturday night March 26, at 
10 :00 o'clock. This will be the great- 
est cooperation program in recent 
church history and one of the most 
significant radio programs in the his- 
tory of radio. Let us make the radio 
the moutpiece of Jesus Christ in One 
Great Hour, and let us jofully place 
our liberal offerings on the offering 
plates of our church that the healing 
hand of our Lord may be taken 
throughout the whole wide earth. One 
Great Hour offerings should be sent 
to The Mission Board, Elon College, 
N. C, designated "Relief and Recon- 
struction. ' ' 

Wm. T. Scott, 
Superintendent . 



DIAMOND JUBILEE CELEBRATION 
THIS WEEK. 

Mrs. Judson E. Piebiger of Grin- 
nell, Iowa, a vice-president of The 
Board of Home Missions of the Con- 
gregational Christian Churches, flew 
to San Juan, Puerto Rico, Thursday, 
March 3, to represent there The 
Board of Home Missions at the cele- 
bration of the 50th Anniversary of 
Protestant Missions in Puerto Rico, 
March 6 to 13. 

Congregational Christian work in 
Puerto Rico, began in 1899 when they 
together with Presbyterians, Baptists, 
Methodists, Disciples, United Breth- 
ren, and Christians sent their mis- 
( Continued on page 6.) 



Established 1844 by Rev. Daniel W. Kerr. 

A Religious Weekly for the Home, daveted 
to the interests of the Kingdom as represent- 
ed by the Congregational Christian Churches. 
Our Principles. 

1. The Lord Jesus Christ is the only 
Head of the Church. 

2. Christian is a sufficient name for the 
Church, 

3. The Bible Is a sufficient rule of faith 
and practice. 

4. Christian character is a sufficient test 
of fellowship and Church membership. 

5. The right of private judgment and the 
liberty of conscience is a right and a privi- 
lege that should be accorded to and exer- 
cised by all. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor Robert Lee House 

Managing Editor John T. Kernodle 

Associate Editors — J. B. Allen, H. Q. Coun- 
cil Jr., J. H. Dollar, F. B. Eutsler, 8. C. 
Harrell, R. M. KhnbaJl, B. V. Munger, 
J. E. Neese, W. W. Sloan, H. S. Smith. 
Corresponding Editors — J. F. Apple (E. N. 
C.), W. M. Stevens (N. C. * Va.), F. C. 
Lester (W. N. CO, J. G. Truitt (E. Va.), 
R. A. Whitten (V. Va.). 
Departmental Editors — Wm. T. Scott, Con- 
vention ; Mrs. W. J. Andes, Women's 
Work; Miss Elizabeth Chicoine, Young 
People's Work; Mrs. R. L. House, Chil- 
dren; L. E. Smith, Christian Education; 
Clias. D. Johnston, Orphanage; H. S. 
Hardcastle, Sunday School. 
Board of Publications— W. J. Andes, S. E. 
Madren, W. M. Stevens, W. E. Wisseman, 
T. F. Wright. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Six Months $1.00 

One Year $2.00 



Published by the Board of Publications, 
agent for the Southern Convention of Con- 
gregational Christian Churches, and printed 
every Thursday except the last in June and 
December by the Central Publishing Co., 
Inc., Richmond, Va. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Post 
Office at Richmond, Va., July 25, 1922, un- 
der Act of March 3, 1879. 



Remittances for subscriptions should be sent 
to the Convention Office, Elon College, 
N. C. 

A li uther matters of business should be ad- 
dressed to The Christian Sun, 1536 East 
Broad Street, Richmond, 19, Va. 

Contributions should reach the editor at 
3206 Grove Avenue, Richmond, 21, Va 



The Christian Sun Subscription Blank 

FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 
FIFTY ISSUES FOR $2.00 

Dr. Wm. T. Scott 
Elon College, N. C. 

Enclosed find $ for which please send The Christian 

Sun for one year to 

Address 

Name 

L J New I J Renewal 



Page Four. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 10, 1949. 




THE EDITOR'S JVJXSSAGE, 




CORPORATE UNION 

The couple called the minister. Their marriage had 
not been going well and was headed for the rocks. The 
minister attempted to counsel with them, but found 
them feverishly preferring charges the one against the 
other. He finally called a halt to their acrimonious pro- 
ceedings, and declared that they must begin on a new 
and higher level. No solution would be found by meet- 
ing every minute charge with a counter charge. The 
central purpose of their marriage must take precedence 
over all details. They must forget the unpleasant 
details of the past and earnestly press forward toward 
the supreme goal of spiritual rather than mere technical 
union. 

Perhaps there is a lesson here, a very important les- 
son for church union. To much of the discussion of our 
E. & R. Merger has moved on the basis of technical 
details: Criticism of the Basis of Union, the percentage 
of voting churches, the validity of the Interpretations, 
skepticism of the writing of the constitution. Now some 
members of the opposition are urging that their case be 
placed in the hands of lawyers. 

Every minister knows that the possibility of saving 
a marriage diminishes when either party employs a 
lawyer. The party is more concerned with establishing 
his own rights than in maintaining union. Mutuality 
has been defeated. 

Moses, the greatest of all lawgivers, was never per- 
mitted to enter the Promised Land. With all due re- 
spect to the profession, does anyone expect lawyers to 
lead churchmen today into the Land of Promise ? Pro- 
longed debate, litigation, and needless delay may frus- 
trate the will and plan of God. Details must ever be 
subservient to the great central purposes of life. We 
must have unswerving faith in the compatibility of all 
God's children. There is a Tide in the affairs of men 
which, taken at its flood, leads on to corporate fortune. 
Woe unto those who miss the boat! 



EDITORIAL MUSING. 



Laymen have determinative positions in our 
churches which either block or buttress the influence 
of the ministers. Our churches cannot go forward until 
our laymen are prepared to advance. A pastor spoke 
these words to his people recently: "The layman's task 
is as sacred as the minister's. God calls men to Christian 
laymanship as definitely as he calls men to the ministry. 
Without the dedication of laymen whom God critically 
needs at this hour the work of the ministry would be 
ineffective. The laymen of this church can carry Christ 
where I could never go. You have relationships that are 
not available to me. You can bring about reforms in 
business and the professions that are beyond my reach. 




You can put skill, influences and resources at the dis- 
posal of the church which I do not possess." Any church 
will become a stronger unit in God's Kingdom whose 
laymen take this message seriously. 

Lamentations should be included in our Lenten 
reading. Jeremiah describes the calamities which had 
befallen Judah and Jerusalem. Every experience which 
might prompt sorrow or regret are put into the picture 
of woe. Singing has turned to sighing. These emotions 
are aroused by the fall of Jerusalem. There is confes- 
sion of guilt, exhortation to repentance, and prayer for 
mercy. We remember that Jesus wept over that City 
long after it had been restored. Is there any city (or 
congregation) over which Jesus does not or could not 
weep today? To what extent have our sins of com- 
mission and omission contributed to the world's sor- 
row? How dynamic and far-reaching have been our 
efforts to alleviate suffering and heal the broken hearts 
of our generation? We are tempted to magnify our 
own sorrows, cover ourselves with self-pity, and remain 
oblivious to the deeper tragedies around us which we 
might enter redemptively. Ponder anew these lines by 
Elizabeth Cheney: 

Whenever there is silence around me 

By day or by night — 

I am startled by a cry. 

It came down from the cross — 

The first time I heard it. 

I went out and searched — 

And found a Man in the throes of crucifixion, 

And I said, "I will take you down," 

And I tried to take the nails out of His feet. 

But He said, "Let Me be 

For I cannot be taken down 

Until every man, woman and every child 

Come together to take me down." 

And I said, "But I cannot hear You cry. 

What can I do?" 

And He said, "Go about the world — 
Tell everyone that you meet — 
There is a Man on the cross 
Waiting for them to take Him down." 

Race Relations Sunday may be observed in an in- 
nocuous way. Some ministers and churches let it pass. 
Some utter a few pious platitudes. Few use it creatively. 
One congregation cried out that it was "ruined" be- 
cause a Negro minister had been invited to speak in its 
pulpit, although the invitation was cancelled just before 
Race Relations Sunday. One wonders in just what way 
the church was "ruined" : in man's estimation or God's ? 
Methodist Churches in Texas make a tangible expres- 
sion of their Race Relations observance with an offering 
for their denomination's Negro school. One lone church 
mailed a check for $1,201.67 to the Samuel Houston 
College in Austin! Think what the churches of the 
Southern Convention could do for Franklinton with a 
similar observance! Dare we face it and try it? 



March 10, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Five. 



Protestants in Roman Catholic Mexico 



By Dr. Nelson Dreieb. 



Mexico is in a dynamic mood for 
change and development. This is 
true from practically every stand- 
point. The radical anti-clerical move- 
ment of a few years ago is spent. The 
Catholic Church is active on every 
front to gain its former position of 
control. 

Many liberal people had their eyes 
opened in the period of the revolu- 
tion. Thousands of them have de- 
parted the superstition of Romanism 
and are either free liberal spirits or 
are looking to the Protestant 
Churches for their spiritual direc- 
tion. Many Protestant Churches are 
full to capacity, a large number of the 
new adherents are people of influence 
and power in civic and governmental 
circles. 

Our record in the work of the 
American Board is very good. We 
are in a position that will make it pos- 
sible for us to wield an influence 
greatly in excess of our numbers. The 
high moral, spiritual and educational 
standards set by our early mission- 
aries has not been forgotten. 

From the days of Pastor Stevens, 
75 years ago, a graduate of Pa- 
cific School of Religion, who was mar- 
tyred at Auhaluco in the compound 
of our mission property by a mob in- 
cited by the priest of the Cathedral 
across the city square, to the present 
hour is a story of devotion and love 
given by missionaries and their 
friends in the homeland. 

Marguerita Wright, born of mis- 
sionary parents in Mexico, was our 
one man mission through the difficult 
days of revolution and recurrent re- 
cession. In recent years she has been 
joined by Larry and Connie Stanton 
and Malcolm and Lois Hayes who 
supplement her in evangelistic over- 
sight of the churches, in educational 
work, and in the growing program 
with youth. We have raised up nu- 
merous national leaders outstanding 
among whom are Elena Ortiz in re- 
ligious education and Arturo Villa- 
lobos in church music. 

We face the opportunities of the 
present hour with high hope and defi- 
nite determination that the strategic 
position in Mexico where currency is 
favorable to multiplying our gifts, 



and where the people are open to our 
not be neglected. 

We propose a five-year program all 
of which we hope can be encompassed 
within our Christian World Mission. 
It calls for the relocation of the Colon 
School in Guadalajara and a new 
physical property. A new church in 
Hermosillo thriving metropolis of the 
north. The training of national lead- 
ers both lay and professional to man 
the new opportunities. We are anxi- 
ous to help the people in Guadalajara 
to get the new church which they so 
much desire and which they are com- 
mitted to do everything within their 
power to achieve. We must provide 
clinical service in connection with so- 
cial work projects. The salaries of 
our teachers and ministers must be 
brought up to level of decency and 
respect, It is important that we enter 
new communities where whole congre- 
gations of 100 or more people are 
beckoning us and saying if you can- 
not help us soon we will be compelled 



to turn to the emotional sects for as- 
sistance in obtaining leadership and 
buildings to house worship and edu- 
cation. 

We must spend some money to re- 
habilitate the splendid buildings at 
Colegio el Pacifico in Mazatlan. We 
must provide a more adequate build- 
ing and property for Ramona Salazar 
in her impressive and history-making 
social service program. We must 
train many laymen to supplement the 
leadership of our missionaries and na- 
tional pastors in many preaching 
points calling for our help. 

Mexico in many ways is unique 
among our mission fields. It is near 
enough to us so that many can go and 
see the fruits of our mission. It has 
thousands of devoted friends in the 
conferences of the west and across the 
country who are determined that we 
will develop a strong work that will 
be well-nigh self-supporting by the 
end of the five-year program. 

An important phase of the Chris- 
tian World Mission is the response by 
our churches to the Great New Day 
in Mexico. 



From Peiping to Mindanao 

By Raymond Blarney.* 



*A statement by Mr. Dreier, Superinten- 
dent of Congregational Conference of Sou- 
thern California and the Southwest, at the 
Midwinter Meetings of the Missions Council 
at Cleveland, Ohio, February 8, 1949. 



When last I wrote, we were in 
Peiping-. What happened to Peip- 
ing, you already know. What the 
future holds for the devoted friends 
still there, I don't know, but I antici- 
pate no physical danger for them. 
When the consul's warning - came last 
November 9, like all the rest we stud- 
ied our problem. We reached the 
conclusion that under the Commu- 
nists, the evangelistic work I was 
doing had no great future. We packed 
to go home. Two days before the 
scheduled departure, Miss Alice Ca- 
ry's good letter came from the Amer- 
ican Board office in Boston — not ask- 
ing us to go to the Philippines but 
stating the case. It seemed to us a 
call. 

So here we are in our new home, up 
on a hill overlooking Lake Lanao, on 
the large island, Mindanao. Beyond 
the lake and all around us, lush vol- 
canic mountains rise. Mindanao is 
what you think it is, tropical, heavily 
decorated with coconut palms, lots of 
jungle, monkeys, parrots, crocodiles, 
and brown-skinned people. 

Most of Mindanao's people are 
"Christians," which usually means 
Roman Catholic of sorts, dressed in 
American-style clothes and speaking 
a, bewildering variety of languages 
that are rather pleasant to hear but 



also English to some degree. Their 
new nationalism is quite intense but 
they do look in the direction of the 
United States for leadership and they 
are very friendly. In Lanao Prov- 
ince, however, all around us, are the 
Moros or Maranaos. The Moros are 
an ominous-looking tribe, fiercely Mo- 
hammedan and pistol-packing but still 
friendly in their morose way. They 
have been slow to send their children 
to the public schools and such English 
as they have is very limited. Tomor- 
row, on their market day, they will 
swarm down into the town square to 
buv and sell. Then the roads will 
flash all the violent colors of the rain- 
bow from their native clothes or wrap- 
pings. There will be much betel-nut 
chewing; and spitting from mouths 
full of teeth blackened with a combi- 
nation of tobacco and iron. There is 
romance in this town. 

But that's not all. The large room 
in our house is used on Sundays as 
the church auditorium for a little 
group of Evangelical or Protestant 
Christians. It is part of what is now 
the United Evangelical Church of the 
Philippines and our new assignment 
(Continued on page 15.) 



*One of six missionaries who left North 
China. 



Page Six. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 10, 1949. 



CONTRIBUTIONS & 



5 



SUFFOLK LETTER. 

They were a small army of little 
boys. Just little fellows all dressed 
up in their best Sunday cothes. How 
nice they looked ! They filed into the 
reserved pews in the beautiful Whit- 
ley Auditorium at Elon. Quiet, stur- 
dy little men they were. Following 
them were larger boys, sober faced 
and just as manly. They formed a 
group of future American citizens. 
Following them were as many girls, 
little ones and larger ones. All of 
them well dressed, all of them sad. I 
could but breathe a prayer for both 
the boys and the girls. Uncle Char- 
ley was gone. He was their friend. 
More than that for many of them he 
was the only Daddy they had ever 
known. He loved them. They knew 
that, and they loved him, too. Kindly 
grown-ups showed them to their 
places, and they packed into their 
pews. 

There were wet eyes everywhere. 
Most of us had never witnessed such 
a scene. The hearts of all of us were 
touched. And well so, for they were 
wards of the Church. They were 
"Uncle Charley's" first and always, 
and now in a more realistic sense, 
they were ours. His quiet form lying 
in state up front silently reminded 
us of that trust. Could he have put it 
in words, his quiet, gentle voice would 
have been pleading for them. It had 
often. He spoke to church after 
church, conference after conference, 
right from the touch of their hands, 
and from the embrace of their arms. 
He told his story in subdued tones, 
but with an eagerness never surpassed 
on our church floor. The church hon- 
ored his words, for his were words 
backed up with deeds — a lifetime of 
loving deeds. 

More than that "Uncle Charley" 
had carried their cause into many 
fine business and professional offices. 
His gentle, sincere manner, and his 
big heart and good business sense gave 
him a hearing. They heard his story 
and opened their hearts. The Or- 
phanage prospered, and became a 
home for many lads and lassies. God 
heard his prayers. The farmlands 
grew larger, and the farm was im- 
proved. New buildings were added, 
new faith and interest were created. 
And every boy and girl who was re- 
ceived there was given a home. 

There was a very large congrega- 



tion at his funeral. But hundreds 
who knew him and loved him could 
not get there. A large family of his 
own sons and daughters and members 
of their own families were there. His 
love for them had not lessened be- 
cause of his absorbing interest in the 
little motherless and fatherless chil- 
dren. Church leaders, ministers, busi- 
ness and professional men, paid hom- 
age to his kindly heart, his great life, 
and his good success. V. R. Holt, 
president of the Orphanage Board of 
Trustees and his fellow members led 
the procession of honorary pall bear- 
ers. Their faces expressed the loss of 
a beloved friend and the realization 
of a large responsibility now resting 
more heavily on their shoulders. But 
they had been wisely selected, and will 
do their work well. 

Dr. L. E. Smith, president of Elon, 
had lost a college treasurer and a 
faithful member of the Board of Trus- 
tees; Dr. Jesse H. Dollar had lost a 
leader in his College Community 
Church. They conducted the serv- 
ices. The College Choir sang. The 
flowers were many and beautiful, and 
from many sources Under a beauti- 
ful noonday sky his body was laid 
to rest in the community cemetery on* 
a rounding hill overlooking many of 
the fields which he developed and 
near the place which he loved. 

John G. Truitt. 



CHRISTIAN ARCHITECT IN 
JAPAN. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth William 
Dowie, 1738 Bentley Avenue, West, 
Los Angeles, Calif., have been ap- 
pointed for a three-year term of ser- 
vice in Japan by the American Board. 
The Dowies hope to sail for Japan 
within the next fortnight. Mr. Dow- 
ie, who is an architect-engineer, will 
go out as adviser to the Reconstruc- 
tion Committee of the Council of Co- 
operation in Japan. This Council rep- 
resents the interdenominational and 
interracial United Church of Japan 
and is responsible for the rebuilding 
of churches, schools and missionary 
residences in Japan. 

Mr. Dowie, who is an experienced 
bridge engineer and designer, as well 
as an architect draftsman, served for 
twelve years in Formosa (1913-25) as 
a Presbyterian missionary from Can- 
continued on page 11.) 



PEN PORTRAITS OF THE DISCIPLES 
OF CHRIST. 
VI. NATHANIEL. 

By Samuel Lawrence Johnson, 
Pastor, Park Manor Church, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Nathaniel, son of (Bar) Tolmai, or 
as he is more often known, Bartholo- 
mew, when told by Philip that he had 
found the Messiah argued that the 
Messiah could hardly have come from 
so insignificant a place as Nazareth 
and Philip being unable to meet his 
objection merely said, "Come and 
see." 

Jesus described this man as one who 
valued the spiritual things of life and 
sought to become everything that a 
true "son of God" should be. He 
was candid, open minded and un- 
usually free from sin. He was truly 
a noble soul. 

It is of interest to note that he was 
a native of Cana, a little town near 
Capernaum, in which Jesus per- 
formed his first miracle and also 
where the nobleman found the Mas- 
ter when he came seeking him to heal 
his son. Scholars have been unable, 
however, to definitely place the loca- 
tion of the town. 

Nathaniel was one of the seven who 
had fished all night and caught noth- 
ing to whom the risen Christ ap- 
peared and said, "Cast the net on the 
right side of the boat and you will find 
some" (John 21 :6). 

The traditions concerning him are 
of little or no value although legend 
would have us believe that he preached 
the gospel in India and there died. 



DIAMOND JUBILEE. 
(Continued from page 3.) 

sionaries down to work cooperatively 
according to comity agreements which 
are still observed. The Congregation- 
alists, United Brethren and Christians 
merged in forming The United Evan- 
gelical Church of Puerto Rico. 

Specifically our denomination is 
responsible for 22 organized churches, 
44 rural chapels, the Ryder Memorial 
Hospital and the Yuquiyu Rural Life 
Community Center, a Christian co- 
operative community. 

During the joint festivities there 
will be a special dinner in honor of 
Dr. and Mrs. Charles I. Mohler who 
retire next June after 40 years of 
service in Puerto Rico, 
al representatives attending this 50th 
Anniversary of Protestant Missions in 
Puerto Rico are Dr. Fred L. Brown- 
lee, Miss Ruth A, Morton and Rev. 
D. P. Barrett. 



March 10, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Seven. 



News of Elon College 



By President L. E. Smith 



CHARLES DAVID JOHNSTON. 

On Sunday night, February 27, 
about 10 :00 o'clock, Mr. Johnston had 
retired. He rang for his daughter, 
Rebecca, who answered the ring. She 
saw that her father was in serious 
condition. He had suffered a heart 
attack. She did manage to get a phy- 
sician and Mr. Less Wagoner from 
the orphanage farm to her father's 
bedside before the end came. It was 
evident that the attack was fatal and 
that a most valuable life was coming 
to a close. 

The funeral was conducted from 
the College Chapel Wednesday morn- 
ing at 11 :00 o'clock by the writer, as- 
sisted by Dr. Jesse H. Dollar, pastor 
of the College Church. Music was 
furnished by the Music Department 
of the college. The Board of Trustees 
of the orphanage and of the college 
attended the service in a body. A 
large number of relatives and friends, 
many from a distance, attended the 
service. Floral designs were numer- 
ous and beautiful. It was the kind of 
service that Mr. Johnston would have 
appreciated. 

Mr. Johnston was a member of the 
Board of Trustees of the College and 
was treasurer of the college. Before 
coming to the orphanage as Superin- 
tendent he was Registrar of Deeds 
for Alamance County having served 
in that capacity for twelve years. He 
declined an additional nomination at 
the hands of his party to consider the 
call of the Board of Trustees of the 
Christian Orphanage and of his 
church to assume the important posi- 
tion as Superintendent of the orphan- 
age. 

At the time of Mr. Johnston's com- 
ing to the orphanage it was in hard 
straits financially and otherwise By 
strictest economy, sound business 
principles, and constant hard work, 
Mr. Johnston built the Orphanage in- 
to one of the finest institutions of its 
kind in this section. He loved his 
work. He loved little children. It 
was a joy to him to be a friend to the 
friendless and a helper to the depen- 
dent. In the very atmosphere of sim- 
plicity he grew great in spirit and in 
service. For thirty-three years he 
piloted our institution for unfortu- 
nate and dependent children. During 
his service he literally built this in- 



stitution into the hearts of the people 
of the church. Any reasonable appeal 
to his people for the orphanage al- 
ways met with a ready and a complete 
response. He did all his church asked 
him to do and did it well and has the 
thanks and the sincere appreciation of 
the people as a whole for a difficult 
job well done. 

Mr. Johnston was reared in the 
Christian Church joining the church 
at Long's Chapel with his parents. 
Later he transferred his membership 
to Haw River and then to Graham. 
From Graham he came to the Elon 
Community Church where he was a 
faithful, loyal, devout member of the 
church. He lived a consistent Chris- 
tian life and died in the faith. May 
the blessings of God be upon His chil- 
dren and families, friends, and the 
work that was dear to his heart. 

The college adjourned classes, in 
honor of and for the love that all had 
for Mr. Johnston, on Wednesday 
morning from 10:00 to 12:00 o'clock. 



EVANGELISM. 

As the physical life of our Lord 
ebbed out He said to His disciples, 
' ' Go ye into all the world and preach 
the Gosepl to every creature." That 
command should be written over the 
door of every church, emblazoned 
above every altar, and stamped indel- 
ibly on the hearts of every Christian 
man, woman and child. This com- 
mand expresses" the purpose of His 
coming and the consuming passion of 
His life. During the days of His 
flesh, He taught, persuaded, healed 
and brought back to life those who 
had died that all men, that the world 
might know that He was the Christ, 
the Son of God, the hope of the world, 
and the Savior of man When He 
could speak and teach no more He 
laid these responsibilities upon the 
hearts of those whom He had taught 
and commanded them to go the ends 
of the earth and speak in His stead 
that all men might experience the 
power of God that He had released in 
the world. 

The church today has one task — • 
that is to give Christ to the World. 
We may give Him by word of witness. 
We may be slow of speech but we can 
at least speak out of what we have ex- 
perienced. We may tell " What great 



things the Lord hath done for us." 
When we speak out of experience we 
speak with certainty. It is not a the- 
ory, speculation, or implication but 
positive knowledge. The man born 
blind said, "Whether He be the Christ 
or no, I know not, but this one thing 
I know that whereas I was blind I 
now see." There was no gain-saying 
about his seeing. It was an indisput- 
able fact. When a man has experi- 
enced Christ he has the boldness of 
the Spirit with which to tell his story. 

Then we may give Christ to the 
world by the witness of life. The 
power of a Christian life is irresist- 
ible. Its influence is beyond control. 
When Moses had spent a season with 
the Lord his face did shine with a 
whiteness that was revealing to all 
who saw him. When the disciples had 
been blessed with His fellowship all 
took knowledge of the fact that they 
had been with the Lord Peter was 
so filled with Christ and the power of 
His Spirit that his very shadow was 
full of healing for the sick and af- 
flicted. 

The church needed the power of 
God then, and it needs it today. Man 
is the only medium through which the 
power may come. But first of all man 
must be worthy. Are we who live to- 
day willing to pay the price that the 
Gospel of Christ may go to the ends of 
the earth and all men have the privi- 
leges of life in Him and for Him. 



APPORTIONMENT GIVING. 

The local church is an important 
and essential unit in our church or- 
ganizations. In fact, it is vital to all 
undertakings and without the local 
church there could be no overall or- 
ganizations. For this fact, the local 
church must add its support. No lo- 
cal church should be content to plan 
its program for the year without pro- 
viding for sufficient funds to carry on 
its own affairs. It also should provide 
for forward steps, new undertakings, 
and new obligations. At the same 
time the denomination has institu- 
tions. These institutions have been 
founded by the church and the church 
is obligated to provide a certain 
amount of support and this support 
must be forthcoming if these institu- 
tions are to fulfill their purposes and 
render the services that the church 
expects of them. When the local 
church lays its plans for the ensuing 
year the support of these institutions 
are, or should be, provided for. 

The Convention has indicated the 
extent of the support to be given the 
(Continued on page 14.) 



Page Eight. THE CHRISTIAN SUN March 10, 1949. 

Our Christian World Mission 

Rev. F. C. LESTER, Writer 



LEARN 

Life will be too short for most of 
us to learn all we would like to know 
about our mission fields. However, if 
we can master one or two ideas each 
week, there will come a time when we 
can think, and talk, with reasonable 
intelligence concerning our Church 
around the world. 

North China 

Our North China Mission started 
in 1854 in Shanghai, where Elijah 
Bridgeman years before had trans- 
lated the Scriptures into the Chinese. 
Today most of that area is Commu- 
nist territory. 

On the map that will appear very 
soon we can locate Tehsien, where our 
hospital and school have been utterly 
destroyed — by bandits, the officials 
say. Fenyang and Taiku were occu- 
pied last July, but Mary Dewar, 
Gladys Williams, Emma Noreen and 
Louise Meebold were at work in the 
hospitals and schools at (my) last re- 
port. The Oberlin Shansi School 
buildings in Taiku, vacated when the 
schools migrated west during the Jap- 
anese occupation, have been occupied 
by the Communists. 

Tsinian was occupied in early fall. 
The theological seminary is still there, 
but the Cheeloo medical school moved 
to Foochow last summer. 

In Tunghsien, Peiping, Tientsin, 
and Paoting, our other stations in 
North China, we have — or had — 12 
schools and two hospitals, programs 
of rural service, public health, and 
social service. What has, or will be- 
come of this, under Communist dom- 
ination only the future will tell. 

Shall We Leave China? 

This question is very personal to 
the missionaries, and to Board Secre- 
taries. It may be very difficult to stay 
during the next few, or several years. 
If we leave China in the time of great 
trouble, to whom shall these four 
hundred million people turn for aid? 



WORK 

What work can we do that will 
make it easier for our missionaries to 
build the Church wherever they are? 

The answer to that must be person- 
al, but it should be definite. It doesn't 
seem right for the missionaries to 
spent all of their energies while mem- 
bers of the churches in America con- 
serve theirs. 

Books and Boxes 

Suppose you were in China, Japan, 
or some other place where books were 
not abundant, and you received a fine 
book of poems, a stirring novel like 
The Big Fisherman, or even a beauti- 
ful copy of the Scriptures from a 
member of a church back home. How 
it would warm your heart ! And make 
you feel that you were not alone ! 

Angie Crew, and others, tell how 
much the old clothes sent from Amer- 
ica mean to the people who have so 
much less than we. The greatest 
worth is not the warmth that comes to 
the body of the wearer, but the assur- 
ance that people of the Church, peo- 
ple they have not seen, remember and 
care. 

It is not too much trouble to get 
together a few things to send to the 
missionaries at home and abroad. 
Just a bit of work does the trick. And 
it makes so much difference to those 
who give and those who receive. 

"One Great Hour" 

When the four great broadcasting 
companies of America get together 
for an hour's broadcast, something 
important is happening. When the 
various religious sects pool their tal- 
ents and time, we should take notice. 

That is what will happen at ten 
o'clock on the night of March 26, 1949. 
American is to be told the needs of 
the world, and what we can do about 
those needs. It will just be too bad 
if we church people go to sleep, or 
for other reasons do not hear the 
broadcast. 



PRAY 

Prayer will not save the world, some 
say. Neither will money, armies, or 
the atom bomb save the world. But 
the world will not be saved unless peo- 
ple pray. People who pray are the 
kind who make the world a better 
place. Prayer releases power that 
would not be available without the 
prayer. Hence, men ought always to 
pray, and to faint not. 

Our Prayer List 

Sunday — Chinese Christian Leaders. 
Bewildered Government officials who 
are anxious for China to be Christian, 
Ministers who lead churches, especially 
those in Communist areas, Teachers in 
colleges and universities and lower 
schools, Business and Professional 
people, Officials of local churches. Try- 
to think of their problems, and to 
pray as they do. 

Monday — Hospitals in North China 
They are needed, and should be Chris- 
tian in every sense. Pray that doctors 
and nurses and all workers may show 
the Christian spirit in all ways, and be 
able to witness to their faith by their 
words and work. 

Tuesday — Schools in China 

Pupils, parents, teachers, buildings, 
equipment — these are all important if 
China is to win the long struggle to 
intelligent, Christian living. 

Wednesday — N. China Missionaries. 
There were thirty-three. Most of them 
are still there, we think. They will 
need opportunity to work, protection 
of life and property, wisdom and 
grace beyond the ordinary. 

Thursday — Bible Societies in China. 
Communists close the Bible, but China 
needs an open Bible, known and read 
of all men. 

Friday — Missionaries We Know 

Rev. and Mrs. Earl Ballou, Miss Alice 
Murphy, Rev. and Mrs. Bobbins 
Strong, Rev. and Mrs. Malcolm White, 
Rev. and Mrs. James A. Hunter, and 
others. 

Saturday — Our Other North China 
Missionaries 

Among them are Rev. and Mrs. Alfred 
D. Heininger, Rev. and Mrs. Robert 
B. Whitaker, and Miss Ruth Van 
Kirk. 



OUR UNITED PRAYER 

Good Master, Thou who didst heal the sick and cleanse the leper, listen to the 
prayer of thy distressed people around the ■world. They are sick in body, mind and 
soul. Some are keenly aware of their illness, and many are unconscious of their deadly 
malady. Let not our blindness keep our hearts from making their intercession to God. 
Give wisdom and skill to doctors, nurses, ministers, teachers, and all who try to lift 
men out of their ignorance, hunger, homelessness, and sin. Have mercy on the multi- 
tudes being taught that mercy is not a virtue, and give them courage to be merciful. 
Keep us who read these little lines sensitive to world needs, and make us to know that 
we can help Thee to create a Christian world, perhaps in our time. Let us not fail 
Thee today, or any day. Amen. 



March 10, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Church Women at Work 

With Emphasis on Missions 

Mrs. W. J. Andes, Editor 
637 S. Sunset Drive, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



PROGRAM FOR APRIL. 

Our society program for April is 
planned for a time to get acquainted 
with our missionaries for special 
study. The program has been planned 
and worked by Miss Virginia Brink- 
ley, 310 Cedar Street, Suffolk, Va. 

For the worship center, use a globe 
of the world with a tall white candle, 
representing the Light of Christ, and 
placed high enough so that the light 
shines down upon the globe. Place 
six lower unlighted white candles 
around the globe, each representing 
the six missionaries (and their wives) 
for special study. These candles are 
to be lighted from the Christ candle 
as the women taking part in the serv- 
ice tell about each of the missionaries. 
An open Bible and white bowers will 
add to the effectiveness of the worship 
center. 

Call to Worship : 

To people plunged in shades of night ; 
Go messengers of peace and love, 
Like angels sent from fields above, 
Be thine to shed celestial light. 

Go to the hungry — food impart ; 
To paths of peace the wanderer guide ; 
And lead the thirsty, panting heart, 
Where streams of living waters glide. 

Thy love a rich reward shall find 
From him who sits enthroned on high ; 
" For they who turn the erring mind 
Shall shine like stars above the sky. 

Hymn: 0 Zion, Haste, Thy Mission 
Fulfilling. 

Leader : Long years ago when the 
world was still in darkness, God saw 
the great need of his people. Out of 
his pitying heart .of love, he gave a 
promise — one which involved the 
greatest sacrifice the world has ever 
known. And so nearly two thousand 
years ago God sent His Son to be the 
Lijrht of the World that we may not 
walk in paths of darkness but may 
have the light of life. To symbolize 
this Light of the World and to honor 
our Savior, let us light this tall cen- 
ter candle which represents the 
Light whose radiance still brightens 
the earth today and without which 
there would be darkness and despair 
across our lands. 

Unfortunately there are still areas 
in the world where this light has not 
reached, and so when Christ said, 
"Ye are the light of the world," he 



charged us with the carrying of this 
light to those in darkness. 

We have met here this evening to 
do honor especially to our six mis- 
sionaries who have been chosen for 
special study this year. In honor- 
ing these "Heralds of Christ" Ave 
shall be honoring, too, all people who 
have heard and obeyed the call of 
Christ : "Go ye into all the world. ' ' 
Let us now see how the.se mission- 
aries add brilliance to the Christ- 
candle by the work that they do. 
First Woman.- The Christ candle 
shines brighter in our world today 
because of the work done by the Rev. 
David M. Stowe among the people 
of North China. (Explains work of 
the S'towes.) 

Second Woman : The rays from the 
Christ candle reach farther across 
the lands when we light the candle 
representing Miss Dorothy Blatter, 
who preaches the 'Gospel of good 
books for children ' ' under the Amer- 
ican Board of Foreign Missions in 
Istanbul, Turkey. (Expains her 
work. ) 

Third Woman: This candle which I 
now set aflame represents the spread- 
ing of the gospel by the missionaries, 
Bev. and Mrs. Raymond B. Blakney, 
in Peiping, China. (Explains their 
work. ) 

Fourth Woman: Our next candle 
which I now light symbolizes the 
work of the Robert Grants who are 
at phesent career missionaries in Ja- 
pan, being the first new Protestant 
missionaries to arrive in Japan after 
the war. (Explains their work.) 

Fifth Woman: See how the flame 
from the candle which represents the 
work of our medical missionary to 
India, Miss Carolyn Weeber, streng- 
thens the other lights. In what bet- 
ter way can the story of Christ be 
carried to the far corners of the 
earth than through the healing of 
weak and diseased bodies? (Ex- 
plains her work. 

Stxth Woman : People like the Lee 
D. Bergsmans do their share in 
spreading the gospel throughout the 
world and thus help to keep the 
Light of Christ bright. The candle 
which we light now represents their 
work as missionaries in Johannes- 



Page Nine. 

burg, South Africa. (Explains her 
work. ) 

Leader: What a task these "Her- 
alds of Christ" have in helping to 
bring his Kingdom on earth. Many 
sacrifices have they made to keep 
the flame of the Light of Christ un- 
dimmed. We have a great responsi- 
bility in helping them ; they need our 
encouragement, our gift s, our 
Prayers. Paul said that mission- 
aries are persons who believe the 
world is wrong side up, that it needs 
to be turned the other side up, and 
that they are sent to help do it. It 
will be largely through their efforts 
as missionaries and with our help 
that world evangelism may finally be 
realized. 
Closing Prayer. 

(Note: The full program may be 
had from Miss Virginia Brinkley (ad- 
dress above), including the explana- 
tions of the work of the missionaries. 
Be sure to write to her if you want 
this program for April.) 



RADIO DOCUMENTARY ON ASIA 
MISSIONS. 

A series of five 15-minute documen- 
taries, "World Without End," is now 
being offered free to local councils of 
churches and radio stations by the 
Foreign Missions Conference of North 
America. The first two programs in- 
clude an on-the-spot documentary of 
the 37,000 -mile trip made by S. 
Franklin Mack, Chairman of the 
World Radio Committee, the Rev. Ev- 
erett C. Parker, director of Programs 
and Production, PRC, and Niklaus 
Hagmann, Chief Engineer of radio 
station WJZ, New York City. The 
voices, the songs, the dreams of the 
nationals served by the missionary en- 
terprise are recorded. 

The third program is the story of 
Sam Higginbottom, missionary in Al- 
lahabad, India. The fourth is a drama 
of Albert Schweitzer, famed medical 
missionary. The fifth, entitled "Each 
One Teach One, ' ' is an interview with 
Dr. Frank C. Laubach, promoter of a 
world literacy campaign, by S. Frank- 
lin Mack. 



The Children's Division of The 
Board of Christian Education met at 
the home of Dr. and Mrs. W. E. Wis- 
seman, Greensboro, N. C, March 3. 
Mrs. W. J. Andes is chairman of this 
important committee of The Board of 
Christian Education. Plans were 
made for aiding churches planning 
for Vacation Bible Schools during the 
summer. 



Page Ten. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 10, 1949. 



^Tzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzmz zz zzzzzzzzzzzzmzzzszzzzzz zzz^ 

1 



1 FOR THE CHILDREN | 

I Mrs. R. L. House, Editor 



Do you remember some stories last 
fall by Rev. Douglas A. Smith of 
England? Here is another one by 
him : 

THE VOLUNTEERS. 

By Douglas A. Smith. 

"One volunteer is worth ten 
pressed-men," declares an old prov- 
erb. Who will volunteer to serve Je- 
sus our King ? 

Years ago a coastal vessel was in 
difficulties after it had sprung a leak 
from below decks, and water began to 
pour in. The captain urged the men 
to get to the pumps, but even then 
the water gained on them. Could the 
hole be blocked? The ship's carpen- 
ter was called into service, and he did 
his utmost to close the hole. Heavy 
seas continued to pound the ship. At 
last the captain asked for a volunteer 
to go down into the hold, to try to 
plug the hole, by supporting the 
planking the carpenter had fixed. The 
first volunteer was the captain's 
young son, Tim. He went below. 
After heavy buffeting the ship at last 
made its Avay to quieter water. The 
captain hurried below to relieve his 
son from his post ; but it was unneces- 
sary. Tim needed no human aid, he 
had given his life to save the ship and 
his shipmates. It looked as though 
the straining planks had slipped, and 
Tim trying to fix something else into 
the hole had had his arm trapped, and 
so was unable to escape from the ris- 
ing water. He was drowned. 

Recently an English Royal Air 
Force padre, the Rev. Hubert Cecil 
Pugh, a former Congregational min- 
ister, was posthumously awarded the 
George Cross. "Mr. Pugh," said the 
citation, "chose certain death to pray 
with injured airmen who were 
trapped in the flooded hold of a sink- 
ing ship. He simply explained that 
he must be where his men were ; and 
through his comrades demurred in- 
sisted on being lowered into the dam- 
aged hold. It was three-quarters full 
of water with the deck awash and 
caving in. When he knelt down to 
pray the water reached his shoulders. 
Within a few minutes the ship 
plunged and sank. He had every op- 
portunity of saving his own life, but 
without regard to his own safety he 
gave his life for others. He c7io.se 
death to help others." 



Alfred Sadd was a missionary of 
the London Missionary Society, sta- 
tioned in the Pacific at the time of the 
attack on Pearl Harbor. When the 
Japanese invaded the islands many of 
the white people were evacuated. The 
young minister was urged to leave, 
too. But Alfred Sadd was not made 
of the stuff that runs away. He chose 
to stay to look after his fellow Chris- 
tians. Soon afterwards Japanese sol- 
diers landed on the island. Alfred 
Sadd and some companions were im- 
mediately arrested and taken to an- 
other island. The Japanese ordered 
a parade of the prisoners, before some 
officers, who sat behind a table. Be- 
tween the prisoners and the table a 
Union Jack flag had been laid on the 
ground. An officer commanded Alfred 
Sadd to march to him : this Mr. Sadd 
did, but he walked around the Union 
Jack. He was instructed to return 
and then walk directly to the table, 
which would have meant treading up- 
on his national flag. He walked for- 
ward, reached the flag, picked it up 
in his arms, kissed it, and handed it 
to the Japanese officer. Alfred Sadd 
and his friends were condemned to 
death. As the prisoners stood in a 
row, the young missionary broke the 
ranks, stepped forward and bade his 
fellow-countrymen have courage, and 
be steadfast. So he died, the first of 
the group to be killed. He was faith- 
ful unto death. 

Jesus our Lord was a Volunteer. He 
gave His life for His friends. He 
called Himself "the good Shepherd," 
one who lay down his life for the 
sheep. "The hireling," He said, 
"flees when the wolf comes." The 
hireling is a "pressed-man. " But 
the Volunteer is steadfast, faithful ; 
he gives "not counting the cost." As 
we are thankful for the lives of such 
men, and especially of Jesus, let us 
volunteer to serve Him, "The King of 
kings, the Lord of lords." 



SCHOOL AT HOME. 

By Mary Elizabeth Thompson. 

Issued by the National Kindergarten 
Association. 

"No school today," said John Bur- 
gess. "The roads are just a glare of 
ice, and look at that rain coming 
down ! " 

"Too bad," sighed Mrs. Burgess, as 



she thought of her little live-wire 
Jackie and her almost grown-up 
daughter Alice. They would quar- 
rel — Alice was so bossy, and Jackie 
resented being bossed. 

However, matters turned out much 
better than Mrs. Burgess had antici- 
pated. She had not realized how 
strong a hold the discipline of school 
had already taken on her small son. 

There was no kindergarten in the 
town where the Burgesses lived, and 
so Jackie had arrived at the age of six 
without having had the benefit of its 
helpful lessons in self-government and 
cooperation. In the beginning he had 
found first-grade requirements hard 
to understand, but as he had gradual- 
ly become somewhat adjusted, the 
school routine had fascinated him. 

S'o, this morning, while his sister 
did the breakfast dishes and helped 
prepare the dinner, Jackie, at her sug- 
gestion, quite willingly sat at a small 
table near her with his books and pen- 
cils. He forgot all about Alice being 
his sister ; she was now his teacher and 
must be treated with proper respect. 
Lessons went on quietly and seriously. 

The effect was just as pronounced 
on Alice. She didn't nag nor pass 
sarcastic remarks. 

Mrs. Burgess could not help smil- 
ing to herself when she hear their 
father ask Jackie to hand him a ruler 
and Jackie first asked permission of 
his "teacher" to do this, and Mr. 
Burgess, grasping the seriousness of 
the situation, politely asked to be ex- 
cused for having interrupted the les- 
son. 

Recess time came and Jackie en- 
joyed it just as much as he would 
have done had he really been at 
school. Alice and he were as playful 
and friendly as a couple of kittens. 

Mrs. Burgess made no comment, 
but she did considerable thinking. 
Such a morning of quiet harmony was 
indeed a refreshing change. She 
would remember to ask the teacher to 
tea soon. Anyone who could influ- 
ence noisy Jackie so quickly to be- 
come an obedient and diligent student 
deserved gratitude. ' ' Not only that, ' ' 
she thought to herself, "perhaps this 
teacher could give me some helpful 
suggestions regarding home disci- 
pline." 



A minister asked a little converted 
boy, "Does not the devil tell you that 
you are not a Christian?" "Yes, 
sometimes." "Well, what do you 
say ? " "I tell him, ' ' replied the boy, 
"whether I am a Christian or not is 
none of his business." — New Encyclo- 
pedia of Illustrations. 



March 10, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Eleven. 



Youth at Work in the Church 

Ann Truitt, Editor; Helen Jackson, C. B. Twiddy, Assoiates. 



A WORSHIP PROGRAM FOR LENT. 

By Fleta May Mopfitt, Personal 
Chairman, Southern Convention 
Youth Council. 

Call to Worship : 

Holy Spirit, Truth divine, 
Dawn upon this soul of mine; 
Word of God, and inward Light 
Wake my spirit, clear my sight. 

Hymn : ' ' Spirit of God, Descend Up- 
on My Heart." 

Scripture : Matthew 25 :14-29. 

Thought for Lent : May we be 
awakened to a desire for more gener- 
ous giving and sacrifice, not only of 
our material possessions, but of self. 

Give . . . 

Give as the free air and sunshine 
are given, 

Give as the waves when their chan- 
nels are riven, 

Lavishly, joyfully, utterly give! 

Not the waste drops from thy cup 

overflowing, 
Not some small part of thy gifts 

ever growing, 
Give as God gave thee who gave 

thee to live. 

Leader : The story is told of a young 
oak tree growing strong and bearing 
with great pride its crop of acorns, 
when one day it heard a bramble 
talking : 

"These forest trees are our great- 
est enemies. Look at the space they 
occupy and the amount of nourish- 
ment they take from the earth. Sure 
they give of their acorns and of their 
trunks for building materials all for 
nothing. For nothing, Charity ! 
That's what it is, and who wants 
charity. As for that, blackberries 
give but they prick in return. I 
don't believe in living just to give, 
and for nothing ! ' ' 

The oak tree listening began to 
think, "Why should I give of my 
acorns and shade and of myself? 
What do I get in return?" More 
and more these selfish thoughts took 
possession of the oak and slowly its 
sap turned to poison causing the 
tree to start drying up gradually. 
The seasons came and went, but the 
oak tree shrank into itself and with- 
ered. The wind whispered around 
the tree, "Give! give, or how shall 
you receive? Bless or there is no 
room for blessing!" But the tree 
only murmured to itself, "Why 
should I?" It was already rotten 
at the core. 



Closing Thought : 

I would give my life as a growing oak 
That reaches for star and sun, 
And give of itself with a good tree 
will 

Till its growing time is done. 

Closing* Prayer : Master of us all, 
may we seek not to be comforted, 
but to comfort ; not to be understood, 
but to understand; not to be loved, 
but to love. 

(pause . . .) 
Master, no offering costly and sweet 
May we, like Magdalene, lay at Thy 
sacrifice 

Dear Lord to Thee, Dear Lord to 
Thee. 

Amen. 



WINCHESTER YOUTH 
FELLOWSHIP. 

The Pilgrim Fellowship of the Win- 
chester church has been busy this win- 
ter. Our social hall of the new par- 
sonage has provided an ideal place for 
young people to meet and enjoy both 
religious and social gatherings. 

During the winter we have held our 
Sunday evening meetings here, and 
have been entertained at supper meet- 
ings by various groups of the church 
from time to time. Following the 
meal, which is enjoj r ed before a friend- 
ly, open fireplace, aglow with crack- 
ling flames, a helpful and inspiring 
worship service is conducted. There 
is usually time for visiting together 
and enjoying fellowship before the 
regular evening worship service of 
our church, which most of our young 
people attend. 

On January 30, beginning Youth 
Week, we sponsored at the evening 
church service, the new sound film, 
"Salt of the Earth." The president 
of our own Fellowship, Eugene Rus- 
sell, Jr., presided. Betty Trenary 
read the scriptures, and Ralph Pugh 
led the song service. The service was 
well attended and the picture proved 
one of the most inspiring we have 
shown. 

It was our plan to close Youth 
Week with a debate, but because of 
the necessary absence of two of our 
debaters on February 6, we postponed 
our program until February 13. Per- 
mission had been gotten from the reg- 
ular quarterly conference of our 
church, and the service was announced 
for 7:00 p. m. on February 13. The 
boys set up the tables and chairs. The 



girls set the tables and decorated them 
with candles and flowers. The Fel- 
lowship invited members and friends 
of the church for a supper meeting. 
We served apple sauce, pickles, coffee, 
ginger ale, potato salid, cookies and 
cake, and asked our friends to bring 
a sandwich. There was a veritable 
feast and nearly one hundred people 
accepted our invitations. 

The subject for debate, "Resolved, 
That the Sinner Makes More Sacri- 
fices Than the Saint, " Mr. C. D. Ben- 
nett, a Handley High School teacher, 
was moderator. Strange or perhaps 
by coincidence, the affirmative debat- 
ers were Freda Seldon, Betty Koon 
and Evelyn Allen, all girls ; while the 
negative side was presented by Ralph 
Pugh, Eupene Russell, Jr., and How- 
ard Carper, Jr., three boys. The 
judges were : Mrs. Edgar Nelson, 
Mrs. Robert Newman and Mr. J. C. 
Shanholtz. Their decision was in fa- 
vor of the affirmative but it must be 
said to the credit of the boys that they 
did a good job, to be arguing against 
their own convictions, since all these 
young people are fine dependable 
members of our Winchester Church. 

It was the concensus of opinion 
that our evening was well spent. Fol- 
lowing the worship service, there was 
the debate, in which our young people 
presented in a striking manner some 
heart-searching thoughts which every 
Christian should consider. The de- 
bate really presented a challenge for 
higher Christian living. 

We plan to continue with our sup- 
per services. Our attendance is in- 
creasing weekly. We try to present a 
worship program with a deeply spir- 
itual note. Perhaps there are other 
groups who would find our experience 
to be their own. Why not try it? 

Mrs. R. A. Wiiitten. 



ARCHITECT IN JAPAN. 
(Continued from page 6.) 
ada doing architectural work and 
teaching Formosan young men. Then 
for eight years he was an architectu- 
ral draftsman with Witmer and Wat- 
son in Los Angeles, Calif., followed 
by nine years as a bridge designer in 
the Division of Highways for the 
State of California. 

In 1942 he began service with the 
U. S. Navy as an officer whose duties 
involved the use of the Chinese and 
Japanese languages. In 1946 he re- 
sumed his work as bridge engineer 
with the California Division of High- 
ways which post he leaves to go to 
Japan for three years under the Con- 
gregational Christian Mission Board. 



Page Twelve. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Sunday School Lesson 

By Rev. H. S. Hardcastle, D. D. 



SPECIAL TRAINING FOR THE 
TWELVE. 

Lesson XII— March 20, 1949. 

Memory Selection : Every one who 
asks, receives, and he who seeks, 
finds, amd to him that knocks it will 
be opened. — Luke 11 :10. 

Lessoh: Mark 6:7-12, 30-44; Luke 
11:1-13. 

Devotional Reading : Matthew 10 : 
5-16. 

Learning How to Work. 
"And He called unto Him the 
twelve and began to send them forth 
by two and two, and gave them pow- 
er over unclean spirits. ..." The 
Master used a sound educational 
method in training His discpies — He 
taught them to do, by doing. He had 
undoubtedly given them again and 
again the theory of the thing, but He 
knew that theory without practice 
would never get results. He knew 
that the only and the best way to 
learn is to learn by doing. He knew, 
too, that they would make some mis- 
takes, they would not be able to do as 
He did, but. in doing they would al- 
ways be learning how to do better. 
This principle of learning to do by 
doing is the foundation of the labora- 
tory method in schools and colleges, 
of practice teaching in Teacher Train- 
ing Schools, of apprentice school prac- 
tices, and of many other kindred ac- 
tivities in modern educational and 
scientific institutions. It is basic to 
the religious life, too. One may learn 
something about prayer from reading 
about prayer, but one really learns to 
pray by praying. If he waits to pray 
until he knows how to pray he will 
never leani to pray. The same thing 
is true about any kind of Christian 
service. Tt is a mistake to refuse to 
try to do something for Christ and 
the Church until one thinks he is an 
expert in the matter. Do what you 
can the best you can and you will 
learn to do better and better. There 
are thousands of people who could 
win others to Christ if they would 
simply do the best they can do. One 
factor in the "Special Training of the 
Twelve" was the lessons in learning 
to do by doing. 

Learning to Wait and. to Relax. 
"And He said unto them, Come ye 
yourselves apart into a desert place 



and rest a while. ' ' The disciples had 
been out on their special mission and 
they came back to tell Jesus "all 
things, both what they had done, and 
what they had taught. ' ' By the way 
that would give them an opportunity 
to make helpful and constructive sug- 
gestions so that they could profit by 
their mistakes and do better next 
time. For while practice makes per- 
fect, bad practice makes perfectly 
bad. Jesus knew that life has its 
rhythms. Periods of work should be 
followed by periods of rest. Intake 
must follow outgo. If one gives one 
must make provision to receive. Ev- 
ery one needs to learn how to wait as 
well as how to work, and this is true 
of the Christian worker as well as of 
other workers. The bow must be un- 
bent if it is to keep its resiliency. A 
preacher needs to take a day off as 
well as the manual laborer. Chris- 
tian workers need times when they 
not only rest physically, but when 
they spend quiet time with Jesus. 
This is real re-creation, life is re- 
newed from within. We need to take 
time to be holy. 

Learning to Use What W e Have 
For the Master. 

There are many truths embedded in 
the story of the feeding of the five 
thousand as recorded in today's les- 
son, but in keeping with the general 
topic of the lesson, we should note the 
special training Jesus gave His dis- 
ciples in using what they had. A 
quick canvass of the situation re- 
vealed the fact that they apparently 
had only five barley loaves and two 
small fishes, and that for a great 
crowd of five thousand. But at Jesus' 
suggestion and insistence they 
brought that to Him, and lo, it was 
more than enough to meet the needs 
of the huge crowd, for everybody in- 
cluding the disciples had plenty to 
eat and there were twelve basketfulls 
left over. Ah, what great things Ave 
would do for the Master if we only 
had more money or more talent or 
more time, or more what have you. 
But Jesus would teach us to use what 
we have in His name and for His sake. 
If we do that miracles will happen 
sure enough. It is not what we have 
but what we use that really counts. 

Learning to Pray. 
"And it came to pass that as He 



March 10, 1949. 

was praying in a certain place, when 
He ceased, one of His disciples said 
unto Him, Lord teach us to pray, as 
John taught his disciples." Prayer 
in Jesus' life was evidently something 
vital. It was no mere formal repeti- 
tion of words, no mere saying of 
prayers, but praying. The disciples 
were tremendously impressed when 
Jesus prayed. And they asked Him, 
through a spokesman — was it "The 
Big Fisherman? — to teach them how 
to pray. 

In response the Master gave them 
a form or formula for prayer. It is 
what we call the Lord's Prayer, but 
might better be called the Model 
Prayer, for Jesus said "when ye 
pray" or "After this manner pray 
ye." He did not mean of course that 
when one prayed he had to use the 
same words or the same form. He 
was simply giving the framework in 
which prayer was to be set, the princi- 
ples and the spirit of true prayer. A 
recognition of God's Fatherhood and 
His dignity and holiness, a desire that 
the Father's kingdom be established 
and that His will be done on earth as 
in heaven, petition for daily needs, 
even physical needs, a sense of sin and 
of the need for forgiveness, a realiza- 
tion of our need for help, and the 
ascription of the glory for all this to 
the Father who alone could give the 
victory — this in essence is the Lord's 
Prayer or Model Prayer. Further- 
more Jesus emphasized the virtues of 
sincerity, brevity, simplicity, submis- 
sion in prayer. 

And in a thrilling climax He em- 
phasized the grounds of faith and 
hope in prayer — the Father's char- 
acter and wisdom. If a child asked 
for a piece of bread would a father 
give him a stone (even if he did not 
have a loaf of bread for him?) ; if he 
asked for a fish would he give him a 
serpent? if he asked for an egg, would 
he give him a scorpion? Well, said 
Jesus, apply that same rule of thumb 
to God's dealings with His children. 
If an earthly father knows how to 
give good gifts to his children, how 
much more will God in His wisdom 
and His goodness give good gifts to 
His children. Not always what they 
ask, not always what they want, not 
always what they think they need, 
but good gifts. His goodness and 
His wisdom sometimes must withhold 
as well as give. All of us need to 
learn "the patience of unanswered 

prayer. " 

t 



Judgment of people is often wiser 
than the wisest men. — Kosstith 



March 10, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Thirteen. 



Book Reviews 



Teach Us to Pray. Charles Francis 
Whiston. The Pilgrim Press. $2.50. 
Anyone who can teach us to pray 
more intelligently, more consistently 
and more fervently is a friend in- 
deed to whom we are immeasurably 
indebted. Dr. Whiston has done just 
this in Teach Us 



to Pray. The 
author deals at 
some lengths 
with the theo- 
logical founda- 
tions or presup- 
positions of 
prayer, rightly 
insisting that 
prayer must 




substance as well as emotional fervor. 
The great elements of Christian 
Prayer, together with time-honored 
techniques of cultivating the prayer 
life are clearly and convincingly set 
forth. This is a good book for any 
season, especially the Lenten season. 
It should prove to be equally helpful 
to both ministers and laymen. 

R. L. H. 

# # # 

The Cost of Discipleship. Dietrich 
Bonhoeffer. Macmillan. $2.50. 

Perhaps you have never heard of 
Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Neither had this 
reviewer until the book arrived. Now 
he seems to be one of the authentic 
Christian voices of our tragic era. His 
book is scholarly, but it goes beyond 
scholarship — to Discipleship ! 

Rheinhold Niebuhr describes Bon- 
hoeffer as "one of the truly creative 
spirits of our age." In Nazi Ger- 
many he carried his Christian loyal- 
ty to the actual point of taking up his 
cross and going to his own Golgotha. 
A teacher and preacher, he was ar- 
rested by the Gestapo and thrown into 
prison, and was executed at Flossen- 
burg just a few days before this con- 
centration camp was liberated by the 
Allies. 

By all means include this book in 
your Lenten reading, preaching — and 
discipline ! 

R. L. H. 

* # # 

What Churches Can Do About Eco- 
nomic Life — Programs and Re- 
sources. Cameron P. Hall. De- 
partment of the Church and Eco- 
nomic Life, The Federal Council of 
The Churches of Christ in America, 



297 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. 
Y. 30c per copy. 

This is a source book giving forth 
pages of answers to the ever-recurring 
question, ' ' What can we do about it ? " 

Stimulated both by increasing eco- 
nomic tensions and by the call for 
their Christian solution from the 
world assembly of churches at Am- 
sterdam, many church people are 
looking today for "a handle with 
which to take hold," in their own 
lives and communities. 

Many practical starting points are 
described in this pamphlet. They 
cover, among others, ways of study- 
ing and influencing the economic poli- 
cies and practices of the church it- 
self, conducting occupational get-ac- 
quainted programs, studying the great 
Biblical themes and passages which 
are guides to social action, arranging 
off-the-record gatherings of like-mind- 
ed or contrary-minded individuals, 
conducting "little Pittsburgh" con- 
ferences, and considering legislation 
on economic issues and relations. Un- 
der each heading are specific pro- 
posals which can be applied to adult 
men's and women's societies, to Bible 
classes, and to youth groups. This is 
an excellent guide to special activities 
during Lent. It is also valuable for 
year-round reference. 

A special boon to workers in this 
field is the twelve-page reference sec- 
tion, giving a seldom-assembled list 
of addresses of Protestant, Roman 
Catholic, Jewish, labor, business, 
farm, consumer government and oth- 
er agencies concerned with economic 
and social action ; names and ad- 
dresses of pertinent labor, business, 
farm, consumer and religious peri- 
odicals ; and a list of books that con- 
tribute thought to the many subjects 
covered. 

Christian Unity in the Making. 
The First Twenty-Five Years of 
The Federal Council of Churches of 
Christ in America— 1905-1930. By 
Charles S. MacFarland, General 
Secretary Emeritus. FC, NY. 375 
pages. 

Fascinated by the living and open- 
eyed style of this writer, I had read 
over a hundred pages almost at a 
breath. This monumental work, done 
by appointment of the Executive 
Committee, completes a group of 
books, in a lifetime three dozen, which 
deal with its substance and undergird 
it. 

In 1905 there convened at Carnegie 
Hall in New York the Interchurch 
Conference on Federation, among 



whose lay members were George 
Wharton Pepper, Justice David J. 
Brewer, Henry Wade Rogers, Robert 
E. Speer, John R. Mott and Wood- 
row Wilson then of Princeton. Twen- 
ty-nine denominations were represent- 
ed. Due to a motion in 1902' by Elias 
B. Sanford, "In the minds of such 
men as Dr. Sanford, Frank Mason 
North, Charles L. Thompson and their 
associates the Federal Council of the 
Churches of Christ in America was 
born at that moment, after years of 
pregnancy and patience." 

Then followed those years of lone- 
some toil and hardship and lack of 
funds which come at last to success 
through the deathless devotion of a 
few men of vision — of whom finally 
Charles S. McFarland came to be, by 
way of broadening secretarial ap- 
pointments, the spear point and sym- 
bol. 

"In 1911 there began the expand- 
ing circle of service. ' ' The Commis- 
sion on the Church and Social Serv- 
ice, Commission on Peace and Arbi- 
tration, in 1912 on Christian Educa- 
tion; 1913, Church and Country Life; 
1914, Relations with Japan ; White 
and Colored Races; 1917, General 
Committee on Army and Navy Chap- 
lains; General Wartime Commission 
of the Churches; 1918, France and 
Belgium ; 1919, Religious Bodies in 
Europe; 1920, Committee on Ecumen- 
ical Conference — resulting in Chris- 
tian Conference on Life and Work at 
Stockholm in 1925; 1923, Research 
and Education ; 1921, Goodwill Be- 
tween Jews and Christians ; Eastern 
Chs., Mercy and Relief, 1927, Young 
People and Children ; 1929, Churches 
Abroad, etc. 

The multifarious interests and pro- 
posals of the Council in all these 
realms must necessarily involve criti- 
cism. I have grown to be aware that 
every man is conditioned by the cur- 
rent of his approach. I have been up 
Mt. Washington by four trails and 
have seen photos from overhead, but 
I have never seen Mt. Washington, 
and the other day was shocked by a 
postcard of the Great Gulf — memory 
fades. As this book narrates the suc- 
cessive attitudes of the Council on, 
among other crises the League of Na- 
tions, every step seems inevitable, but 
there were divergent and no doubt 
equally inevitable views. The impor- 
tant thing is, that the Council did a 
great and unprecedented work, cover- 
ing the whole world, and blinking no 
interest in it. Such has been "Chris- 
tian Unity in the Making. ' ' 

B. Alfred Dumm, 
North Weare, N. H. 



Page Fourteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 10, 1949. 



(MajajaMaMME^'SEj'aMaiajajaiajajaiajaMaEEja 



SThe Orphanage | 
Chas. D. Johnston, Supt. g 
SMSiaMSja'SiMSiaMaMaMaiaMMSiajaiaaiSMS) 



Dear Friends: 

No longer will subscribers to The 
Christian ,Sun read the weekly let- 
ters of Charles D. Johnston, superin- 
tendent of the Elon Christian Or- 
phanage, for, as it does to all men, 
death has come to Mr. Johnston. 

With Mr. Johnston's passing, a 
Christian Gentleman has departed 
from our midst, and no finer words in 
tribute can be said. His death leaves 
a lonesome void, but, at the same time, 
shining above that void are the ideals 
that motivated his life — the ideals of 
the Christian Gentleman. 

Nowhere will Mr. Johnston's ab- 
sence be felt so keenly as among the 
children and the workers at and with 
the orphanage. 

A few weeks ago, when the Board 
of Trustees of the orphanage met, the 
members realized that Mr. Johnston 
had failed in health since the last 
meeting of the board. They saw that 
he was losing strength, and they were 
greatly distressed. The board mem- 
bers couldn't then, and can't now, 
picture the orphanage without his 
kind and gentle wisdom. 

The board extends its sympathy to 
Mr. Johnston's family and rejoices 
with its members in the wonderful 
heritage that he has given them and 
their children. Even in their sad- 
ness, they could not but be very proud 
of their father. 

Mr. Johnston came to the orphan- 
age over thirty-two years ago, an an- 
swer to prayer. In his capacity of su- 
perintendent he was loved by the chil- 
dren of the orphanage, by those who 
helped him with his task of caring 
for the children, by his Board of 
Trustees and by the Southern Con- 
vention. He loved his work of train- 
ing homeless boys and girls. And his 
results stand for themselves. 

The beautiful tribute paid to him 
by Dr. L. E. Smith at the funeral ser- 
vices touched a responsive chord in 
the hearts of all those present. But 
the evidence of the profound grief 
that was felt by Mr. Johnston's "chil- 
dren," those still in the orphanage 
and also those who had returned from 
their separate ways of life in the out- 
side world to pay a last loving call, 
showed what "The Man" had meant 
to hundreds of children who had lived 
with him and felt his guiding hand. 

The Board of Trustees is deeply 
aware of its responsibility in finding 



a successor to Mr. Johnston. Its 
members realize the difficult task of 
obtaining one who can provide that 
spiritual leadership that combines the 
personal touch with Christian ethics 
in training children, that combina- 
tion of Mr. Johnston had but which 
so often is translated into sterness and 
unapproachableness in lesser men. 

However, the board is fortunate in 
that it has the spirit of Mr. Johnston 
to guide it. It has the tangible results 
of his leading hand in front of it, and 
it has an awareness of the importance 
its decision will make to the future of 
the orphanage. 

Always there will be Mr. Johnston 's 
image to guide those whose decisions 
must necessarily affect the orphanage. 
And with that guiding spirit before 
them, the board members have faith 
that they will fulfill the duties vested 
in them. 

Iris L. Holt McEver, 
Member, Board of Trustees. 



REPORT FOR MARCH 10, 1949. 
Sunday School Monthly Offerings. 

Amount brought forward $1,392.59 

Eastern Va. Conference: 

Berea (Nans.) S. S $19.59 

Liberty Spring S. S 7.00 

Mt. Carmel S. S 13.90 

Portsmouth : Elm Avenue 

S. S 10.00 

— ■ 50.49 

N. C. & Va. Conference : 

Burlington S. S $ 77.13 

Greensboro, First 40.25 

Reidsville S. S 21.00 

Va. Valley Conference: 

New Hope S. S $ 8.68 

New Hope (Thanksgiving) 12.00 

20.68 



Total this week from churches $ 209.55 

Total this year from churches $1,602.14 

Special Offerings. 

Amount brought forward $2,335.22 

Mr. Whitaker, Tommy 

Wilkins $ 10.00 

Mr. Rumley, Jerry Wilkins 10.00 

Mrs. Black, children 20.00 

Chester H. Roth Co., Inc. . 7.50 

A Friend 5.00 

Mr. W. B. Truitt — memor- 
ial to Supt. Chas. D. 
Johnston 10.00 

Mr. Joseph B. Johnston — 
memorial to Supt. Chas. 
D. Johnston 5.00 

Mr. Chas. V. Sharpe — me- 
morial to Supt. Chas. D. 

Johnston 10.00 

77.50 

Total this year from 

Special Offerings $2,412.72 

Grand total for the week ... $ 287.05 

Grand total for the year . . . $4,014.86 



APPORTIONMENT GIVING. 
(Continued from page 7.) 
college by the church. The church is 
complying with the Convention 's 
wishes. Certain contributions are 
made week after week. They aren't 
very large but with a sufficient num- 
ber of them the college is assisted 
greatly in its current financial de- 
mands and is most grateful to the 
church and all sources of support. 
Previously reported $1,527.33 

N. C. & Va. Conference : 

Burlington S. S 61.68 

Greensboro, First 39.07 

Va. Valley Conference: 

Mt. Olivet (R) S. S 15.00 

New Hope 7.00 

Total $ 122.75 

Grand total $1,650.08 



MISSIONARY CAREER ENDS. 

Mrs. Helen Curtis Fowle, wife of 
Luther R. Fowle, for over 35 years 
a missionary of the American Board 
in Turkey, died Sunday, February 27, 
in the Booth Memorial Hospital, New 
York City, at the age of 62. 

Mrs. Fowle was born in North Ad- 
ams, Mass., and was a graduate of 
Wellesley College, Class of 1908. Aft- 
er teaching for a time in the U.S.A. 
she went out to Turkey in 1911 under 
the Congregational Woman's Board 
of Missions, now merged with the 
American Board, as a member of the 
faculty at their girls' school in Mar- 
sovan. A year later she married Lu- 
ther R. Fowle, lay missionary and 
business agent in Constantinople, now 
Istanbul, Turkey (1912). 

Mrs. Fowle leaves her husband, Lu- 
ther R. Fowle, treasurer and business 
agent of the American Board Near 
East Mission, and five children, all 
but one born in Turkey, namely, Cur- 
tis Fowle of Old Greenwich, Conn. ; 
W. Farnsworth Fowle, CBS World 
Correspondent, now in Paris; James 
Warren Fowle on a traveling fellow- 
ship abroad, now in Paris; Miss Hel- 
en Joy Fowle, 76 Irving Place, New 
York City; and Richardson Fowle, a 
student at Williams College. 

Mrs. Fowle also leaves a sister, Mrs. 
Edw. Lewis, Manchester-Green, Conn. 

Mrs. Fowle lived in Turkey under 
three regimes, the Ottoman Empire 
with Sultan Abdul Hamid ; the Young 
Turk Government, and the present 
Turkish Republic. With her husband 
she maintained a hospitable Ameri- 
can home overlooking the Bosphorus. 
She not only promoted the general 
work of the mission, but specialized in 
social work among girls including 
summer camps and playgrounds. 



March 10, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Fifteen. 



FROM PBIPING TO MINDANAO. 

(Continued from page 5.) 
is to work in the United Churches of 
Mindanao. It is a field of somewhat 
staggering proportions, considering 
the distances, the rough roads and the 
need. 

We arrived in Mindanao on Decem- 
ber 22, and spent Christmas with 
Dave and Margy Hamm and their 
young son, Robin (nine months). Dave 
has been here two years, assigned to 
work with the Maranaos and to build 
a church for all, not to mention nu- 
merous other projects, such as a print- 
ing press, library, dormitory for Mo- 
ro boys, etc. Dave is also pastor of 
the local church. He is a busy man. 

Thus far, I have been on two trips 
— one over to Misamis, where I spent 
two days with the ministers of the 
Northern Conference and on the oth- 
er trip to Cagayan for the Eastern 
Conference meeting. I could dwell at 
length on the hospitality of the Chris- 
tian friends. Suffice it to say that 
every town one visits wants the mis- 
sionary to live there. Nevertheless it 
is better for the missionary to live 
apart. It is much too easy for the 
new churches to depend on the 
"Amerikano" pastor. 

Our ministry here includes some 
fairly able men, many of them young 
and that is refreshing after China, 
where young Christian leaders were 
few. Unforunately, too any of them 
have had only the equivalent of a high 
school training and thus merely re- 
iterate, year after year, the faith once 
delivered to the saints in these parts. 
Silliman University in Dumaguete, 
on Negros Island, has a good Theo- 
logical School of which Jim McKin- 
ley, one of our American Board fam- 
ily, is dean. They are doing a grand 
and wholesale job of building an ed- 
ucated ministry but the supply is still 
far from meeting the demand. 

We have 172 churches in Minda- 
nao. They are spread around the 
north and south coasts of the island 
and are numerous enough so that they 
will have to be visited in groups. I 
was interested to learn how this all 
got started. When the Philippines 
won their war of liberation from 
Spain, the spirit of freedom was real- 
ly in the air. The people also wanted 
freedom from the Spanish Catholic 
Church which had been a chief instru- 
ment in their former oppression. At 
the strategic moment, some very able 
American Board missionaries arrived 
and people enough for many churches 
rushed to them. 
Educating and organizing these new 



Evangelicals was another matter. 
There were grave language difficulties 
at first. As ever, there were far too 
few trained workers to do the job 
and to this day that is still tragically 
true. For example, in Mindanao, 
which is wholly an American Board 
field, we have only three families at 
the moment to do what is required. 
(One family which I have not yet 
mentioned is that of Elton ("Bud") 
Brown, down at Davao in the south. 
His job is to rebuild the churches de- 
stroyed during the Japanese war. He 
has reconstruction funds to work 
with but never enough and day after 
day he drives his huge truck here and 
there with material and plans. He is 
young enough to take it and it is in- 
deed a job for a young man with a 
tough constitution.) 

When our people became Evan- 
gelicals, they already had a stock of 
ideas about Christianity, acquired un- 
der Rome's tuition. It included 
much superstition, vestiges of which 
may still be seen in the crude crosses, 
chalked or painted on the nipa huts 
in which they live. As American ed- 
ucation made its way into public 
schools, old superstitions gradually 
dropped from the more advanced peo- 
ple in the communities. 

In their place came the militant 
orthodoxy of the average American 
Protestant of the year 1900 — vigorous 
and colorful in its day — but now 
somewhat irrelevant, since times and 
needs have changed. It persists, I 
believe, because of the constant pres- 
sure of Roman Catholicism, the lack 



of contact with the world beyond the 
islands and the lack of schools com- 
parable, say, to those in China. As I 
see it now, education in our churches 
is the main job before us. 

There is so much that I should like 
to tell about the trip from Peiping 
here, but that can wait. We came out 
on a U. S. Navy LST to Chingtao and 
on a transport from there to Shang- 
hai. There was a hectic two weeks in 
that frantic city. At last we got our 
visa to the Philippines, which is des- 
perately anxious to keep out both Chi- 
nese TB and Chinese Communism. 
The best we could get was a tempo- 
rary visitor's visa, good for six months 
and renewable for six more months. 
At the end of that time, as in the 
U.S.A., the law requires that we leave 
the country and reapply for admis- 
sion. That may mean that we shall 
come home, perhaps in December of 
1949. But we hope to finish out our 
term here until 1951. Meanwhile, 
blessings on you all and much long- 
ing from us for the sight of you all 
once again. 

American Board Mission, 
Dansalan, Lanao, 
Philippines. 



' ' Yes, I saw considerable of John, ' ' 
said the member of the family who 
had been away among friends. "John 
is getting on in the world." There 
was a moment's pause, and then the 
gray-haired mother by the fireside 
asked , "Which world ? " — Sunday 
School Times. 



|l liiiniiiiiiiiiiiii in I iiiliiiiiiilliillllliillin Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillilliiiiiliii minimi minimum i n miiiimiiimin i i i imimnmi inimj 

1 

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Page Sixteen. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 10, 1949. 



PILGRIM PRESS 



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With a Foreword by Nels Ferre 

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The CHRISTIAN 

ORGAN OF THE SOUTHERN CONVENTION OF CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 
In Essentials, Unity — In Non-Essentials, Liberty — In All Things, Charity 

Volume CI. RICHMOND, VA., THURSDAY MARCH 17, 1949. Number 11. 



Ohio Girl Assumes International Post 

Miss Margaret Ruth Blemker of Bascom, Ohio, has been appointed an 
Associate Secretary of the American Board, with special responsibility for 
work in the Near East. Miss Blemker recently spent three years as a teacher 
in the American School for Girls, Izmir, Turkey, conducted by the American 

Board. "While it is true," she comments, 
"that Turkey is no longer the land of the 
Sultan, the veil, the Harem and the fez, 
there are still many old and picturesque 
features to delight the traveler. On the other 
hand nothing so much impresses the visitor 
to Turkey as the similarity in many respects 
with western life, and modernization which 
has come rapidly since the establishment of 
the Turkish Republic twenty-five years ago." 

The daughter of Rev. and Mrs. R. W. 
Blemker, Miss Blemker was born in a Re- 
formed Church manse and her father is now 
pastor of the Union Evangelical and Re- 
formed Church of Bascom, Ohio. She is a 
graduate of Heidelberg College and holds 
her Masters' Degree in Personnel from Syra- 
cuse University. 

MISS BLEMKER « A i . i 

Americans are warmly greeted on every 
hand in Turkey today," Miss Blemker says. "She is looking to us, not only 
for military aid, but also for moral support and example." 

Among the things which Miss Blemker highlighted as coming out of her 
recent experiences as a teacher in Turkey was "respect of the young for their 
elders" which modernization has not killed in Turkey; the expansion by the 
Turkish Government of its educational system, even into the interior; the 
development of community centers in every town and city where there is 
democratic participation in public affairs and the popularity of the study of 
English and of American schools. "Our American Board schools have more 
applicants than they can admit," she comments. 

During her summer vacations in Turkey, Miss Blemker was able to broad- 
en her knowledge of the Near East by visiting interior Turkey, Syria, Palestine 
and Egypt. On her way home to America in the summer of 1948 she traveled 
through Italy, Switzerland, Germany, France and England. 

Miss Blemker is now understudy for Miss Mabel E. Emerson who will be 
retiring this coming fall. As she views her new work she says, "It is a high 
privilege as well as a challenging responsibility, at this time when so many of 
the world's problems seem again in a crisis, to be permitted to work in a new 
capacity with the American Board. In this age when information of all sorts 
is penetrating the old world, it is reassuring to know American Board schools 
and hospitals, publications and service groups are on this frontier in Turkey." 




Page Two. 

0KSS3eS3S363^S36SS3S3SSSSS363SSSSS3S3S3S3eJ83K 
slews Flashes \ 

Dr W. E. Wisseman will assist Rev. 
W. J. Andes in revival services at the 
Winston-Salem Church, the week of 
March 28-April 1. 



Chaplain Ostrander of the Virginia 
State Penitentiary will address the 
Eastern Virginia Ministers' Associa- 
tion at the meeting on next Monday 
in Suffolk. 



Salem Chapel and Belews Creek 
Churches, near Winston-Salem, are 
planning for a new parsonage to lie 
built soon at Belews Creek Church. 
Rev. Allen Hurdle, a Duke Divinity 
School student, is pastor of these 
churches. 



Mrs, F. C. Lester and two children 
(Dorothy and Harry) are spending a 
few days with Mrs. Lester's parents 
in Florida. Dr. Lester returned to 
Asheboro in time for the Bible School 
Workers Institute on T h u r s d a y, 
March 3. 



Rev. Earl T. Farrell, pastor of the 
Haw River Church for the past sev- 
eral years, has resigned to accept a 
call from the Cypress Chapel-Damas- 
cus-Oak Grove Pastorate in the East- 
ern Virginia Conference. He will 
take up his new work June 1. 



Henry E. Fries of Winston-Salem 
was buried March 4. Mr. Fries was a 
friend of our church there ; his church 
— the Fries Memorial Moravian 
Church — having used our building for 
about two years while their building 
was in the process of being built. For 
seventy years he served as superinten- 
dent of the Sunday school of his 
church. 



Mrs. J. W. Whitt, a member of 
long standing of our High Point 
Church, is now living at 223 North 
Cherry Street, Winston-Salem. She 
had not had a copy of The Christian 
Sun for a long time and recently had 
the privilege of reading the last sev- 
eral copies. "How I have missed my 
church paper," she stated. Mrs. 
Whitt has been ill and in the hospital 
recently. Possibly some of her friends 
would like to subscribe to The Chris- 
tian Sun for her and thus she could 
receive a copy each week. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 17, 1949. 



WIDE-AWAKE LAYMAN AND WIFE 
CELEBRATE GOLDEN WED- 
DING ANNIVERSARY. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Pugh, de- 
lightfully entertained with a recep- 
tion in honor of their Uncle and Aunt, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Oates, of Winches- 
ter, Va., and High View, West Va., 
who were celebrating their Golden 
Wedding Anniversary. Mr. A. C. 
Oates is owner of the Oates Building 
Materials Yard, and has several farms 
and orchards at High View, West Va. 

They both have been ardent mem- 
bers of the Timber Ridge Congrega- 



tional Christian Church for over fifty 
years. They were among many to 
receive certificates by their pastor, the 
Rev. Roy D. Coulter, on the occasion 
of a Jubilee Service held at Timber 
Ridge last summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oates were recipients 
of many lovely gifts from their 
friends in Winchester, and from the 
members of Timber Ridge Congrega- 
tional Christian Church, who were in 
attendance at the reception. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Oates are among the out- 
standing and ever loyal supporters of 
Timber Rid^e Church. 



I 1 



3 




MR. AND MRS. OATES AND THEIR ANNIVERSARY CAKE 



WILLIAM RICH LICENSED AT 
PROVIDENCE. 

On Sunday night, February 27, at 
7:30 o'clock, in the Providence Me- 
morial Christian Church of Graham, 
N. C, Mr. William Rich, a member of 
the Providence Church, was licensed 
to the Gospel Ministry. 

Dr. Reynolds, pastor of the candi- 
date, delivered the sermon, using for 
his subject, "Pastors According to 
God's Heart," based on Jeremiah 3: 
15. Dr. Bowden, representing the 
Committee on the Ministry, made the 
address to the candidate. Dr. Scott, 
representing the Southern Conven- 
tion, made the address to the people 
and Rev. Kenneth Register, president 
of the North Carolina and Virginia 
Conference, made the declaration of 



licensure and gave the prayer of ded- 
ication. 

The church choir rendered special 
music for the service. 

This was a most impressive service 
and one which will have a lasting ef- 
fect upon the hearts of those who were 
there to share this service with us. 

Providence Church is to be congrat- 
ulated for the part it has played in 
producing a messenger of the gospel. 
May God grant that some of our oth- 
er churches may be led to do the same. 

Kenneth D. Register. 



The most devastating emotion in 
human life is hate, and the next most 
destructive and paralyzing is fear. — 
John D. Rockefeller, Jr. 



March 17, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Three. 



Southern Convention Office 



Rev. Wm. T. Scott, Superintendent 



DR. STANLEY U. NORTH VISITS 
THE SOUTHERN CONVENTION. 

Dr. Stanley U. North, Director of 
City Work Department of the Church 
Extension Division of The Board of 
Home Missions of Congregational 
Christian Churches, New York, ac- 
companied Superintendent Wm. T. 
Scott on a tour of the churches of the 
Southern Convention during the week 
of February 19-25. Beginning in 
Lynchburg, February 19, they stud- 
ied the developing work of our Lynch- 
burg Church. Dr. North was im- 
pressed with the opportunities await- 
ing us in Lynchburg. Extensive plans 
for developing the work are now un- 
der way under the leadership of Rev. 
J. B. Allan. 

Going from Lynchburg to Norfolk, 
Dr. North and Supt. Scott attended 
the Bay View service on Sunday 
night, February 20, meeting with the 
congregation following the service. 
About eighty people were present for 
the church service and conference. 
Rev. and Mrs. Johnson L. Griffin are 
beginning their work at Bay View 
with enthusiasm. The Sunday school 
is crowding the facilities of this 
church, and building plans must be 
completed shortly for the making 
available more facilities for the chil- 
dren and young people. 

On Monday, Dr. North addressed 
the Eastern Virginia Ministers' As- 
sociation at Suffolk and that after- 
noon met with the pastors of the Suf- 
folk area, visiting Bethlehem, Union 
(Southampton), "Windsor and Berea 
(Nansemond) . 

On Tuesday, the 22nd, they visited 
the churches of the Norfolk-Ports- 
mouth area, going to all nine of the 
churches, and in the afternoon met 
with the pastors of these churches at 
Bay View to discuss plans for aiding 
Mr. Griffin in his work at Bay View. 
Enthusiasm prevailed at this point 
over the prospects for the developing 
work at Bay View. Indications are 
strong that our Berea (Great Bridge) 
Church will soon be in the midst of 
an expanding city. Dr. North urges 
that we be prepared in these two 
points of the Norfolk area for devel- 
oping strong and vigorous work. He 
urged the ministers of the Norfolk 
and Suffolk areas to be vigilant for 
opportunities for church extension. 



Dr. North is of the opinion that new 
churches will start with vigor if pas- 
tors and laymen of local churches be- 
come interested in the matter of 
church extension in their respective 
areas. 

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 
were spent in North Carolina, includ- 
ing visits to Burlington where the 
Beverly Hills development was giv- 
en special consideration. Dr. North 
addressed the members of the Bur- 
lington (First Church) on Wednes- 
day evening, the 23rd, and on the fol- 
lowing day met with the pastor and 
others in making plans for the devel- 
opment of the Beverly Hills project. 
Our two churches in Greensboro — 
First and Palm Street — are both con- 
templating building, each of these' 
churches having on hand substantial 
building funds, and plans are now be- 
ing made for the beginning of con- 
struction at the earliest possible time. 

Dr. North's visit ended in Raleigh 
where he visited the Long-Meadow 
section in suburban Raleigh. Dr. 
North is of the opinion that a new 
church should be started in Raleigh as 
soon as it is possible. Raleigh needs 
another Congregational Christian 
Church if we adequately cover that 
city. 

We are profoundly indebted to Dr. 
North for his helpful visit to our area, 
and we sincerely hope he will be re- 
turning again soon. 



Money never starts an idea; it is 
the idea that starts the money. — Wm. 
J. Cameron. 



The Christian Sun 

Established 1844 by Rev. Daniel W. Kerr. 

A Religious Weekly for the Home, devoted 
'to the interests of the Kingdom as represent- 
ed by the Congregational Christian Churches. 
Our Principles. 

1 . The Lord Jesus Christ is the only 
Head of the Church. 

2. Christian is a sufficient name for the 
Church. 

3. The Bible is a sufficient rule of faith 
and practice. 

4. Christian character is a sufficient test 
of fellowship and Church membership. 

5. The right of private judgment and the 
liberty of conscience is a right and a privi- 
lege that should be accorded to and exer- 
cised by all. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor Robert Lee House 

Managing Editor John T. Kernodle 

Associate Editors — J. B. Allen, H. Q. Coun- 
cil! Jr., J. H. Dollar, F. B. Eutsler, S. C. 
Ilarrell, E. M. Kimball, B. V. Munger, 
,1. E. Neese, W. W. Sloan, H. S. Smith. 
Corresponding Editors — J. F. Apple (E. N. 
C), W. M. Stevens (N. C. & Va.), F. C. 
Lester (W. N. C), J. G. Truitt (E. Va.), 
B. A. Whitten (V. Va.). 
Departmental Editors — Wm. T. Seott, Con- 
vention; Mrs. W. J. Andes, Women's 
Work; Miss Elizabeth Chicoine, Young 
People's Work; Mrs. R. L. House, Chil- 
dren; L. E. Smith, Christian Education; 
Clias. D. Johnston, Orphanage; H. S. 
Hardcastle, Sunday School. 
Board of Publications — W. J. Andes, S. E. 
Madren, W. M. Stevens, W. E. Wisseman, 
T. F. Wright. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

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Published by the Board of Publications, 
agent for the Southern Convention of Con- 
gregational Christian Churches, and printed 
every Thursday except the last in June and 
December by the Central Publishing Co., 
Inc., Richmond, Va. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Post 
Office at Richmond, Va., July 25, 1922, un- 
der Act of March 3, 1879. 



Remittances for subscriptions should be sent 
to the Convention Office, Elon College, 
N. C. 

AH other matters of business should be ad- 
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Contributions should reach the editor at 
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Page Four. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



March 17, 1949. 



THE EDITOR'S j^ESSAGE 




MEMORIALS. 

One way for the church to enrich its life and per- 
petuate its influence is to solicit and erect appropriate 
memorials. The church becomes thereby the lengthened 
shadow of many people. New churches, church fix- 
tures, improvements and a variety of items may be 
secured as memorials. Examples, old and new, abound. 

The Rev. George Edwin Stickney was for ten years 
Director of Christian Education in Minnesota and has 
recently become Superintendent of the Montana State 
Conference. His father was a pioneer in Northern 
Minnesota and North Dakota in establishing Sunday 
Schools and churches. A beautiful memorial window in 
Plymouth Church, Fargo, N. D., was placed there by 
the family and friends, in memory of Dr. and Mrs. 
Stickney. 

Mr. Guy Elken was a beloved deacon in the Congre- 
gational Church at Mayville, N. D. He served on the 
board of directors of the State Conference. In memory 
of Mrs. Elken, a life-long member of the church, the 
members of the family contributed $15,000 to the repair 
fund of the church with the suggestion that the money 
be used to purchase new carpeting. 

The 1948 treasurer's report of the Euclid Avenue 
Church, Cleveland, lists thirty-five memorials received 
since 1912. The treasurer of the North Dakota Con- 
ference reports a number of memorial gifts for the Pil- 
grim Park Fund. 

There are always needs in the home church, in con- 
ference, convention and missionary enterprises. And 
there is no better way to commemorate one's loved ones 
than by making possible the satisfying of such needs by 
memorial gifts. It is gratifying to note the continuing 
stream of Life Memberships and Memorials registered 
by the Women of our Convention. These "living me- 
morials" give needed vitality to the work of the King- 
dom in our day. Do not neglect these opportunities in 
your church. 



THE EDITOR MUSES. 



Janitors serve an indispensable if not an honored 
place in the life of the churches. How greatly we are 
indebted to these ecclesiastical servants! Their name is 
legion. Many of them are remarkably versatile, serving 
as sexton and general factotum. It is the custom of 
some churches to remember their janitors on their birth- 
days with testimonials and gifts. The lowliest office in 
the church may be degnified by faithful service. News- 
papers carried the account of Stanton Carr, popular 
janitor of University Methodist Church in Los Angeles. 
Skilled in every trade, he kept the huge campus church 
in shipshape. "He was," said the pastor, "the most pop- 
ular man in the church." 




The deaf are entitled to the gospel, but little prepara- 
tion is made for them in the majority of churches. 
Some churches are equipped with hearing aids. The 
Second Baptist Church in Richmond is providing a 
Sunday afternoon service each month for the deaf. Sign 
language is used to translate the sermon. A film is pre- 
sented. This church is rendering a distinct spiritual 
service. The deaf have the gospel preached to them. 

Christ Methodist Church in Baltimore made the 
headlines recently. It has served unhearing worshippers 
since 1896. The workings of the service are described as 
novel, yet quite simple. As the Rev. J. Lee Williams 
preaches the sermon, his assistant, the Rev. Louis W. 
Foxwell stands beside him and conveys the message to 
the congregation by means of sign language. The Rev. 
Mr. Foxwell, better known as "the signer," has complete 
hearing, but he has used the sign language since child- 
hood because his parents are deaf. The signer speaks 
with his face as well as his hands. His expressions 
change, his lips move sometimes — while his hands busi- 
ly translate the words into symbols. 

Some of the gestures are obvious, even to those un- 
familiar with sign language. Others are more difficult, 
but are soon learned, and prove quite logical. For ex- 
ample, the word "Jesus" is formed by pointing with the 
left hand to the right palm to indicate the scar wound 
from the Cross. 

The Reformed Church has an honorable and inter- 
esting history. Its origin reaches back into the continent 
of Europe. It is one of the two movements which de- 
veloped out of the Protestant Reformation in the begin- 
ning of the Sixteenth Century. So many abuses had 
crept into the Roman Church that the need of a drastic 
reform began to be felt by many spiritual leaders. The 
Papal System came under wide criticism. Ulrich Zwin- 
gli, Martin Luther and others began to preach a more 
evangelical Gospel. At first all the participants in this 
effort to reform the Church were called "Reformers." 
Ultimately the followers of Luther became known as 
Lutherans, while the followers of Zwingli retained the 
name Reformers. The principles of the great Reforma- 
tion soon crystallizer into the well-defined propositions: 
Justification by grace through faith, which was doctrinal 
statement, indicating the way of salvation; the Bible as 
the only rule of faith, which was a practical statement 
indicating the way of life; and the universal priesthood 
of believers, an ecclesiastical reform under the banner of 
religious freedom. It is heartening to know that the 
E. & R. Merger will put us back into the main stream of 
the Protestant Reformation and give us a more substan- 
tial historical background. 



How little do they see what is, who frame their 
hasty judgments upon that which seems. — Southey. 



March 17, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Five. 



Concerning the Arrested Protestant 
Leaders in Bulgaria 

A Statement by the American Board* 



The democratic world will be 
shocked and stabbed awake when they 
learn and fully understand what lies 
back of the recent arrest and convic- 
tion of fifteen leaders of the Protes- 
tant churches in Bulgaria. A storm 
of officially inspired persecution has 
fallen upon these Christian leaders 
and their churches. The Bulgarian 
Government seems to be carrying out 
the policy of denying freedom of re- 
ligion and of ruthlessly suppressing 
all religious groups which are not com- 
pletely subservient to the State. 

Spiritual Kin. 
Protestants around the world will 
wish to assure these Bulgarian lead- 
ers and their terrorized congregations 
of a sense of spiritual solidarity in a 
common fellowship and the common 
cause of evangelical Christianity. 
They are our spiritual kin. We can- 
not reach them except by means of 
prayer, but all the world should know 
not only what is happening to them 
but of the undying concern which 
evangelical Christians around the 
world have for them and for all the 
oppressed people of Bulgaria. 

Attempting to Break Christian Ties. 

Many of the evangelical leaders 
were arrested in 1948. Some of them 
are among the fifteen pastors who 
have just been tried. They were ac- 
cused on three counts : espionage for 
the United States, treason and black- 
market dealings. Although individ- 
ual leaders conceivably may have 
overstepped some present Bulgarian 
law, the basic reason for the persecu- 
tion of these Protestant pastors is that 
they strove to place loyalty to God 
above earthly commands. At the mo- 
ment, the Bulgarian Government is 
considering a law outlawing all mis- 
sion work in Bulgaria, prohibiting all 
connection between evangelical Bul- 
garian churches and churches outside 
the country, and providing for the 
confiscation of mission property. 



*Editorial Note : The eyes and ears of 
the Christian World have followed the trail 
and conviction of 15 Protestant pastors in 
Bulgaria, four of whom were sentenced for 
life. One was a Congregationalist. The 
sentences were declared a "travesty on jus- 
tice" by Bishop Paul Garber of Geneva. 
Many of our -readers will welcome this 
timely article which gives the interseting 
background of Congregational efforts in 
Bulgaria. 



American Board Started Evangelical 
Movement in Bulgaria Nearly 
One Hundred Years Ago. 

In 1857 when most of the Balkan 
Peninsula, including present-day Bul- 
garia, was part of the Ottoman Em- 
pire, Cyrus Hamlin of the American 
Board went from Istanbul to make a 
survey of this region known then as 
European Turkey. He found there 
people of various religious back- 
grounds. He was particularly im- 
pressed by the Bulgarians, who 
though poor and almost completely 
illiterate were ambitious, liberty lov- 
ing, thrifty and eager to learn. Mis- 
sion work was opened in 1858 and 
within a few years several centers 
were opened for boys and girls and 
literature in the Bulgarian language 
was prepared and distributed. Pur- 
pose : to make better Christians and 
good citizens. 

The missionaries have constantly 
held to their purpose to serve the 
highest interests of the Bulgarian peo- 
ple. They have refrained from parti- 
san politics. They imposed no relig- 
ious tests for admission to their 
schools. Their primary purpose was 
to encourage in their students a per- 
sonal and living faith in Christ and to 
prepare them to go out as sound- 
thinking, conscientious, industrious 
and self-reliant citizens of Bulgaria. 
In 1878 the Marquis of Bath paid 
high tribute to the missionaries along 
these very lines commenting also on 
their relief work for the needy and op- 
pressed, and saying : ' ' There is hard- 
ly a town in Bulgaria where persons 
are not to be found who owe to them 
the advantages of a superior educa- 
tion. The result of their teaching has 
permeated all Bulgarian society, and 
is not the least important of the causes 
that have rendered the people capable 
of wisely using the freedom so sud- 
denly conferred on them." Since 
1933, the thirty-six congregations of 
the Protestant churrhes in Bulgaria, 
which resulted from the work of the 
American Board missionaries, have 
become self-governing and self-sup- 
porting. No subsiding have been 
granted them and no funds sent ex- 
cept for general humanitarian relief. 
Their pastors and lay leaders have 
been men and women of sturdy char- 
acter and devoted Christian service, 
shepherds of simple, Bible-loving con- 



gregations made up of humble people 
of meager means living mostly in 
small towns or villages. The kinder- 
garten movement started by Elizabeth 
Clarke became a foundation stone in 
the whole State educational system. 
The Polk School at Pordim, where 
young men and women were, trained 
in modern methods of agriculture, 
animal husbandry and housewifery 
was founded by Dr. and Mrs. Edward 
B. Haskell. Concern for people of 
the crowded city of Sophia led to the 
opening of a community center in the 
heart of the industrial section of that 
city. 

First Weekly Newspaper — First 
Bible in Bulgarian. 

In 1871 the town of Samokov was 
made the center of the Mission's edu- 
cational work. Courses were opened 
to train leaders for the evangelical 
church. On June 30, 1871, the first 
number of the weekly evangelical 
newspaper, Zomitsa was published. 
It was the first continuously appear- 
ing paper in the Bulgarian language 
and survived all difficulties until sup- 
pressed in October, 1948. The dis- 
tinguished missionary linguist, Dr. 
Elias Riggs, helped establish this pa- 
per and brought with him from Istan- 
bul the first translation of the Bible 
into the Bulgarian language. Also in 
1871 the first Evangelical Church So- 
ciety was organized in the rural town 
of Bansko. Four years later the Bul- 
garian Evangelical Society was or- 
ganized. 

Missionaries Stood By. 

The Bulgarian evangelical Chris- 
tians and the whole nation to this day 
revere such missionary names as Has- 
gell, House, Thomson, Clarke, Riggs, 
Washburn, Long, Challis, Davis, Os- 
trander, Baird and Count. They were 
cherished as devoted friends of the na- 
tion completely free from political in- 
terests or connections. After the first 
World War, the Samokov schools 
moved to Sofia, and became the 
"American College" with a separate 
Board of Trustees, part of the Near 
East College Association. It was 
closed in 1942 by Nazi influence. 

In view of all these facts, it is im- 
possible not to interpret the policy of 
the present Bulgarian Government as 
ruthless suppression of religious 
groups which are not wholly subserv- 
ient to the State. 



Tuchiness, when it becomes chronic, 
is a morbid condition of the inward 
disposition. It is a self-love inflamed 
to the acute point. — Drummond. 



Page six. THE CHRISTIAN SUN 

CONTRIBUTIONS 



SUFFOLK LETTER. 

All of a minister's pay does not 
come in the salary check. Some of it 
comes to him when he sees several fine 
young couples come into the worship 
services Sunday morning after Sun- 
day morning. They are among the 
thinking and choosing people of the 
community. To know that they have 
thought and chosen to make the habit 
of church attendance a part of their 
regular program is something to make 
any minister feel good. I know sev- 
eral couples like that, Some of them 
have to make plans ahead to be able to 
attend the Sunday morning church 
service, but it is plenty good pay to 
the minister to see that they have 
chosen to make whatever plans neces- 
sary and that they are right there. 

There is a couple — and may their 
kind increase — who walk right down 
near the front with, their two little 
children, and take their place Sunday 
after Sunday. Some more of the 
pastor's pay is in seeing little children 
come into the regular morning church 
service with their parents. The min- 
ister knows that while the little child 
may not sit up still and quiet every 
minute of the time nevertheless he 
will be taking in most of what is going 
on. And more than that he knows 
that the family which comes to church 
with the little children right along 
with them will be parents who are 
later proud of their sons and daugh- 
ters. It is good pay to see parents and 
children worship at the big morning 
service right along together in a fam- 
ily pew. 

There is a bit more good pay — pay 
that does not show up in the salary 
check — but something that makes the 
minister quite as glad is to see some 
dear, faithful member who has been 
sick for a long time, who has been 
greatly missed by him in their pew, 
back in place again. I saw that last 
Sunday morning! It made me very 
happy. I couldn't buy raiment with 
that sort of pay, but I could preach 
much better, pray much better and 
be a better pastor. And how bappy 
that whole family was ! 'Twas mighty 
pay. 

Yes, and how about being down 
town where the streets are crowded 
and the crowd is moving swiftly on 
its way, and some shrill childish voice 
cheerily sounds out about the pound- 
ing tread of many feet, "Hi! there, 



Dr. Brown! Mother, that was Dr. 
Brown ! ' ' No, the preacher will not 
need to pay any income tax on that, 
but I am here to tell you it is plenty 
good pay. It says to you that there 
is a. child that knows you and honors 
you, and loves you. It says there is 
a child that represents a home where 
the church is honored and the chil- 
dren are told about the preacher as 
though he were a dear friend. The 
little voice opens the window to the 
heart of the most sacred precincts of 
the home, and you walked faster and 
happier because you know there is a 
home that will call you when they 
need you and let you be of some serv* 
ice to them. That's good pay. That 
is the kind of pay that makes good 
preachers, good communities, and 
good going - for really great and worth- 
while futures. 

John G. Truitt. 



LETTER FROM REV. D. P. BARRETT. 

My Dear Bro. Scott : 

Your much appreciated letter came 
to me in San Juan the day after my 
arrival. Thanks so much for your 
kindness in all you have done in union 
with many others of the Southern 
Convention to make my visit to Puerto 
Rico a real joy and comfort, 

We had a wonderful trip and a 
hearty reception to the Island and 
friends without number greet us near- 
ly on every step along the streets of 
Ponce. 

Arrived here from San Juan last 
Saturday where I have been ever 
since. 

Attended three services last Sun- 
day and a dedicatory service of a new 
church building Tuesday evening of 
this week. 

We shall leave Ponce this afternoon 
for San Juan where we shall expect 
to attend the great meeting of the 
fiftieth anniversary of Evangelical 
work in Puerto Rico. 

A reunion of all denominations 
working in the Island will be a splen- 
did proof of the progress in Evangeli- 
cal work during these years of half a 
century. It is believed that 5,000 
will be present. Will let yon know 
more about my observations within a 
few days. 

Until then I remain yours most 
cordially, 

D. P. Barrett. 



March 17, 1949. 

LETTER FROM THE JACKSONS. 

Shaowu, Fukien, China, 
January 20, 1949. 

Dear Family and Friends : 

When unanswered letters are mixed 
with Christmas notes from 1947 and 
when many of those very letters are 
from busy people whose living condi- 
tions are more rugged than ours, then 
it is time for drastic action. And so 
once more I take to the mimeograph 
machine. While it is busy grinding 
out Chinese examination papers for 
an Mei School, I '11 get busy with put- 
ting my thoughts to all of you good 
folk on paper. 

First, a word of thanks for snap- 
shots — only you who are also far from 
friends and family can know how 
much they mean to us. And then, 
thanks for writing us, especially for 
details of your lives and work. 

Second, a word about the Commit' 
nist - Nationalist war. Last month 
when the Voice of America radio 
newscast announced that China was 
engaged in the biggest battle of her 
long history, we were preparing for 
our Synod Annual Meeting. As Avin- 
ter set in, we were enjoying our first 
electric lights from our own generator 
and the comfort, unusual here, of our 
wood stove. So peaceful was Shaowu 
that even the inflation seemed to have 
reached a lull. One of the pastors 
upon his return from a meeting in 
Shanghai said, "Shaowu is heaven; 
even my dog here fares better than I 
did in Shanghai." But the Shaowu 
people know their country is engaged 
in a terrible civil war. Every morn- 
ing enroute to school a certain drug- 
gist asks me, "What news?" Who- 
ever happens by at that moment stops 
in his tracks — the coolie carrying 
wood, the wounded soldier looking for 
a bargain, the clerk hurrying past the 
peddlers. All stop, not to stare at 
the foreigner, but to hear what the 
American radio says about the war'. 

The early January lull on the front, 
due to weather or peace-feelers, or 
both, now seems to have broken. In- 
flation resumed its spiral even before. 
Hearts lightened at Christmas by talk 
of peace, are heavier than ever. 
"Where is there peace on earth?" 
Refugees have begun to reach Shao- 
wu ; they daily come to beg rice, medi- 
cine and money. 

Still, rebuilding from last year's 
fire continues — shop-homes better 
looking than the former ones. Chris- 
tians with rice (the only thing com- 
parable to a steady income or a bank 
account in America) quarrel over re- 
( Continued on page 7.) 



March 17, 1949. 



THE CHRISTIAN SUN 



Page Seven. 



ews of Elon College 



By President L. E. Smith 



FIRE PARTIALLY DESTROYS THE 
LATE J. 0. ATKINSON HOME 
AT ELON COLLEGE. 

Just as chapel adjourned this morn- 
ing, Friday, it was discovered that the 
house formerly owned by Dr. J. 0. 
Atkinson and family was on fire. The 
fire started in the attic on the north- 
east corner. Alarm was given. The 
fire departments of Elon College, Gib- 
sonville and Burlington responded. 
The flames were confined largely to 
the attic and the second floor. 

In early fall the college had the 
roof of the house insulated. The in- 
sulation and the slate roof held the 
flames until the fire department could 
get the fire under control. The roof 
and the ceiling to the second floor 
were completely destroyed. The re- 
mainder of the house, of course, was 
simply soaked with water. 

There were two faculty families liv- 
ing in the house and one married stu- 
dent. A third member of the faculty 
had moved out only a few weeks be- 
fore. The students responded to the 
call and removed all furniture from 
the burning building. The college has 
sustained quite a loss as a result of 
the fire and three families have been 
greatly inconvenienced. 

During the war the college pur- 
chased this property from the estate 
of the late Dr. and Mrs. J. 0. Atkin- 
son. An additional room and two 
baths were added. There were four 
comfortable apartments and they 
served the college well. 

The house was erected in 1892 by 
the late Jake Long, attorney. Dr. J. 
0. Atkinson purchased the home from 
Attorney Long in the summer of 1897. 
All of Dr. and Mrs. J. 0. Atkinson's 
children were born either in this house 
or while they were living there. The 
place held a lot of sentiment for the 
Atkinson family as well as for the 
college and the community. Should 
the college elect to rebuild on the same 
lines, it would cost in excess of $30,000 
The loss is supposed to be covered by 
insurance. Future plans will await 
the decision of the insurance com- 
pany. All students entering Elon 
College since 1892 and all people who 
have lived in the community will re- 
call this home. It was one of the larg- 
est, best built and most neatly kept 
homes in Elon College, It was a cred- 



it to the community. Its loss will be 
a source of regret by maiy people. 



APPORTIONMENT GIVING. 

The financial needs of Elon College 
are accentuated today, perhaps more 
decidedly than any previous day in 
many years. The expansion of the fa- 
cilities and the growth of the college 
in recent years have brought it to a 
position of prestige in relation to sim- 
ilar colleges throughout the country. 
If it is to maintain its present posi- 
tion and to keep pace with sister in- 
stitutions its financial support must 
be increased accordingly. Today as 
never before money determines the 
efficiency and the position of the col- 
lege. The expenses of operation have 
increased in such proportions and the 
need for increased faculty salaries is 
emphasized with almost every issue 
of our daily papers. State and Fed- 
eral Governments are providing funds 
in such large amounts for our tax- 
supported schools that the constit- 
uents of our church-colleges will be al- 
most compelled to make increased 
funds available for our institutions. 

It is good of the Southern Conven- 
tion to apportion $15,000 to the 
churches of the Convention for Elon 
College. It certainly would be of tre- 
mendous help if our churches would 
pay these apportionments as the 
months come and go. The college's 
expenses accrue daily and should be 
paid on the first of each month. Every 
dollar received from the church helps 
materially in meeting our obligations. 
The college is most grateful for the 



churches' assistance. 

Previously reported $1,650.08 

Eastern N. C. Conference : 

Wake Chapel S. S 23.46 

N. C. & Va. Conference: 

Ingram S. S 16.95 

Liberty S. S 4.10 

Long's Chapel 35.00 

W estem 3ST. C. Conference : 

Seagrove 40.00 



Total $ 119.51 



Grand total $1,769.59 



LETTER FROM THE JACKSONS. 

(Continued from page 6.) 
lief clothing, and getting it to the 
really needy is a difficult task. Wool 
yarn is so scarce (there is none for 



sale anywhere) that even the well-to- 
do look cold. But there is still fresh- 
ly dyed cloth spread to dry on the lot 
by East Gate Church; the noodle 
racks are not often empty; fresh veg- 
etables still line the street ; and people 
give feasts for engagements, wed- 
dings, funerals or anything a bit spe- 
cial. 

There is even some optimism about 
the outcome of the war despite all the 
American news reports that National- 
ist China is doomed. As one young 
man said, "Look what happened in 
America last November. Truman was 
elected despite all the contrary pre- 
dictions. Anything might happen 
now. ' ' 

Local politics are none too calm, 
however. Last fall several brothers 
were arrested, apparently for organ- 
izing a third party — with guns. The 
newly decorated entrance of the Dem- 
ocratic League's headquarters, prac- 
tically next door to us, is nothing but 
a gate now that the party has been 
outlawed. A few nights ago shop 
fronts on the next street were pla- 
carded with signs accusing a local 
leader of misappropriation of funds 
(rice). 

Though the Chinese are famous for 
their